New Heated Airport Runway Concept May Sharply Bias ‘Global Warming’ Signal in the Global Climate Monitoring Network

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Recent winter-weather related airport delays have become something that airport managers and airline executive want to solve. This story from NBC’s today show back in January 2018 highlights the issue and a potential solution:


Could heated airport runways melt away your winter travel headaches?

There have been thousands of flight delays and cancellations due to winter weather this year, and it’s only January. Not only that: snow and ice at airports can send planes skidding off slippery runways.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #298

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

Frigid Weather: Since Christmas North America, east of the Rockies, has been very cold. In addition, the Atlantic Seaboard experienced an intense Nor’easter that brought rain, ice, and snow from Georgia to New England. Climate change alarmists are attempting to blame the cold on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. How CO2 may cause a cooling of the earth is not clearly established in physical theory. Government funded entities, such as NOAA, that rely on numerical models, did not predict the cold more than a few days in advance. Yet, a private entity, WeatherBELL Analytics, was warning of a cold year-end as early as October.

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The Cruelest Tax Of All

[This is a companion piece to the previous post.]

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

A “progressive” tax is one where the wealthier you are the higher percentage of tax you pay. On the other hand, I’ve said before that a tax on energy, the so-called “carbon tax”, is one of the most regressive taxes available. It is the reverse of progressive, it hits the poor the hardest. This is because poor people spend a larger percentage of their income on energy than do rich people.

Someone challenged me on this claim about energy taxes the other day, and I realized I believed it without ever checking it … bad Willis, no cookies. So of course, having had that thought I had to take a look.

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The Average American Today Is Richer than John D. Rockefeller

By   – Re-Blogged From The Foundation for Economic Education

This Atlantic story reveals how Americans lived 100 years ago. By the standards of a middle-class American today, that lifestyle was poor, inconvenient, dreary, and dangerous. (Only a few years later — in 1924 — the 16-year-old son of a sitting US president would die of an infected blister that the boy got on his toe while playing tennis on the White House grounds.)

So here’s a question that I’ve asked in one form or another on earlier occasions, but that is so probing that I ask it again: What is the minimum amount of money that you would demand in exchange for your going back to live even as John D. Rockefeller lived in 1916?

21.7 million 2016 dollars (which are about one million 1916 dollars)? Would that do it? What about a billion 2016 — or 1916 — dollars? Would this sizable sum of dollars be enough to enable you to purchase a quantity of high-quality 1916 goods and services that would at least make you indifferent between living in 1916 America and living (on your current income) in 2016 America?

Think about it. Hard. Carefully.

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