A Textbook Case of Inflation for College Students

By Megan Zogby – Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

As college textbook prices have increased 88 percent since 2006, education reformers wonder how universities can make books more affordable. One simple thing they could do is to stop selling textbooks with absurdly high mark-ups, the difference between the cost incurred by the bookstore for textbooks and the price at which they’re sold. While some progress has been made within the UNC system, much room for improvement remains.

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, for example, signed a contract with Barnes and Noble in 2009 to merge its university bookstore with Barnes and Noble. That conjunction promised students lower book prices, bringing down the mark-up from 23 percent to 18 percent. However, merging the bookstore has meant that students still pay higher prices than they would if they bought books from an online competitor or the book publisher. The rationale for the merger may have been affordability, but textbooks remain expensive for students who trust UNC-Charlotte’s bookstore to offer the best price.

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Margaret Thatcher: The Woman Who Saved Great Britain

Niall Ferguson

You’ve heard her name. You might even have seen a film about her. Bhttps://www.prageru.com/video/margaret-thatcher-the-woman-who-saved-great-britain/ut do you know the whole story of Margaret Thatcher – where she came from, what she stood for, and the impact she had on Great Britain and the world? Renowned historian Niall Ferguson explains how the Iron Lady earned her status as one of the most important and influential women of the 20th century.

Please watch the VIDEO.

CONTINUE READING –>https://www.prageru.com/video/margaret-thatcher-the-woman-who-saved-great-britain/

Inflation: Dead Or Alive?

By GE Christenson – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Breaking news: Silver briefly reached $18.00 and closed at $17.85. The DOW rose again to 28,645.

Inflation, Deflation, Stagflation, and Hyperinflation? So What?

Inflation: The banking cartel demands inflation of the currency supply. The cartel encourages massive debt and collects the interest and fees. They want inflation because it increases debt and repayment is easier. With global debt at $250 trillion, the cartel is successful.

Governments account for a large percentage of global debt. They spend more, buy votes, feed currency units to cronies, and borrow to cover the revenue shortfall. Inflation makes the debt load easier to tolerate.

Corporations want mild inflation to boost revenues, profits and stock prices.

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The Naughty List and Grizzly Bears

The official US national debt in 1913 was $2.91 billion. In 1971, when President Nixon lied about temporarily disconnecting gold from the dollar, the official national debt was $398 billion.

By 2019 the official national debt has grown to $23,000 billion.

Politicians borrow and spend to reward cronies and buy votes. They also increase their personal wealth. Human nature changes slowly.

From 1913 to 2019 the national debt increased at a compounded rate of 8.8% per year. From 1971 to 2019 the debt also increased at 8.8% per year. This 106-year trend appears stable and likely to continue.

Can you name three congressmen or one lobbyist who advocate spending fewer currency units next year? Nope! Debt will grow exponentially.

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Statistical Misdirection

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Economists who understand credit cycles expect the current cycle to enter its crisis stage at any moment. Furthermore, it combines with increasing trade tariffs between the two largest economies to echo the conditions that led to the 1929-32 Wall Street crash and the subsequent depression.

With the dollar tied to gold, there was no doubt about how the collapse in demand affected asset, commodity and consumer prices ninety years ago. If the turn of the current cycle leads to a similar outcome, it is unlikely to be properly reflected in official statistics for GDP.

This article explains why GDP is a statistical fallacy, and the use of an inflation deflator is not only inappropriate but has been manipulated to produce an outcome that wrongly attributes success to monetary policies. Therefore, if an economic slump follows the coming credit crisis, it is unlikely to be reflected in these key government statistics.

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Last Hawk Flew To Heaven

By Arkadiusz Sieroń – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Tall Paul Has Gone

A great man passed away. Literally. Paul Volcker – who died on Monday, probably due to prostate cancer complications, at 92 – stood 6 feet and 7 inches high, or more than 2 meters. But Volcker’s impressive height wasn’t the only thing he could boast of. Our Readers are aware that we are not fans of central bankers, but we have to admit that Volcker not only literally but also figuratively cast a long shadow across the Fed, standing out by both past and current standards.

First of all, Volcker was probably the last Fed Chair that we could even remotely describe as the monetary hawk ready to fight inflation. As David Stockman wrote

Volcker accomplished this true anti-inflation objective with alacrity. By curtailing the Fed’s balance sheet growth rate to less than 5 percent by 1982, Volcker convinced the markets that the Fed would not continue to passively validate inflation, as Burns and Miller had done, and that speculating on rising prices was no longer a one-way bet. Volcker thus cracked the inflation spiral through a display of central bank resolve, not through a single-variable focus on a rubbery monetary statistic called M1.

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End Of An Epoch

By Keith Weiner – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

“There is no subtler, no surer means of overturning the existing basis of society than to debauch the currency. The process engages all the hidden forces of economic law on the side of destruction, and does it in a manner which not one man in a million is able to diagnose.”

What the heck did John Maynard Keynes mean by saying this? Overturning the existing basis of society?! Let’s begin by stating something that is both obvious and unpopular. We are living in days that could be called the end of an epoch. The signs are everywhere, and becoming more blatant.

Wealth Inequality

The Left focuses on wealth inequality, because they see one of the signs. The falling interest rate seemingly benefits those who own assets (it does not actually benefit anyone), particularly those who finance assets with dirt-cheap credit. And it harms wage-earners, by incentivizing businesses to borrow cheap to buy capital goods to replace labor.

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