Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #425

The Week That Was: September 19, 2020, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “It is one thing to impose drastic measures and harsh economic penalties when an environmental problem is clear-cut and severe. It is quite another to do so when the environmental problem is largely hypothetical and not substantiated by careful observations. This is definitely the case with global warming.” – Frederick Seitz, Introduction to Fred Singer’s Hot Talk, Cold Science (1999)

Number of the Week: 64%

NO TWTW NEXT WEEK: There will be no TWTW the week of September 26. TWTW will resume the weekend of October 3.

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Greenhouse Effect – Critical for Life: Last week, TWTW discussed that in 1859, physicist John Tyndall began experiments on gases that interfere with the loss of electromagnetic energy (heat) from the surface of the earth to space. These gases, known as greenhouse gases, keep the earth warmer than it would be otherwise, particularly at night. Tyndall recognized that water vapor is the dominant greenhouse gas, and without it land masses would freeze at night, making vegetative growth virtually impossible.

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A Public Service Announcement on Temperature

By – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Dog owners, this might surprise you. Since we deal with temperature a great deal here on WUWT, and since the only canine member of the Union of Concerned Scientists has informed me that he is concerned about this issue, and since we are getting into the hot season here in the northern hemisphere, I thought I’d take a moment to pass on this information as a public service announcement.

From the American Veterinary Medical Association:

Every year, hundreds of pets die from heat exhaustion because they are left in parked vehicles. We’ve heard the excuses: “Oh, it will just be a few minutes while I go into the store,” or “But I cracked the windows…” These excuses don’t amount to much if your pet becomes seriously ill or dies from being left in a vehicle.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #177

The Week That Was: April 18, 2015 – Brought to You by www.SEPP.org The Science and Environmental Policy Project

THIS WEEK: By Ken Haapala, President, SEPP – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Energy Not Heat, Exclusively: A source of frustration for members of SEPP, and others, are the efforts by some of classifying these skeptics as denying the existence of the greenhouse effect, often by claiming that the greenhouse effect is contrary to the second law of thermodynamics. The law applies to the flow of heat (thermal energy) from a warmer body to a cooler one. The atomic theory of heat (thermal energy) is based on the motion of atoms and/or molecules. Though it may use atoms, the transfer of energy does not require them. There forms of energy other than heat.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #170

The Week That Was:February 28, 2015 – Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP)

Politicized Science: This week members of Congress removed any doubt that Climate Science has become highly politicized, virtually ignoring that scientific knowledge is based on empirical evidence, not based on what some scientists claim they think they know. The once respected New York Times (NYT), had an article criticizing Wei-Hock Soon (Willie Soon) for failing to disclose in publications that the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics received some $1.2 million from fossil fuel sources to support the work of Soon, including the utility company, Southern Company. The Center also received some of this money from the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation, which is now a favorite target of environmental groups. The article stated that the documents were obtained by Greenpeace, an environmental group, but failed to mention that Greenpeace is a leader in the anti-fossil fuel movement.

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