Nanoparticle Tech Reduces Celiac Disease Symptoms by 90%

By Kristin Houser – Re-Blogged From Futurism

Let them eat cake. And bread. And…

People with celiac disease have two options in life, neither of which is ideal.

Because their immune systems can’t tolerate gluten, they can choose to never eat the many delicious foods containing it. Boring.

Or they can devour all the cake, bread, and beer they want — but resign themselves to abdominal pain, diarrhea, and other nasty side effects when their immune systems trigger an inflammation response in their small intestines.

Continue reading

Modern Scientific Controversies Part 7: The Meat War

By Kip Hansen  —  Re-Blogged From WUWT

Prologue:  This is part of  an occasional  series of essays that discusses ongoing scientific controversies, a specific type of which are often referred to in the science press and elsewhere as “Wars” – for instance, one essay covered the “Salt Wars1 and another the “Obesity War” — and one which appears most commonly here at this web site: “The Climate Wars”.    The purpose of the series is to illuminate the similarities and differences involved in these ongoing controversies, as part of the social culture of science in our modern world.

This essay specifically covers the furor over a six-paper body of work that appeared recently in The Annals of Internal Medicine reviewing the evidence used to make public health recommendations for amounts of red and processed meat in the human diet.

In The Meat War, the headlines scream out:

The_Meat_War

Continue reading

Magnesium Deficiency Raises Cardiac Risks

Dr. Chauncey Crandall, From Newsmax Health

There is evidence that magnesium can help prevent sudden cardiac death (SCD), the largest cause of death in the United States.

One study, published in 2011, looked at data collected from the Nurses’ Health Study of 88,000 women who were followed for 26 years. Researchers analyzed the data to learn whether magnesium played a role in preventing SCD.

Their report, published in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition, showed that the risk of SCD was significantly lower in women in the highest quartile of magnesium consumption. Women with the highest blood levels of magnesium had a 41 percent lower risk of sudden cardiac death.

Continue reading

Chinese Researcher Claims First Gene-Edited Babies

By Christina Larsen – Re-Blogged From APNews

HONG KONG (AP) — A Chinese researcher claims that he helped make the world’s first genetically edited babies — twin girls born this month whose DNA he said he altered with a powerful new tool capable of rewriting the very blueprint of life.

If true, it would be a profound leap of science and ethics.

A U.S. scientist said he took part in the work in China, but this kind of gene editing is banned in the United States because the DNA changes can pass to future generations and it risks harming other genes.

Continue reading

Drug Combination Grows Cells to Control Diabetes

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

People with diabetes often don’t have enough insulin-producing beta cells to control their blood sugar, but a combination of two novel drugs may coax the body into making more of these vital cells, an early study finds.

Together, the drugs caused beta cells to reproduce at a rate of about 5 percent to 8 percent a day, according to the researchers. Work has only been done in the lab and in rodents, and a major hurdle remains before this treatment could be tried in humans: researchers need to develop a targeted delivery system.

“We’re at a stage where we have nuclear warheads but no guided missiles. We can’t just release the treatment because we don’t want to affect other cells,” explained study senior author Dr. Andrew Stewart. He’s the director of the Mount Sinai Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism Institute in New York City.

Continue reading

Just 6 Months of Walking May Boost Aging Brains

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Walking and other types of moderate exercise might help turn back the clock for older adults who are losing their mental sharpness, a new clinical trial finds.

The study focused on older adults who had milder problems with memory and thinking skills. The researchers found that six months of moderate exercise – walking or pedaling a stationary bike – turned some of those issues around.

Specifically, exercisers saw improvements in their executive function – the brain’s ability to pay attention, regulate behavior, get organized and achieve goals. And those who also made some healthy diet changes, including eating more fruits and vegetables, showed somewhat bigger gains.

The effect was equivalent to shaving about nine years from their brain age, said lead researcher James Blumenthal, a professor at Duke University School of Medicine, in Durham, N.C.

Bionic Eye to Aid the Blind Ready for Human Trials

By Eric Mack – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Biomedical engineering is closing in on a device that can help the blind see, according to the U.K.’s Daily Star.

A bionic eye is set to be implanted into humans for the first time, as the University of Sydney, Australia, seeks human trials before a potential release of the “Phoenix 99 Bionic Eye.”

austrailian prime minister kevin rudd looks at the prototype for a bionic eye with includes a pair of glasses.
Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd inspects a prototype bionic eye which will deliver improved quality of life for patients suffering from degenerative vision loss. (WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images)

Continue reading