Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #306

By Ken Haapala, President, The Science and Environmental Policy Project

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

Bureaucratic Science: TWTW has used the term bureaucratic science, which may have confused some of its readers. Bureaucratic science occurs when a government entity, or a similar organization, charged with applying the best science possible, drifts from its purpose and institutes policies and procedures (methodology) that are inconsistent with its mission. The brightest, most competent and conscientious people may be involved. Education level does not matter. Bureaucratic science can be considered a subset of Group Think, ably discussed by Christopher Booker, presented in last week’s TWTW.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #305

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

Group Think: Author and journalist Christopher Booker has produced an extensive booklet for the Global Warming Policy Foundation (GWPF) applying the concept of groupthink to the climate establishment. This is not the first time the concept has been so employed. Others, such as Tim Ball, have used the concept, but Booker’s effort is the most systematic and comprehensive.

Groupthink describes systematic errors made by groups when making collective decisions. It was popularized by Research Psychologist Irving Janis in his 1982 book of that title. Janis used it to describe the poor US preparation, despite warnings, for the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, and the failed US-supported invasion of Castro’s Cuba in 1961. His work suggests that pressures for conformity restrict independent and critical thinking by individuals of the group, biasing the group’s analyses.

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Global Trade: Looking at the Big Picture

Mark Fleming-Williams   By Mark Fleming-Williams – Re-Blogged From Stratfor


  • Global trade is in flux after the United States has made clear that it is no longer willing to take the lead.
  • While the United States wants to shake up international commerce, China wants to preserve the status quo, and Europe wants to continue on the post-war path.
  • The divergent interests of other countries and blocs, including China, Japan and the European Union, will make substantial alignment without the United States difficult.

(IStock Photos)

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2017 Trade Deficit Worst since 2008

By Wolf Richter – Re-Blogged From Wolf Street

Trade deficit in non-petroleum products hit a record of $734 billion.

2017 was a banner year for the US trade deficit, according to the Commerce Department’s report today. Corporate America’s supply chains weave all over the world in search of lower costs. Other countries have an “industrial policy” designed to produce trade surpluses for them. This combo ballooned the US trade deficit in goods and services to $566 billion, up by $61 billion, or 12%, from 2016. It was the worst trade deficit since 2008.

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Global Investment in Renewable Energy Has Stalled

By Steve Goreham – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Earlier this month, the Trump Administration announced a decision to apply a 30 percent tariff on imported solar cells and panels. The Solar Industries Association denounced the measure, projecting job losses and cancellation of solar investments. But the solar tariff discussion hides a larger renewable energy issue. Global investment in renewables has stalled in the US, in Europe, and in many markets across the world.

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Global Synchronized Bond Collapse

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From http://www.pentoport.com

We have all heard, in ad nauseam fashion, Wall Street’s current favorite mantra touting a global synchronized economic recovery. For the record, global GDP growth for 2017 was 3.7%, according to the International Monetary Fund. And, although this is an improvement from recent years, you must take into account that in 2004 it was 4.4%, in 2005 it was 3.8%, in 2006 it was 4.3%, and in 2007 it was 4.2%. The Point being, it’s not as if the current rate of global growth has climbed to a level never before witnessed in history—it’s not even close.

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Brexit – The Battle For Ideas

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From GoldMoney

The battle for ideas in the Brexit debate comes down to two basic economic approaches. The neo-Keynesian macroeconomists in the permanent establishment, who manage the state as economic planners and regulators are on one side. They are naturally sympathetic with the policies and ideals of their EU counterparts. Against them are those who argue that in economics free markets must have primacy over the state.

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