Aussie Federal Senator Defends Call to Leave the Paris Agreement

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

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Claim: “Bath Sponge” Metal Organic Material Makes Climate Friendly Hydrogen Automobiles Viable

Hindenburg Hydrogen Explosion Disaster
Last time someone tried to create a Hydrogen economy – the Hindenburg Hydrogen Explosion Disaster – By Gus Pasquerella – http://www.lakehurst.navy.mil/nlweb/images/1213d.gif, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=632191

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BBC: Blend 20% Hydrogen in Natural Gas to Reduce Home CO2 Emissions

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Last time someone tried to create a Hydrogen economy – the Hindenburg Hydrogen Explosion Disaster – By Gus Pasquerella – http://www.lakehurst.navy.mil/nlweb/images/1213d.gif, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=632191

BBC’s Roger Harrabin and Keele University thinks it would be a great idea to pump vast quantities of hydrogen into people’s homes, to reduce CO2 emissions from gas powered appliances.

Hindenburg Hydrogen Explosion Disaster

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Scientists Extract Hydrogen Gas From Oil and Bitumen, Giving Potential Pollution-Free Energy

Scientists have developed a large-scale economical method to extract hydrogen (H2) from oil sands (natural bitumen) and oil fields. This can be used to power hydrogen-powered vehicles, which are already marketed in some countries, as well as to generate electricity; hydrogen is regarded as an efficient transport fuel, similar to petrol and diesel, but with no pollution problems. The process can extract hydrogen from existing oil sands reservoirs, with huge existing supplies found in Canada and Venezuela. Interestingly, this process can be applied to mainstream oil fields, causing them to produce hydrogen instead of oil.

Hydrogen powered vehicles, including cars, buses, and trains, have been in development for many years. These vehicles have been acknowledged to be efficient, but the high price of extracting the Hydrogen from oil reserves has meant that the technology has not been economically viable. Now a group of Canadian engineers have developed a cheap method of extracting H2 from oil sands. They are presenting this work at the Goldschmidt Geochemistry Conference in Barcelona.

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How Power-to-Gas Technology Can Be Green and Profitable

Re-Blogged From Eureka Alert

Economists map out economically viable path to renewables-based hydrogen production

Hydrogen production based on wind power can already be commercially viable today. Until now, it was generally assumed that this environmentally friendly power-to-gas technology could not be implemented profitably. Economists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the University of Mannheim and Stanford University have now described, based on the market situations in Germany and Texas, how flexible production facilities could make this technology a key component in the transition of the energy system.

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Climate Change Friendly “Clean Gas” Movement Gathers Momentum

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Green plan to make natural gas from US fracking operations really expensive and dangerous.

Reenvisioning The Role For Natural Gas In A Clean Energy Future

Clean” gas, or hydrogen sourced from natural gas, represents an alternative that has been receiving increased attention.

Hindenburg Hydrogen Explosion Disaster

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New Catalyst Produces Cheap Hydrogen

From Eurekalert – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Public Release: 29-Nov-2018

New catalyst produces cheap hydrogen

[Of course, the round trip from water to hydrogen to water (generating electricity) is less than 100%, as would be expected with any energy storage scheme. -Bob]

Queensland University of Technology

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Caption A new water-splitting catalyst material produce hydrogen cheaply without fossil fuels Credit QUT: Ummul Sultana Usage Restrictions Media use only.

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Nano Aluminium Offers Fuel Cells on Demand – Just Add Water

By David Hambling – Re-Blogged From New Scientist

The accidental discovery of a novel aluminium alloy that reacts with water in a highly unusual way may be the first step to reviving the struggling hydrogen economy. It could offer a convenient and portable source of hydrogen for fuel cells and other applications, potentially transforming the energy market and providing an alternative to batteries and liquid fuels.

“The important aspect of the approach is that it lets you make very compact systems,” says Anthony Kucernak, who studies fuel cells at Imperial College London and wasn’t involved with the research. “That would be very useful for systems which need to be very light or operate for long periods on hydrogen, where the use of hydrogen stored in a cylinder is prohibitive.”

Refuelling hydrogen vehicle
Hydrogen could provide an alternative to battery power

Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty