Government Dietary Guidelines are Plain Wrong: Avoid Carbs, Not Fat

By Sarah Hallberg – Re-Blogged From The Hill

America is facing a chronic disease crisis. The federal government is fueling that crisis by promoting flawed nutritional advice that contradicts the latest research.

Every five years, the Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services publish the “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” which detail which foods Americans should eat or avoid. The highly influential document directs food labeling, school menus, public food programs, and government research grants.

Researchers claim the guidelines are based on “the preponderance of current scientific and medical knowledge.” Yet, since they were first introduced back in 1980, they’ve barely changed, even though a recent revolution in nutritional science has cast doubt on old assumptions.

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Living in Noisy Neighborhoods Can Cause Heart Attacks

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Living in noise-saturated neighborhoods might be more than simply annoying – it can increase your risk factors for serious health problems including heart attack, heart disease and stroke, new research.

Chronic noise from traffic and airports appears to trigger the amygdala, a brain region critically involved in stress regulation, brain scans have revealed.

Noise is also associated with increased inflammation of the arteries, which is a risk factor for stroke, heart attack and heart disease, said lead researcher Dr. Azar Radfar. She is a research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

Coming Soon, Computers That Will Read Your Heart Tests

By HealthDay – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Tapping into the technology behind facial recognition programs and self-driving cars, researchers in a new study have taught computers key elements of assessing echocardiograms.

The advance might simplify an otherwise extensive process now done by humans.

Researchers created algorithms to recognize images and potential heart problems that echocardiograms commonly capture, including enlarged chambers, diminished pumping function, and even some uncommon diseases.

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Wearable, At-Home Patch Could Spot Your A-Fib Early

By HealthDay – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

The common but dangerous heart rhythm disorder known as atrial fibrillation — or a-fib — can go undetected for years.

Now, research suggests a high-tech, wearable patch might spot the condition early.

Use of the Zio XT wireless patch, made by iRhythm, produced “an almost threefold improvement in the rate of diagnosis of a-fib in those actively monitored compared to usual care,” said study lead author Dr. Steven Steinhubl. He directs digital medicine at the Scripps Translational Science Institute, in La Jolla, Calif.

Image: Wearable, At-Home Patch Could Spot Your A-Fib Early

Exercise Halves Risk of Dying After Heart Attack

By AFP/Relaxnews – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Exercising after a heart attack may help stave off death for longer, Swedish researchers said Thursday.

A study which followed 22,000 heart attack survivors aged 18-74, found that those who boosted their exercise levels after being discharged from hospital, halved their risk of dying within the first four years.

“It is well known that physically active people are less likely to have a heart attack and more likely to live longer,” said Orjan Ekblom of the Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences. Continue reading