Illinois Bankruptcy Acknowledged by the Mainstream Media

By Joe Scudder – Re-Blogged From Eagle Rising

The fact that Illinois bankruptcy is practically inevitable finally gets reported on.

There are signs of Illinois bankruptcy everywhere. The gridlock in the state legislature may be a cause of it, but it is more significant as a symptom. The Democrat-dominated system has broken down because there is no money left. The usual compromises don’t work anymore because they cost too much.

Another sign is that both Powerball and Mega Millions are halting business in Illinois because the state can’t afford to pay off winners. They’re afraid continuing in Illinois will wreck their reputations.

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Falling Rocks In The Promised Land

By Gary Christenson – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Yes, traumatic market events (falling rocks) occur, even though markets are “managed,” statistics are manipulated, and politicians pretend to care about something besides their next election.

From John P. Hussman, Ph.D. Fair Value and Bubbles: 2017 Edition

“Unfortunately, investors seem to have concluded that central bank easing is omnipotent, despite the fact that the Fed eased persistently and aggressively, to no effect, through the entire course of 2000-2002 and 2007-2009 market collapses.”

From Bill Gross: Bill Gross Says Market Risk is Highest Since Pre-2008 Crisis

“Central bank policies for low-and-negative-interest rates are artificially driving up asset prices while creating little growth in the real economy and punishing individual savers, banks, and insurance companies, according to Gross.”

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Government Insolvency Gets Harder to Ignore

By Clint Siegner – Re-Blogged From https://www.moneymetals.com

Several U.S. states and the federal government are hopelessly insolvent. It’s something many bullion investors have known for years.

The real question is when this reality will pierce the mainstream illusion that deficits, and the crushing pile of debt which accompany them, don’t matter. That moment drew closer last week when ratings agencies downgraded Illinois state bonds to one notch above “junk” status.

S&P and Moody’s dropped the state’s creditworthiness rating to BB+/Baa3 – the lowest ever for a U.S. state. Illinois currently has $14.5 billion in unpaid bills and a government deadlocked over forming a new budget.

That stack of bills represents a whopping 40% of the state’s operating budget. At the heart of Illinois’ problems are massive union pension obligations for retired government bureaucrats.

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The Great Illinois Gold Rush!

By Gary Christenson – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

There is no gold rush in Illinois.  The important question is, “Why Not?”

Per Mike Shedlock (Mish) here and here:

  • “Illinois is in serious financial trouble.”
  • “Illinois has no current budget.”
  • “The reality is Illinois is flat-out broke.”

The State Comptroller estimates that the backlog of unpaid bills will exceed $10 Billion by December.  Worse, “In January [2015], Illinois’ total cumulative liability was $159 Billion.”

“Pay-Later Budgeting” has not worked.  “… the state of Illinois has run deficits in every fiscal year since 2001.”  The state borrowed, sold assets, underfunded retirement plans, borrowed even more money to fund retirement plans and yet pretended all was well.

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Why We Can’t Handle An Equities Bear Market, Part 1: State Budgets Will Implode

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From http://www.DollarCollapse.com

Back when society’s balance sheet was reasonably solid, the occasional bear market was no big deal. A 20% drop in the average S&P 500 stock would scare investors and lead to slight declines in consumer spending and government capital gains tax revenue, but the overall economy would barely notice such a minor speed bump.

But that was then. Like a person with an impaired immune system, today’s developed world is so highly leveraged that a shock of any kind risks catastrophic complications. Which is why governments and central banks now meet every incipient crisis with quick infusions of newly-created cash and lower interest rates. We can’t risk letting markets be markets any more.

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