Salamander DNA Could Regenerate Human Body Parts

By Dan Robitzski  – Re-Blogged From Futurism

“It’s hard to find a body part they can’t regenerate: the limbs, the tail, the spinal cord, the eye, and in some species, the lens, even half of their brain has been shown to regenerate.”

For the first time, scientists have completely sequenced the genome of the axolotl, a bizarre salamander that’s capable of regenerating many of its body parts after an injury.

By unlocking the entirety of the axolotl’s genetic code, according to a press release, doctors from the University of Kentucky hope that they may be able to use it in human medicine. By developing new genetic treatments, they hope that someday humans may be able to regenerate missing limbs or reverse other damage, like salamanders do.

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Corona Virus Map

  By Bob Shapiro

Johns Hopkins has a Corona Virus map that appears to be updated daily showing where confirmed cases have been reported, along with stats on deaths and recoveries. It gives a breakdown by country – I was surprised that the US showed 15 confirmed cases.

Take a look at: https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6

CONTINUE READING –>

This AI Can Detect ADHD Better than Humans

The same approach could be applied to other neurological conditions as well.
By Victor Tangermann – Re-Blogged From Futurism

A team of researchers used a type of artificial intelligence to predict attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in patients by having it analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. According to a new paper published in the journal Radiology: Artificial Intelligence, their technique could also be used to spot other neurological conditions.

Health care professionals have increasingly been relying on MRI scans to understand ADHD, a brain disorder that often causes patients to be restless, and makes it more difficult for them to pay attention. More than eight percent of children in the U.S. have been diagnosed with the condition according to The American Psychiatric Association (APA).

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Hidden Economic and Social Despair as U.S. Life Expectancy Drops

Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

A reversal of American life expectancy, a downward trend that has now been sustained for three years in a row, is a grim new reality of life in the United States.

New research establishes that after decades of living longer and longer lives, Americans are dying earlier, cut down increasingly in the prime of life by drug overdoses, suicides and diseases such as cirrhosis, liver cancer and obesity.

The ills claiming the lives of Americans between the ages of 25 and 64 vary widely by geography, gender and ethnicity. But the authors of the new study suggest that the nation’s lifespan reversal is being driven by diseases linked to social and economic privation, a health care system with glaring gaps and blind spots, and profound psychological distress.

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Nanoparticle Tech Reduces Celiac Disease Symptoms by 90%

By Kristin Houser – Re-Blogged From Futurism

Let them eat cake. And bread. And…

People with celiac disease have two options in life, neither of which is ideal.

Because their immune systems can’t tolerate gluten, they can choose to never eat the many delicious foods containing it. Boring.

Or they can devour all the cake, bread, and beer they want — but resign themselves to abdominal pain, diarrhea, and other nasty side effects when their immune systems trigger an inflammation response in their small intestines.

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Modern Scientific Controversies Part 7: The Meat War

By Kip Hansen  —  Re-Blogged From WUWT

Prologue:  This is part of  an occasional  series of essays that discusses ongoing scientific controversies, a specific type of which are often referred to in the science press and elsewhere as “Wars” – for instance, one essay covered the “Salt Wars1 and another the “Obesity War” — and one which appears most commonly here at this web site: “The Climate Wars”.    The purpose of the series is to illuminate the similarities and differences involved in these ongoing controversies, as part of the social culture of science in our modern world.

This essay specifically covers the furor over a six-paper body of work that appeared recently in The Annals of Internal Medicine reviewing the evidence used to make public health recommendations for amounts of red and processed meat in the human diet.

In The Meat War, the headlines scream out:

The_Meat_War

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Magnesium Deficiency Raises Cardiac Risks

Dr. Chauncey Crandall, From Newsmax Health

There is evidence that magnesium can help prevent sudden cardiac death (SCD), the largest cause of death in the United States.

One study, published in 2011, looked at data collected from the Nurses’ Health Study of 88,000 women who were followed for 26 years. Researchers analyzed the data to learn whether magnesium played a role in preventing SCD.

Their report, published in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition, showed that the risk of SCD was significantly lower in women in the highest quartile of magnesium consumption. Women with the highest blood levels of magnesium had a 41 percent lower risk of sudden cardiac death.

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Chinese Researcher Claims First Gene-Edited Babies

By Christina Larsen – Re-Blogged From APNews

HONG KONG (AP) — A Chinese researcher claims that he helped make the world’s first genetically edited babies — twin girls born this month whose DNA he said he altered with a powerful new tool capable of rewriting the very blueprint of life.

If true, it would be a profound leap of science and ethics.

A U.S. scientist said he took part in the work in China, but this kind of gene editing is banned in the United States because the DNA changes can pass to future generations and it risks harming other genes.

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Drug Combination Grows Cells to Control Diabetes

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

People with diabetes often don’t have enough insulin-producing beta cells to control their blood sugar, but a combination of two novel drugs may coax the body into making more of these vital cells, an early study finds.

Together, the drugs caused beta cells to reproduce at a rate of about 5 percent to 8 percent a day, according to the researchers. Work has only been done in the lab and in rodents, and a major hurdle remains before this treatment could be tried in humans: researchers need to develop a targeted delivery system.

“We’re at a stage where we have nuclear warheads but no guided missiles. We can’t just release the treatment because we don’t want to affect other cells,” explained study senior author Dr. Andrew Stewart. He’s the director of the Mount Sinai Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism Institute in New York City.

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Just 6 Months of Walking May Boost Aging Brains

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Walking and other types of moderate exercise might help turn back the clock for older adults who are losing their mental sharpness, a new clinical trial finds.

The study focused on older adults who had milder problems with memory and thinking skills. The researchers found that six months of moderate exercise – walking or pedaling a stationary bike – turned some of those issues around.

Specifically, exercisers saw improvements in their executive function – the brain’s ability to pay attention, regulate behavior, get organized and achieve goals. And those who also made some healthy diet changes, including eating more fruits and vegetables, showed somewhat bigger gains.

The effect was equivalent to shaving about nine years from their brain age, said lead researcher James Blumenthal, a professor at Duke University School of Medicine, in Durham, N.C.

Bionic Eye to Aid the Blind Ready for Human Trials

By Eric Mack – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Biomedical engineering is closing in on a device that can help the blind see, according to the U.K.’s Daily Star.

A bionic eye is set to be implanted into humans for the first time, as the University of Sydney, Australia, seeks human trials before a potential release of the “Phoenix 99 Bionic Eye.”

austrailian prime minister kevin rudd looks at the prototype for a bionic eye with includes a pair of glasses.
Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd inspects a prototype bionic eye which will deliver improved quality of life for patients suffering from degenerative vision loss. (WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images)

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Exercise After Heart Attack May Improve Survival

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Exercising after a heart attack, even a long walk around the neighborhood, can be frightening for survivors. But those fears may be eased by new research that found regular physical activity could help keep them alive.

Many heart attack survivors initially worry that exercise or any type of prolonged activity that increases their heart rate could strain their recovering heart. But a new Swedish study published Dec. 11 in the Journal of the American Heart Association found that even a low level of physical activity within the first year of a heart attack was enough to reduce the odds of dying in the immediate years that followed.

Excess Winter Deaths in England and Wales Highest Since 1976

[Excess Deaths are calculated as that period’s difference from the yearly average. If there were 12,000 deaths in a typical year, or 1000 per month, and in December there were 2500, then there were 2500 – 1000 = 1500 ‘Excess Deaths’ in that December. -Bob]

By Dennis Campbell – Re-Blogged From The Guardian

Call for more NHS resources as elderly people and women among most vulnerable

Snow in Derbyshire
Snow in Derbyshire last December. The temperatures last winter are thought to have been partly to blame for the excess deaths. Photograph: Joe Giddens/PA

There were 50,100 excess deaths in England and Wales last winter, when there was a prolonged spell of extreme cold, making it the highest number since 1976, figures have shown.

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Can We Cheat Aging?

By Diego Arguedaz Ortiz, Beth Sagar Fenton and Helena Merriman – Re-Blogged From BBC

All around the world, scientists are trying to beat the most debilitating condition known to humans: ageing. Here is how worms and 3D printers can help.

As she headed to her lab one sunny Texan morning, molecular biologist Meng Wang couldn’t yet guess what would be waiting for her when she arrived: tens of thousands of worms, wriggling around in different boxes. As she peered into each box, slowly it dawned on her. What she saw could cure the most debilitating condition known to humanity: ageing.

Diseases related to ageing – like cancer, rheumatism and Alzheimer’s – kill 100,000 people every day around the world. But a growing number of scientists say it doesn’t have to be this way.

Energy Poverty Kills More People Than Coal

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

This is sort of a sequel to Environmental Groups Claim Coal Killed 7,600 People in Europe in 2016… Can’t Name Any of the Victims.

The World Health Organization estimates that ambient (outdoor) air pollution kills (premature deaths) about 4.2 million people per year.  At least some of these nameless deaths could possibly be chalked up to coal.  Although the power sector only accounts for a fraction of the anthropogenic sources of ambient air pollution and coal is just the largest fraction of that fraction.

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What You Need to Know About Vitamin D

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

You’d think vitamin deficiencies would be rare in the United States, but many people are running low on vitamin D, and it’s a serious health threat.

Being short on vitamin D not only affects bone density, it’s also been linked to conditions such as heart disease, mental decline, some types of cancer, autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases and type 2 diabetes.

The problem is twofold: Not knowing how much vitamin D you really need, and how to get it. While 600 to 800 International Units (IUs) is the recommended daily amount, it can take more than that to bring you up to a healthy level and maintain it once you have a deficit.

Snoring May Be Bigger Health Threat to Women Than Men

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

The hearts of women who snore appear to become damaged more quickly than those of men who “saw lumber” at night, a new study suggests.

Evaluating nearly 4,500 British adults who underwent cardiac imaging, researchers also learned that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may be vastly underdiagnosed among snorers.

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Give thanks that we no longer live on the precipice

By Paul Driessen – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Fossil fuels helped humanity improve our health, living standards and longevity in just 200 years

Thanksgiving is a good time to express our sincere gratitude that we no longer “enjoy” the “simpler life of yesteryear.” As my grandmother said, “The only good thing about the good old days is that they’re gone.”

For countless millennia, mankind lived on a precipice, in hunter-gatherer, subsistence farmer and primitive urban industrial societies powered by human and animal muscle, wood, charcoal, animal dung, water wheels and windmills. Despite backbreaking dawn-to-dusk labor, wretched poverty was the norm; starvation was a drought, war or long winter away; rampant diseases and infections were addressed by herbs, primitive medicine and superstition. Life was “eco-friendly,” but life spans averaged 35 to 40 years.

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Living in Noisy Neighborhoods Can Cause Heart Attacks

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Living in noise-saturated neighborhoods might be more than simply annoying – it can increase your risk factors for serious health problems including heart attack, heart disease and stroke, new research.

Chronic noise from traffic and airports appears to trigger the amygdala, a brain region critically involved in stress regulation, brain scans have revealed.

Noise is also associated with increased inflammation of the arteries, which is a risk factor for stroke, heart attack and heart disease, said lead researcher Dr. Azar Radfar. She is a research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

Blood Pressure Study Could Prevent Thousands of Heart Attacks, Strokes

By Zoe Papadakis – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A breakthrough blood pressure study could prevent thousands of heart attacks and strokes each year and it all has to do with genetics, experts announced Monday.

The discovery was made by researchers from Queen Mary University of London and Imperial College London, who conducted the largest global genetic study and found over 500 new gene regions responsible for influencing a person’s blood pressure.

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Japan Scientists to Use ‘Reprogrammed’ Stem Cells to Fight Parkinson’s

By Thomson Reuters – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

TOKYO – Japanese scientists said Monday they will start clinical trials next month on a treatment for Parkinson’s disease, transplanting “reprogrammed” stem cells into brains, seeking a breakthrough in treating the neurodegenerative disorder.

Parkinson’s is caused by a lack of dopamine made by brain cells and researchers have long hoped to use stem cells to restore normal production of the neurotransmitter chemical.

Low-Impact Walking Better for You Than Running

By Dr. Mehmet Oz & Dr. Mike Roizen – Re-Blogged from http://www.Newsmax.com

George Meegan spent seven years walking 19,019 miles from the southern tip of South America to Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. But you don’t have to walk that far to gain the benefits of putting one foot in front of the other.

Among its virtues: Walking is low-impact, and you likely won’t get injured or wear out your joints. Plus, as you’re passed by joggers who seem to be thinking, “What’s walking? That’s not exercise!” you can take satisfaction in knowing that your activity actually delivers MORE health benefits than running does!

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New Drug Offers Hope of Alzheimer’s Breakthrough

By HealthDay – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

There have been many setbacks on the long road to finding a treatment that might slow or stop Alzheimer’s disease, but a new trial offers a glimmer of hope.

Researchers report that an experimental drug called BAN2401 slowed mental decline by as much as 30 percent in Alzheimer’s patients. It also appeared to clear away the amyloid protein plaques in the brain that have long been linked to the devastating illness.

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After a Heart Attack, Return to Work Can Be Good Medicine

By HealthDay – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

After five weeks off recovering from her heart attack, Melissa Murphy looked forward to returning to her job.

“I’m back out, and I’m contributing again,” the Iowa mother of two remembered thinking. “I’m not a victim, which is how you sometimes feel when you’re sitting on your couch and everybody leaves to go to work or school and you’re left with your thoughts.”

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The Danger of Dehydration

Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A recent Canadian heat wave, in which over 70 people perished, drives home the point  summertime can wreak havoc with your health. As the temperatures soar, so do the numbers of patients admitted to medical centers for dehydration, fatigue, and heatstroke.

According to the Institute of Medicine, although we know perfectly well water is the way to go to prevent dehydration, 75 percent of Americans consume far below the recommended daily minimum, regardless of the season.

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An Orange a Day Keeps Blindness Away

By Bill Hoffmann – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Eating just one orange a day may help stop macular degeneration, a major cause of blindness, according to a new study.

Researchers who interviewed more than 2,000 adults age 50 and above, and followed them over a 15-year period, found those who regularly eat oranges are less likely to develop the age-related, vision-robbing disease.

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1 in 9 US Adults Over 45 Reports Memory Problems

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

 If you’re middle-aged and you think you’re losing your memory, you’re not alone, a new U.S. government report shows.

In fact, one in nine Americans aged 45 and older say they are experiencing thinking declines. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, noticing a decline in your mental abilities (“cognitive decline”) is one of the earliest signs of impending Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.

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New Blood Test Can Tell When You Will Die?

By Zoe Papadakis – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Can a blood test tell when you will die? Scientists at Yale University now believe they can predict a person’s life expectancy based on the results of a simple new test.

It all has to do with determining the biological age of a person’s body, Newsweek reported.

And the Yale scientists believe they can determine the biological age of a person’s body based on nine biomarkers found in the blood, The Guardian reported.

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Experimental Drug Halts Parkinson’s Progression

By Clyde Hughes – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

An experimental drug developed by Johns Hopkins University researchers appears to slow down the progression of Parkinson’s disease and its symptoms in mice, a statement from the university said this week.

The researchers said that the drug called NLY01 has been proven in studies to block the degradation of brain cells that is the leading cause of Parkinson’s disease. The treatment has been used in the past to treat diabetes, researchers said in the university statement.

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Diabetes Drugs May Help Treat Alzheimer’s

By Lynn Allison – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

We may be taking the wrong path to find a cure for Alzheimer’s disease, several experts say. For many years, scientists believed it was the accumulation of amyloid plaque and protein tangles in the brain cells that caused the dreaded disease.

But according to CNN, even the German physician Alois Alzheimer, who identified the brain changes in his deceased patients, cautioned that scientists should not to jump to the conclusion that these proteins actually caused the disease.

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New Evidence That Viruses May Play a Role in Alzheimer’s

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Viruses that sneak into the brain just might play a role in Alzheimer’s, scientists reported Thursday in a provocative study that promises to re-ignite some long-debated theories about what triggers the mind-robbing disease.

The findings don’t prove viruses cause Alzheimer’s, nor do they suggest it’s contagious.

Image: New Evidence That Viruses May Play a Role in Alzheimer's

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‘Liquid Biopsy’ Screens Blood for Cancer Before Symptoms Detectable

By Zoe Papadakis – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

“Liquid biopsies” will enable doctors to screen a patient’s blood for up to 10 different types of common cancers before they even start to show symptoms by picking up on DNA markers related to the disease, as well as measuring certain proteins commonly elevated when cancer is present, Voice of America reported.

For years researchers have been working to develop a quick and easy test that can detect cancer early and the idea of using blood samples to check for the disease has been gaining ground over the last few months, The American Cancer Society noted.

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Strong Grip May Predict Longer Life at All Ages

By Thomson Reuters – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Grip strength may be a better predictor of future health than some measurements doctors currently use to gauge risk, a large UK study suggests.

Although grip strength has long been a good indicator of frailty or health in older people, it could help doctors understand adults’ risk profile at all ages, including the odds of heart and lung disease, cancer and overall mortality, the study team writes in The BMJ.

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New Treatment Cripples Breast Cancer Cells

By AFP – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Scientists have identified the mechanism that allows breast cancer cells to lie dormant in other parts of the body only to re-emerge years later with lethal force, according to a study published Tuesday.

In experiments with human cells and live mice, researchers showed that disabling the mechanism — with drugs or gene manipulation — crippled the cancer cells and inhibited their capacity to spread.

Depression Is Skyrocketing in America

By Bill Hoffmann – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

If you’ve been feeling down and out more than usual, cheer up, you are not alone.

A new report compiled by insurance giant Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) says major depression diagnoses surged in the United States from 2013 through 2016, especially among adolescents and millennials.

And the study, which was based on medical claims filed to Blue Cross Blue Shield by 41 million customers, also links major depression to health issues such as other chronic conditions and substance abuse.

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7 Health Myths You Should Not Believe Anymore

By Romit Malhotra

(Summary:

Vitamin C doesn’t protect from cold, diabetes doesn’t affect elders only, and your microwave doesn’t destroy the nutrients. And so many more health myths you should not believe anymore.)

Do you believe that carrots improve vision? Does an apple a day keep the doctor away? Or you fear that microwave can kill the nutrients in your food?

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Swedish Study Reveals Secrets to Long, Healthy Life

By AFP/Relaxnews – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

An ongoing Swedish study has revealed some of the key steps that we can all take to age healthier and stay independent for longer, even after the age of 90.

Researchers at Uppsala University have shared some of the findings from their ongoing Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM), a study that began in 1970 and looks at 2,322 men who were born in the early 1920s.

The latest follow-up found that 276 of the 369 men originally taking part were still living alone and leading an independent life, even though the average age of the participants is now 87.

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Exercise Halves Risk of Dying After Heart Attack

By AFP/Relaxnews – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Exercising after a heart attack may help stave off death for longer, Swedish researchers said Thursday.

A study which followed 22,000 heart attack survivors aged 18-74, found that those who boosted their exercise levels after being discharged from hospital, halved their risk of dying within the first four years.

“It is well known that physically active people are less likely to have a heart attack and more likely to live longer,” said Orjan Ekblom of the Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences. Continue reading

Saunas Reduce Dementia Risks: Study

By Lynn Allison – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A sauna bath may do more than simply help you relax. A recent study has found men who take a sauna bath four to seven times weekly may reduce their risk of dementia by a whopping 66 percent.

The 20-year study, conducted by the University of Eastern Finland, involved more than 2,000 men and revealed that the more frequently saunas were taken, the lower the risk of dementia.

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3 Obesity Tests Better Than Body Mass Index

By Nick Tate – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

If you’re still using the BMI — body mass index — to determine if you’re dangerously overweight, you might as well be listening to music on an 8-track tape player or watching movies on an old VHS recorder.

That’s because the latest research shows that once-vaunted BMI is as outmoded as those old audio-video technologies and that other methods are far better at obesity-related risks for heart attack or other health problems.

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Pin-Prick Blood Test Spots Deadly Sepsis

Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Scientists on Monday unveiled a quick, cheap way to detect sepsis, a life-threatening condition in which the body is attacked by its own immune system.

In clinical trials at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, the researchers — analysing a single drop of blood with a thumb-size filtering device — singled out sepsis patients in a matter of hours with 95 percent accuracy.

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88 Percent MD Diagnosis Challenged

By Adrian Vance – Re-Blogged From iPatriot

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Daily Dose of Viagra May Reduce Colon Cancer Risk

By Sylvia Booth Hubbard – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A small daily dose of Viagra reduces the risk of colorectal cancer in mice genetically modified to have the disease. Viagra reduced the formation of polyps by 50 percent, according to a study performed at Augusta University’s Medical College of Georgia.

Polyps are abnormal clumps of cells on the lining of the intestines that may become cancer. Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Continue reading

Strength Training Boosts Brain

By Dr Gary Small – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

While most of the research connecting brain health to physical exercise has focused on cardiovascular conditioning, newer studies suggest that lifting weights or resistance training also supports better mental health.

Scientists in Brazil performed animal studies demonstrating that strength training and aerobic conditioning improve learning abilities and recall.

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Can New Techniques Replace Cartilage Lost to Arthritis?

By Lynn Allison – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

The controversy is electric. Clinics are opening across the country promising they can regenerate cartilage lost by arthritis by injecting products such as hyaluronic acid or platelet rich plasma (PRP) into the knee joint, the most common area that suffers degeneration.

But experts say that these techniques only provide temporary anti-inflammatory relief, at best, and repeated injections may actually worsen the condition.

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Eyes May Predict Future Memory Loss

Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

By looking deeply into your eyes, doctors might be able to predict your future risk for dementia and memory loss.

Unhealthy changes to the blood vessels of the retina could mirror changes taking place in the brain’s blood vessels, and that could contribute to a decline in mental ability, a new study suggests.

People with moderate to severe retinal damage are more likely to have bigger declines in memory and thinking over two decades than those with healthy eyes, researchers discovered.

Image: Eyes May Predict Future Memory Loss
(Copyright iStock)

Life Continues Within the Body After Death

By – Re-Blogged From Seeker

The body keeps working to repair itself after death, according to a provocative new study that could offer insight into how we might put the big sleep on hold.