Who Pays What in Taxes?

   By Walter E Williams – Re-Blogged From The Patriot Post

Politicians exploit public ignorance. Few areas of public ignorance provide as many opportunities for political demagoguery as taxation. Today some politicians argue that the rich must pay their fair share and label the proposed changes in tax law as tax cuts for the rich. Let’s look at who pays what, with an eye toward attempting to answer this question: Are the rich paying their fair share?

According to the latest IRS data, the payment of income taxes is as follows. The top 1 percent of income earners, those having an adjusted annual gross income of $480,930 or higher, pay about 39 percent of federal income taxes. That means about 892,000 Americans are stuck with paying 39 percent of all federal taxes. The top 10 percent of income earners, those having an adjusted gross income over $138,031, pay about 70.6 percent of federal income taxes (https://tinyurl.com/yddvee2o). About 1.7 million Americans, less than 1 percent of our population, pay 70.6 percent of federal income taxes. Is that fair, or do you think they should pay more? By the way, earning $500,000 a year doesn’t make one rich. It’s not even yacht money.

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Seattle’s ‘Tax-the-Rich’ Measure Spurs Freedom Foundation Lawsuit

By Rob Williams – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

The Freedom Foundation, a conservative think tank, sued Seattle after its city council passed a measure in July that would place a 2.25 percent income tax on wealthier residents.

The tax was estimated to affect the 9,000, or 2 percent, of the city’s taxpayers – people who make more than $250,000, or $500,000 for couples filing jointly.

The lawsuit, filed on behalf of 19 Seattle citizens, alleges the proposed tax violates the state constitution and restrictions on cities to impose income taxes, The Wall Street Journal reported. Another group called the Opportunity for All Coalition, founded by Seattle venture capitalist Matt McIlwain, filed a lawsuit the same day, the newspaper said.

Image: WSJ: Seattle's 'Tax-the-Rich' Measure Spurs Freedom Foundation Lawsuit

Taxes Don’t Need to be Reformed, They Need to be CUT

By Ron Paul – Re-Blogged From Eagle Rising

Many Americans who have wrestled with a 1040 form, or who have paid someone to prepare their taxes, no doubt cheered the news that Congress will soon resume working on tax reform. However, taxpayers should temper their enthusiasm because, even in the unlikely event tax collection is simplified, tax reform will not reduce the American people’s tax burden.

Congressional leadership’s one nonnegotiable requirement of any tax reform is “revenue neutrality.” So any tax reform plan that has any chance of even being considered, much less passed, by Congress must ensure that the federal government does not lose a nickel in tax revenue. Congress’s obsession with protecting the government’s coffers causes reformers to mix tax cuts with tax increases. Congress’s insistence on “offsetting” tax cuts with tax increases creates a political food fight where politicians face off over who should have their taxes raised, who should have their taxes cut, and who should have their taxes stay the same.

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Hate Taxes? You Certainly Are Not Alone…

By Michael Snyder – Re-Blogged From http://freedomoutpost.com

At this time of the year, millions of Americans are rushing to file their taxes at the last minute, and we are once again reminded just how nightmarish our system of taxation has become.  I studied tax law when I was in law school, and it is one of the most mind-numbing areas of study that you could possibly imagine.  At this point, the U.S. tax code is somewhere around 4 million words long, which is more than four times longer than all of William Shakespeare’s works put together.  And even if you could somehow read the entire tax code, it is constantly changing, and so those that prepare taxes for a living are constantly relearning the rules.  It has been said that Americans spend more than 6 billion hours preparing their taxes each year, and Politifact has rated this claim as true.  We have a system that is as ridiculous as it is absurd, and the truth is that we don’t even need it.  In fact, the greatest period of economic growth in all of U.S. history was when there was no income tax at all.  Why anyone would want to perpetuate this tortuous system is beyond me, and yet we keep sending politicians to Washington D.C. that just keep making this system even more complicated and even more burdensome.

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How Trump Can Realign American Politics

By David Stockman – Re-Blogged From Stockmans Contra Corner

It’s actually pretty easy. At an apt moment very soon, Trump should offer Governor Kasich the VP slot and Senator Cruz the vacant Supreme Court seat.

Such a grand bargain would not only clear the primary field and quash any backroom hijacking of the nomination by the Washington GOP establishment; it would also permit each man to play his highest and best role at this great inflection point in the nation’s history.

That is, Donald Trump’s job is to destroy the Republican/Neocon establishment and bring working class America back into a modern version of a McKinley-style Republican Party. Ted Cruz’ task is to spend a lifetime bringing strict constructionism back to the high court, thereby helping to restore constitutional restraints on a leviathan state that fundamentally threatens personal liberty and economic freedom and prosperity in America.

And, yes, there really isn’t much for a washed-out, me-too Republican pol like Kasich to do at all. Except to get out of the way and exercise his apparent talent for preacherly uplift as America’s eulogist-in-chief at foreign state funerals.

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Why We Can’t Handle An Equities Bear Market, Part 1: State Budgets Will Implode

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From http://www.DollarCollapse.com

Back when society’s balance sheet was reasonably solid, the occasional bear market was no big deal. A 20% drop in the average S&P 500 stock would scare investors and lead to slight declines in consumer spending and government capital gains tax revenue, but the overall economy would barely notice such a minor speed bump.

But that was then. Like a person with an impaired immune system, today’s developed world is so highly leveraged that a shock of any kind risks catastrophic complications. Which is why governments and central banks now meet every incipient crisis with quick infusions of newly-created cash and lower interest rates. We can’t risk letting markets be markets any more.

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Job Growth Twice as High in Red States

Re-Blogged From http://www.Newsmax.com

Each day between 2003 and 2013, an average of 830 Americans relocated to one of the nine U.S. states with no state income tax, while 944 people moved out of the nine states with the highest personal income tax rates.

That’s one of the findings disclosed in a new report from The Heritage Foundation, “1,000 People a Day: Why Red States Are Getting Richer and Blue States Poorer.”

States in recent years have divided into two camps, which the report’s authors call the “red state model” and the “blue state model.”

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