Scientists Gene-Hack Human Cells to Turn Invisible

They gave human cells squid-like active camouflage.

By Dan Robitzski

Active Camo

By tinkering with the genetics of human cells, a team of scientists gave them the ability to camouflage.

To do so, they took a page out of the squid’s playbook, New Atlas reports. Specifically, they engineered the human cells to produce a squid protein known as reflectin, which scatters light to create a sense of transparency or iridescence.

Not only is it a bizarre party trick, but figuring out how to gene-hack specific traits into human cells gives scientists a new avenue to explore how the underlying genetics actually works.

Rice genetically engineered to resist heat waves can also produce up to 20% more grain

By Erik Stokstad– Re-Blogged From Science

Why Modern Famine Predictions Failed !

By Jim Steele, – Re-Blogged From WUWT

What’s Natural column, published in the Pacifica Tribune

When I graduated high school in 1968 there were rampant predictions of environmental collapse and eco-catastrophe theories flourished. The highly influential Stanford scientist Dr Paul Ehrlich dominated the doomsday media stating, “Most of the people who are going to die in the greatest cataclysm in the history of man have already been born.” Predicting global famine in 1970 this PhD wrote, “The death rate will increase until at least 100-200 million people per year will be starving to death during the next ten years.”

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Victims if 1876 Famine in India

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Scientists Predict ‘Jurassic Park’ Might become a Reality

Re-Blogged From Off The Wire

What if Jurassic Park became a reality?

Jurassic Park was a cultural blockbuster international sensation that still lives up to its quality over 25 years later because the 1993 masterpiece was the landmark film for the next evolution of computer graphics that we see in every film today. But despite the incredible revolutionary graphics that made dinosaurs look real; what if you could witness them in real life?

Jurassic Park

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Blood Pressure Study Could Prevent Thousands of Heart Attacks, Strokes

By Zoe Papadakis – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A breakthrough blood pressure study could prevent thousands of heart attacks and strokes each year and it all has to do with genetics, experts announced Monday.

The discovery was made by researchers from Queen Mary University of London and Imperial College London, who conducted the largest global genetic study and found over 500 new gene regions responsible for influencing a person’s blood pressure.

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Evolutionary Geneticists Spot Natural Selection Happening Now in People

By The Conversation – Re-Blogged From Futurism

In Brief

Everyone who’s been through high school knows about Darwin and natural selection. It’s difficult to study how it works while we’re experiencing it, but we now have some idea of how natural selection is affecting humans.

Human evolution can seem like a phenomenon of the distant past which applies only to our ancestors living millions of years ago. But human evolution is ongoing. To evolve simply means that mutations — the accidental changes to genes that happen normally in the process of copying DNA — are becoming more or less common in the population over time.

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Outwitting Climate Change With a Plant ‘Dimmer’?

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

From the TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF MUNICH (TUM) and the “dim and dimmer” department comes this finding that suggests GMO tweaking of plant DNA is the way to “outwit” the apparent nefarious intelligence of climate change.

Molecular mechanism responsible for blooming in spring identified

For many plant species, such as the thale cress, which is often used in research, but also for food crops such as corn, rice and wheat, there are now initiatives currently mapping the genome of many subspecies and varieties. CREDIT Photo: Regnault/ TUM

Outwitting climate change with a plant ‘dimmer’?

Plants possess molecular mechanisms that prevent them from blooming in winter. Once the cold of win-ter has passed, they are deactivated. However, if it is still too cold in spring, plants adapt their blooming behavior accordingly. Scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have discovered genetic changes for this adaptive behavior. In light of the temperature changes resulting from climate change, this may come in useful for securing the production of food in the future.

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