Buffett’s Favorite Market Indicator Is Flashing Warning Signs

By Rob Williams  Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Warren Buffett’s favorite market indicator says stocks are in trouble.

The billionaire chief executive of Berkshire Hathaway once wrote that the “single best” way to see if the market is too expensive by comparing the total value of all publicly traded stocks with the total size of the economy.

It’s like determining the value of a car by the horsepower of its engine.

Image: Money: Buffett's Favorite Market Indicator Is Flashing Warning Signs
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Could The Stock Market Crash?

By David Chapman – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

I don’t believe we will see another financial crisis in our lifetime.”

  • Janet Yellen, Fed Chair, June 27, 2017

Oh, Janet. We hope you are right. One should never say never—that has a nasty habit of coming back to bite you.

Texas and Houston are currently going through their crash. No, not a stock market crash but a hurricane and flooding crash. Hurricane Harvey has been called a “once in 500 years’ event.” Except in the past twelve years, we have also had Hurricane Katrina and Sandy. They were called “once in 100 years events.” The 400-year difference seems moot. It is becoming a little flippant to call them “once in a lifetime” events when three “lifetime” events have occurred in twelve short years. Yet, for all of them the experts did not see the devastation that was coming.

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Copper Hits Fresh 2-Year High on Possible China Scrap Ban

By Anjli Raval, David Sheppard, & Tom Hancock – Re-Blogged From Financial Times

The Red metal is a key source of income for some of the world’s biggest mining companies. Copper jumped to its highest level in two years on reports that China could ban imports of scrap metal by the end of next year — a move that would probably boost demand for refined metals in the world’s top importer.

Copper for delivery in three months on the London Metal Exchange rose as high as $6,400 a tonne on Wednesday, a level not seen since May 2015, having risen by about 5 per cent over the past two sessions. In afternoon trading, it moderated its gains to $6,316 a tonne.

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See No Evil…Speak No Evil

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

The Jackson Hole speeches of Janet Yellen and Mario Draghi last week were notable for the omission of any comment about the burning issues of the day: where do the Fed and the ECB respectively think America and the Eurozone are in the central bank induced credit cycle, and therefore, what are the Fed and the ECB going to do with interest rates? And why is it still appropriate for the ECB to be injecting raw money into the Eurozone banks to the tune of $60bn per month, if the great financial crisis is over?

Instead, they stuck firmly to their topics, the Jackson Hole theme for 2017 being Fostering a dynamic global economy. Both central bankers told us how good they have been at controlling events since the last financial crisis. Ms Yellen majored on regulation, bolstering her earlier-expressed belief that financial crises are now unlikely to happen again, because American banks are properly regulated and capitalised.

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Fed’s Dudley Drops Bombshell: Low Inflation “Actually Might Be a Good Thing”

By Wolf Richter – Re-Blogged From Wolf Street

QE unwind in September, “another rate hike later this year.”

The media have been talking themselves into a lather about how the less-than-2% inflation would force the Fed to stop hiking rates. But William Dudley, president of the New York Fed and one of the most influential voices on the policy-setting Federal Open Markets Committee (FOMC), just dropped a stunning bombshell about low inflation – why it might be low and how that “actually might be a good thing.”

The kickoff for unwinding QE appears to be in the can. There’s unanimous support for it on the FOMC. It appears to be scheduled for the September meeting. The market has digested the coming “balance sheet normalization.” Stocks have risen and long-term yields have fallen, and financial conditions have eased further, which is the opposite of what the Fed wants to accomplish; it wants to tighten financial conditions. So it will keep tightening its policy until financial conditions are tightening.

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Spain’s New Big Bubble Begins to Wobble

By Don Quijones – Re-Blogged From WOLF STREET.

Since hitting rock bottom in 2013, Spain has been one of the biggest engines of economic growth in Europe, expanding at around 3% per year. But according to a report by the Bank of Spain, most of the factors behind this growth — such as cheaper global oil prices, the ECB’s expansionary monetary policy, and the subsequent decline in value of the Euro — are externally driven and transitory in nature.

This is particularly true for arguably the biggest driver of Spain’s economic recovery, its unprecedented tourism boom, which some local economists are finally beginning to call a bubble.

In large part the boom/bubble is a result of the recent surge in geopolitical risks affecting rival tourist destinations like Turkey, Egypt, Tunisia and, in smaller measure, France, which helped boost the number of foreign visitors to Spain in 2016 to a historic record of 75.3 million people — an 11.8% increase on 2015.

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Is The Yellen Fed Planning To Sabotage Trump’s Presidency?

By Stefan Gleason – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

The Federal Reserve can make or break a president.

Monetary policy influences all financial markets as well as the cycles in the economy. No president wants to have to run for re-election when the stock market and economy are turning down.

Recall that President George H.W. Bush was sitting on sky-high job approval numbers in 1991 and was expected to coast to victory in his 1992 re-election bid. But then the economy swooned toward recession, giving Bill Clinton the opening he needed.

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