Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #352

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org, The Science and Environmental Policy Project

By Ken Haapala, President

Changing Seas: Sea level specialists Nils-Axel Mörner, Thomas Wysmuller, and Albert Parker posted comments on ResearchGate stating TWTW’s comments on sea level rise were too superficial to be useful. Fortunately, Tallbloke posted the section of TWTW and the comments, so they can be easily viewed by all. The objective of TWTW is to be understandable by the competent reader, not to appeal to specialists or to be a scientific journal. Above all, it is not the last word in anything.

Of particular concern have been the claims of multi-foot and multi-meter increases in sea levels endangering coastal cities of the US. These claims have been made by employees of NOAA and by lead authors of the latest full Assessment Report (AR-5, 2014) of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The recent effort by the cities of Oakland and San Francisco to sue ExxonMobil illustrates how these highly questionable claims are being used in litigation in hopes of collecting huge legal awards that are unjustified.

Continue reading

Advertisements

European CO2 Emissions Don’t Matter

By Edwin Timmer, De Telegraaf – Re-Blogged From GWPF

To tackle global climate change it is far more important that fast-growing developing countries do more than any well-intentioned steps in the Netherlands. “In fact, European emissions don’t matter,” says British climate scientist Nic Lewis.

“What really matters is: what happens in developing countries such as China, India, Indonesia, Brazil and Nigeria”, says Lewis, who gave a presentation at De Groene Rekenkamer Foundation this week in Amsterdam. According to him, it is much more important that developing countries quickly become richer and how rising CO2 emissions that this entails can be limited.

Continue reading

Conflict Over Kashmir Risks Nuclear Winter

By Arkadiusz Sieroń – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Many important things happened yesterday. Cohen testified before the Congress, the US-North Korea Summit took place, while tensions between India and Pakistan escalated. Will these developments boost gold?

India and Pakistan Engage in Another Conflict over Kashmir

India and Pakistan are once again squaring off over the disputed region of Kashmir. It began with the suicide attack in Indian-administered Kashmir, which killed more than 40 people. As the Pakistan-based militant group Jaish-e-Mohammed claimed responsibility for the bombing, India retaliated and launched air strikes inside Pakistan, the first aerial attacks across the Line of Control dividing both countries since 1971. The results of these strikes are not confirmed. However, we know that two Indian jets were shot down and Pakistan army captured one pilot.

Continue reading

Paris Agreement Fan Laments Massive Fossil Fuel Powered Industrialisation in Bangladesh

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Greens attacking Bangladeshis for trying to build a better future for their children.

From Paris to Bangladesh, how the climate change accord is imploding

By Divya Rajagopal

The onslaught of a new power plant on the fragile ecology of the Sunderbans is fresh proof of the futility of climate reforms. A ground report from ET.

Until two years ago, 28-year-old Sajjad Hossain Tuhin, a student of forestry, would walk up to the banks of the River Rupsa in Khulna, Bangladesh, to capture the moment of dusk, when the setting sun left the sky lit up like fireworks. In romantic Bengali literature, it is described as the moment to catch a glimpse of a new bride. But Tuhin doesn’t do this anymore. The sun now sets behind the boundary of an upcoming LNG power plant. The banks of the Rupsa are astir with vehicles ferrying rocks and cement to speed up the completion of the plant that will fire up Bangladesh’s economic growth.

Continue reading

Trump Promises Citizenship Path for Skilled Workers from Outside U.S.

By Agence France-Presse – Re-Blogged From Liberty Headlines

‘Rest assured that changes are soon coming which will bring both simplicity and certainty to your stay…’

Trump Promises Citizenship Path for Skilled Workers

Tech workers are increasingly moving from the United States to Canada due to the hassle in obtaining H1-B visas/PHOTO: AFP

(AFP) President Donald Trump said Friday he would make it easier for top-skilled workers to stay in the United States and become citizens.

Trump pledged to reform coveted H1-B visas, for which three-quarters of applicants are from India, most of them in the technology sector.

“H1-B holders in the United States can rest assured that changes are soon coming which will bring both simplicity and certainty to your stay, including a potential path to citizenship,” Trump tweeted.

“We want to encourage talented and highly skilled people to pursue career options in the U.S.”

Continue reading

Gold – A Perfect Storm For 2019

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From GoldMoney

This article is an overview of the principal factors likely to drive the gold price in 2019. It looks at the global factors that have developed in 2018 for both gold and the dollar, how geopolitics are likely to evolve, the economic outlook and how it is worsened for the dollar by President Trump’s tariff war against China, the availability and likely demand for bullion, and the technical position in paper markets. Taken together, the outlook is bullish for gold.

2018 reprise

For gold bulls, 2018 was disappointing. From 11 December 2017, when gold made a significant bottom against the dollar at $1243, it has ended virtually unchanged today, after being 4.2% up. Gold had to struggle against a rising dollar, whose trade-weighted index rose a net 3.7% over the same period, and as much as 9.4% from its mid-February low.

Continue reading

The State of Shale Gas and Oil in the U.S.A. Today

By Andy May – Re-Blogged From WUWT

A few news items from The Shale Gas News, by Bill desRosiers of Cabot Oil & Gas. The main paragraphs below are adapted from desRosiers, but I’ve added some detail. Things are looking very good for the U.S. oil, gas and coal industries.