Why the Democrats Will Lose on Climate Change

By David Middleton- Re-Blogged From WUWT

4 inconvenient truths about climate change

Noah Millman

September 7, 2019

At this week’s climate symposium on CNN, Elizabeth Warren answered a question about whether the government should be regulating lightbulbs in an interesting way. She said, basically, that we’re focusing on the wrong thing. There’s nothing wrong with more efficient lightbulbs, but it’s small beer. That’s what the fossil fuel companies want us to be arguing about, because most of the carbon is thrown up by three industries — construction, electric power, and oil — and arguing about lightbulbs takes attention away from those sectors.

The obvious inconvenient truth that Warren is pointing out here is that we aren’t going to be able to fight climate change with a series of small-change consumer choices. It’s going to require massive changes in large industries, which is a heavier political lift. Below the radar, there’s another inconvenient truth being implied: that people are really irritated by losing even small conveniences, and so focusing energy on these small-beer fights has a real cost in terms of being able to fight the bigger fights.

Continue reading

Will The US Economy Fall Into Recession? Or Will It Accelerate?

By Arkadiusz Sieroń – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The current economic expansion has just equaled with the longest boom in the US history. Is that not suspicious? We invite you to read our today’s article, which provide you with the valuable lessons from the 1990s expansion for the gold market and find out whether the US economy will die of old age.

Lessons from the 1990s Expansion for the Economy and the Gold Market

The current economic expansion has just equaled with the longest boom in the US history. Unless the sky falls in the next few weeks, we will celebrate a new record in July. Is that not suspicious?

Continue reading

Frac’ing Goes Green

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

This morning, Charles passed a couple of articles on to me about electric fracking. One was from a WUWT Tip submission by RonPE and the other was in an email he received. My first thought was that it might be referring to the use of microwaves to free kerogen from oil shale… Alas, it was just referring to regular old frac’ing using gas turbines, rather than diesel engines to run the pumps.

From The Houston Carbuncle

BUSINESS // ENERGY
Baker Hughes chooses Permian Basin to debut ‘electric frack’ technology

Sergio Chapa April 30, 2019

Houston oilfield service company Baker Hughes is using the Permian Basin in West Texas to debut a fleet of new turbines that use excess natural gas from a drilling site to power hydraulic fracturing equipment — reducing flaring, carbon dioxide emissions, people and equipment in remote locations.

Continue reading

Nonmonetary Cause Of Lower Prices

By Keith Weiner – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Over the past several weeks, we have debunked the idea that purchasing power—i.e. what a dollar can buy—is intrinsic to the currency itself. We have discussed a large non-monetary force that drives up prices. Governments at every level force producers to add useless ingredients, via regulation, taxation, labor law, environmentalism, etc. These are ingredients that the consumer does not value, and often does not even know are included in the production process. However, these useless ingredients can get quite expensive, especially in industries that are heavily regulated such as health care.

What Force Pushes Prices Down?

There is another non-monetary force, and this one is pushing prices down. Producers are constantly finding useless ingredients that they can remove. In the research for his Forbes article on falling wages, Keith discovered that dairy producers found ways to eliminate 90% of the ingredients that go into producing milk between 1965 and 2012. For example, they reduced by two thirds the labor hours that support each cow.

Continue reading

New Idea Could Revolutionize the Electric Power Industry

Re-Blogged From WUWT

University of Cincinnati researchers have developed a more efficient air-cooling system for power plants

University of Cincinnati researchers say they have found a solution to one of the biggest environmental problems facing the energy industry: water consumption.

The William H. Zimmer Power Station, located near Moscow, Ohio, is a 1.35-gigawatt (1,351 MW) coal power plant. Planned by Cincinnati Gas and Electric (CG&E) draws cooling water from the Ohio River.

Continue reading

Vision

By Leronard E ead – Re-Blogged From FEE

Where there is no vision, the people perish.

—PROVERBS 29:18

Vision is the blessing of foresight, but it has no chance of realization without its companion blessing, insight. In the absence of these twin attainments—each within our reach—the people perish, that is, they vegetate rather than germinate, stagnate instead of growing in awareness, perception, consciousness. Vision, therefore—the power of penetrating to reality by mental acuteness—must be developed if our role in human destiny is to be fulfilled.

Continue reading

This Robotic Warehouse Fills Orders in Five Minutes, and Fits in City Centers

By  – Re-Blogged From Singularity Hub

Shopping is becoming less and less of a consumer experience—or, for many, less of a chore—as the list of things that can be bought online and delivered to our homes grows to include, well, almost anything you can think of. An Israeli startup is working to make shopping and deliveries even faster and cheaper—and they’re succeeding.

rows of shelves goods in boxes modern industry

Apple must show what’s next after iPhone X

By Vitaliy Katsenelson – Re-Blogged From http://contrarianedge.com

The iPhone X is likely to be a phenomenal success for Apple. But its success will not be driven by anything new that the new phone packs inside. Instead, its success will be based on the phone’s screen size. Essentially, iPhone X provides the same screen real-estate as an iPhone Plus, but with the sleeker form factor of the iPhone 7 or 8.

Apple has done a great job at changing the paradigm of our thinking about the iPhone. If you only care about making phone calls, then an iPhone 4 is good enough. Why pay for more? You probably don’t even need to upgrade your phone for years, as long as the battery keeps holding its charge. However, for most, the actual “phone” function is the least important of the iPhone.

Continue reading

How to Rebuild a First World Economy

By David Hunter – Re-Blogged From iPatriot

We’ve indulged in this fiction that we can build a vibrant economy by deregulating the financial sector, and cutting taxes, and putting off investments in things like infrastructure and education and our kids. But we can’t anymore. And now we have to ask the question about what really went wrong.” Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), from Rana Foroohar’s “Makers and Takers” (2016)

To solve this pressing and systemic problem, the last place to look for insight is to any big government progressive like Elizabeth Warren. Likewise, to her fellow travelers of Congress’s spendthrift establishment (of both parties). In truth, the insulated beltway bubble has no clue regarding what fundamentally remains wrong with America’s economy.

Continue reading

In China, Innovation Cuts Both Ways

By Matthew Bey – Re-Blogged From https://worldview.stratfor.com

China is in a bind. The heavy industry that propelled the country’s economy through three decades of dizzying growth has reached its limits. To escape the dreaded middle-income trap, China will need to shift its focus from low-end manufacturing to other economic industries, namely the technology sector. Beijing has put tech at the center of its long-term economic strategy through campaigns such as Made in China 2025 and Internet Plus. But these initiatives alone won’t push the Chinese economy past its current plateau. The tech sector is notorious for relentless innovation. And innovation requires flexibility.

Continue reading

Can Trump Get 3 Percent Growth?

By Peter Morici – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

President Donald Trump’s economic team paints a rosier picture about what his policies could accomplish than the economics profession is willing to endorse.

His team is formulating budget and tax proposals that project 3 percent annual growth, while the number crunchers at the Congressional Budget Office estimate only 1.9 percent.

How fast the economy can grow comes down to the simple sum of likely worker productivity and labor force growth. Since the financial crisis, productivity has advanced about 1 percent a year, as compared to the 2 percent in prior decades.

Continue reading

Tech Experts Disagree Wildly on the Future Impact of AI

By Tom Ward – Re-Blogged From Futurism

In Brief
  • Elon Musk has given a doomsday prophecy on the topic of AI, going as far as to invest $1 billion into researching how to use it safely.
  • Other experts have different perspectives on the future of AI, but all are agreed that this is an important topic, and how we use this powerful technology must be thoroughly thought through.

The AI Debate

Our technology prophets are talking in the lexicon of magic, gods, and monsters when it comes to artificial intelligence (AI). They predict every scenario from utopias to apocalypses, overlords to angels.

Continue reading

Scientists Are Using CRISPR To “Program” Living Cells

By Dom Galeon – Re-Blogged From Futurism

Scientists from the University of Washington have constructed digital logic gates in living cells. Though they’re not the first to do so, the researchers’ living circuitry is the largest and most complex of any created thus far.

Living Circuits

Thanks to projects like Elon Musk’s Neuralink, a future in which humankind merges with machines is on everyone’s minds. While a brain computer interface (BCI) like the one Musk is proposing would involve making a computer function as part of a human body, other researchers are taking an opposite route. Instead of making machines that can imitate biology, they’re looking for ways to make biological systems function more like computers.

Continue reading

Exacerbating the Business Cycle

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

I recommend a recent article to you, “The Origin of Cycles,” by Alasdair Macleod. The author describes several characteristics of business cycles and some causes. It is well worth reading. I would like to add to his presentation.

Business Cycles have been identified for several hundred years. Adam Smith in his The Wealth of Nations (241 years go!) discussed the Pig Cycle. Farmers noticing that then current prices supported a nice profit over current costs, expanded their herds. But then the expanded supply some time later caused pig prices to fall, which encouraged some pig farmers to reduce their herds. Reduced future supply raised prices allowing the cycle to repeat every 3-5 years.

Image result for pigs

Continue reading

Unraveling The Secular Stagnation Story

By Steven H Hanke – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Secular stagnation is said to be present when economic growth is negligible or nonexistent over a considerable span of time. Today, secular stagnation has become a popular mantra of the chattering classes, particularly in the United States. The idea is not new, however.

Alvin Hansen, an early and prominent Keynesian economist at Harvard University, popularized the notion of secular stagnation in the 1930s. In his presidential address to the American Economic Association in 1938, he asserted that the U.S. was a mature economy that was stuck in a rut. Hansen reasoned that technological innovations had come to an end; that the great American frontier (read: natural resources) was closed; and that population growth was stagnating. So, according to Hansen, investment opportunities would be scarce, and there would be nothing ahead except secular economic stagnation. The only way out was more government spending. It would be used to boost investment via public works projects. For Hansen and the Keynesians of that era, stagnation was a symptom of market failure, and the antidote was government largesse.

Continue reading

The Average American Today Is Richer than John D. Rockefeller

By   – Re-Blogged From The Foundation for Economic Education

This Atlantic story reveals how Americans lived 100 years ago. By the standards of a middle-class American today, that lifestyle was poor, inconvenient, dreary, and dangerous. (Only a few years later — in 1924 — the 16-year-old son of a sitting US president would die of an infected blister that the boy got on his toe while playing tennis on the White House grounds.)

So here’s a question that I’ve asked in one form or another on earlier occasions, but that is so probing that I ask it again: What is the minimum amount of money that you would demand in exchange for your going back to live even as John D. Rockefeller lived in 1916?

21.7 million 2016 dollars (which are about one million 1916 dollars)? Would that do it? What about a billion 2016 — or 1916 — dollars? Would this sizable sum of dollars be enough to enable you to purchase a quantity of high-quality 1916 goods and services that would at least make you indifferent between living in 1916 America and living (on your current income) in 2016 America?

Think about it. Hard. Carefully.

Continue reading

Nevada Passes Universal School Choice

Vouchers for everyone!

By Max Borders – Re-Blogged From the Foundation for Economic Education

Nevada is changing everything. According to the NRO,

Nevada governor Brian Sandoval [recently] signed into law the nation’s first universal school-choice program. That in and of itself is groundbreaking: The state has created an option open to every single public-school student.

Even better, this option improves upon the traditional voucher model, coming in the form of an education savings account (ESA) that parents control and can use to fully customize their children’s education.

Continue reading

Prices and the Standard of Living

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

Prices go up, and prices go down.

Winter clothes are in big demand this time of year (as we approach Thanksgiving), so you’ll pay top dollar. Fall clothes are just the opposite as we leave that season, and you’ll find highly discounted prices. Food prices rise and fall with the seasons, and prices for many other items also fluctuate with supply and demand.

That’s the way the Free Market works! As more of an item is demanded by consumers, the price will tend to rise (and vice versa). As more of a

Continue reading

More Jobs Through Less Regulation and Bureaucracy

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

The US needs more jobs.

While the headline unemployment rate shows the rate mostly recovered from the depths of the most recent Recession, by adding back in people who have given up hope of finding a job, plus those working part-time but really wanting full-time jobs, it shows US unemployment around 23% – at Great Depression levels.

Unemployment - ShadowStats

New business start-ups are a major source of new jobs, as well as being

Continue reading