Trump’s Tax Cuts: The Good, The Bad, and the Inflationary

By Stefan Gleason – Re-Blogged From Money Metals Exchange

At last, tax reform is happening! Last week, President Donald Trump celebrated the passage of the most important legislation so far of his presidency.

The final bill falls far short of the “file on a postcard” promise of Trump’s campaign. It even falls short of the bill trotted out by Congressional Republicans just a few weeks ago. It is, nevertheless, the most significant tax overhaul in more than a decade.

Corporations and most individual taxpayers will see lower overall rates. That’s the good news.

Unfortunately, there is also some not so good news investors need to be aware of.

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Out Of Money By November 29th

By Dan Amerman – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

“Social Security benefit indexing is not only not based on retiree expenses – but quite ironically, it is designed to exclude retiree expenses.”

In this analysis we will combine two “technicalities” that many people have probably never even thought about, and show how in combination and over the course of a retirement – they can completely change our day to day quality of life.

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Year-End Rate Hike

By Mark O’Byrne – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

FOMC follows through on much anticipated rate-hike of 0.25%
– Spot gold responds by heading for biggest gain in three weeks, rising by over 1%
– Final meeting for Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen
– Yellen does not expect Trump’s tax-cut package to result in significant, strong growth for US economy
– No concern for bitcoin which ‘plays a very small role in the payment system’

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Inflation Roars as Producer Prices Jump Most in 6 Years

By Thomson Reuters – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

U.S. producer prices rose in November as gasoline prices surged and the cost of other goods increased, leading to the largest annual gain in nearly six years.

The fairly strong report from the Labor Department on Tuesday suggested a broad acceleration in wholesale price pressures, which could assuage concerns among some Federal Reserve officials over persistently low inflation.

“This demand-led price push from higher commodity prices is a classic early warning signal that consumer goods will also see increasing inflationary pressures,” said Chris Rupkey, chief economist at MUFG in New York. Continue reading

Out Of Money By December 12th – Social Security Partial Inflation Indexing (Part 2)

By Daniel Amerman – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Most advice on long-term planning for retirement and Social Security benefits is based on the assumption that Social Security will fully keep up with inflation. As we are establishing in this series of analyses, the full inflation indexing of Social Security is a myth and there are major implications for standard of living in retirement as well as the associated decisions with regard to both Social Security and investment planning.

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Goldman: Highest Stock Valuations Since 1900 Mean ‘Fast Pain’ Coming

By Bloomberg – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

A prolonged bull market across stocks, bonds and credit has left a measure of average valuation at the highest since 1900, a condition that at some point is going to translate into pain for investors, according to Goldman Sachs Group Inc.

“It has seldom been the case that equities, bonds and credit have been similarly expensive at the same time, only in the Roaring ’20s and the Golden ’50s,” Goldman Sachs International strategists including Christian Mueller-Glissman wrote in a note this week.

Image: Goldman: Highest Stock Valuations Since 1900 Mean 'Fast Pain' Coming

Soaring Deficits Force Treasury into Foolish Gamble

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From http://www.pentoport.com

As mentioned last week in Part I, the U.S. National debt is now at a record $20.5 trillion. And the first month of fiscal 2018 showed a deficit increase of nearly 38% over fiscal 2017. The total amount of Non-Financial Debt is up nearly $15 trillion during the 2007-2017 timeframe. In addition, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York reported that household debt totaled $13 trillion in the third quarter ended September 30th, which is a record high and the 13th straight quarterly increase. And, CNBC recently reported that the debt of nonfinancial corporations has grown by $1 trillion in just the last two years and now totals over $8.7 trillion, which is also a record 45% of GDP.

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