Here’s How an Iranian Cyberattack Could Affect You

By Kristin Houser

The nation could attempt to take out American power grids — but probably won’t.

Almost immediately after the United States killed Iran’s top military general Qassim Suleimani, the Middle Eastern nation vowed to carry out “crushing revenge” for the slaying.

The internet took that to mean World War III was imminent — but it might not be a physical battle that the average American needs to worry about so much as a cyber one.

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How Watching TV Will Change in the 2020s

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

What will watching TV be like in the 2020s? Amid new gadgets and glitz, the CES tech show in Las Vegas aims to offer some answers, many of which boil down to more streaming and more efforts to glue you to your phone.

The show’s keynote addresses, once dominated by computer and chip makers, will this year feature executives from TV networks NBC and CBS and upstart video services like mobile-focused Quibi and free streamer Tubi. Topic one will be the streaming wars — not to mention mounting costs for consumers who want access to everything — as giants NBC Universal and WarnerMedia prepare to join the clash with Netflix later this year.

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In the Face of Climate Change, the Internet Is Unsustainable

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As far as environmental damage is concerned, our increasingly-online lives incur a massive toll.

If everything continues on its current course, then the internet is expected to generate about 20 percent of the world’s carbon emissions by 2030, according to The New Republic. That would make its environmental impact worse than any individual country on Earth, except for the U.S., China, or India.

In other words, our internet use is linked to a vicious cycle of environmental devastation, making it increasingly clear that something has to give.

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188 Internet Shutdowns In 2018

By Mark O’Byrne – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

– Internet’s “off switch” increasingly used to curb political and economic freedom
– Internet shutdowns were seen 188 times throughout the world in 2018 (see table)
– Democratic India experienced 154 internet shutdowns in just 30 months
– Technologically advanced EU countries Spain and Estonia experienced shutdowns
– Gallup poll shows people more worried about cybercrime than violent crime
– Governments use terrorism and war as reason for ‘internet kill switch’ powers
– Own physical coins and bars rather than ETF or digital gold on a single platform
– Internet shutdowns show physical gold is ultimate protection

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EU Committee Rules Could ‘Destroy The Internet As We Know It’

By Mac Slavo – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

A European Union committee has just approved rules that could “destroy the internet as we know it.” The two new and controversial rules change the dynamics of the internet and introduce wide-ranging new changes to the way the web works.

For starters, the rules, known as Article 11 and Article 13 could be used to “ban memes.” Article 13 has been criticized by campaigners who claim that it could force internet companies to ban all memes. It requires that all websites check posts against a database of copyrighted work, and remove those that are flagged. The reason many believe this could lead to a meme ban is that memes often use images taken from films or TV shows and could be removed by websites under article 13.  It’s just a convenient and propagandized way of making censorship sound better, though.

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‘Creative Destruction’ in 2018

By Ed Yardeni – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

The Great Disruption. The end of one year and start of the next is the perfect time to reflect and resolve to change for the better.

At the start of this year, the most popular resolutions involved the typical fare: the desire to get healthy, get organized, live life to the fullest, learn a new hobby, spend less or save more, travel and read more.

Philosophers like to wax poetic about change. Nuggets of wisdom include: “The only thing that is constant is change.” There’s also: “The more things change the more they stay the same.” And for the deep thinkers in the crowd: “No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and he’s not the same man.” Thank you, Heraclitus.

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The Internet Must Remain Anonymous

[Here’s an opposing view to a recent post, -Bob]

By Herman Gazort – Re-Blogged From iPatriot

No. We can not. In the age of political correctness, the Marxist media are thought police. In order to even say anything we need to seek alternative media that is not controlled.

Do you know who Shakespeare is? No. You don’t. William Shakespeare is a pseudonym. None of us know, for certain, who he was.

He planned his anonymity because he knew that in order for people to think for themselves they must only be guided by what they see, so that they can think for themselves and reach their own conclusions, without being influenced by someone else’s power, prestige or money. These are second hand, attributed characteristics that someone else, with a different agenda than your own well being has given the “expert.”

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Internet Gatekeepers

By Leo Goldstein – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

The main Internet gatekeepers and causes for concern are Google (GOOG), Facebook (FB), Twitter (TWTR), and Microsoft (MSFT) – together, GFTM.

Internet Gatekeepers’ Misconduct

Google locked conservative University of Toronto professor Jordan B. Peterson out of all his Google accounts. The probable cause is his dissent with the identity politics of the Left, especially his opposition to the mandatory use of “gender neutral pronouns.”

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Don’t Hide Your Gold Coins Where Your Thermostat Can See

By John Rubino- Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Back in the 1990s when businesses started going online they frequently didn’t realize that their new networking gear came with simple default passwords like “admin”. So a whole generation of early hackers simply scanned the web for companies that had inadvertently exposed themselves in this way, siphoning off (probably, no one really knows) billions of dollars and causing various other kinds of mischief.

Now that process is repeating with the Internet of things (IoT). As pretty much every device in homes and businesses is imbued with sensors and connected to internal networks and/or the broader Web, hackers are exploiting the many resulting vulnerabilities.

But this time around it’s personal, as formerly innocuous things like TVs, phones and thermostats gain cameras and microphones, creating all kinds of privacy issues – some of which are potentially (and catastrophically) financial. Here’s a sampling of what appeared on the subject in yesterday’s Wall Street Journal:

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Final Phase of the American Revolution

By Dr. Tim Ball – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Recently I spoke at the Freedom Force Conference in Phoenix on Climate Change. The person who made the connection between climate and freedom clearly and concisely was former Czech Republic President Vaclav Klaus. He was the keynote speaker at the first Heartland Climate Conference in New York. His opening comment “We have just gone through 70 years of communism, why the hell would you want to go back to that?” brought a standing ovation. He summarized his views in a brief book with the pointed title “Blue Planet in Green Shackles: What is Endangered: Climate or Freedom.”

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The Average American Today Is Richer than John D. Rockefeller

By   – Re-Blogged From The Foundation for Economic Education

This Atlantic story reveals how Americans lived 100 years ago. By the standards of a middle-class American today, that lifestyle was poor, inconvenient, dreary, and dangerous. (Only a few years later — in 1924 — the 16-year-old son of a sitting US president would die of an infected blister that the boy got on his toe while playing tennis on the White House grounds.)

So here’s a question that I’ve asked in one form or another on earlier occasions, but that is so probing that I ask it again: What is the minimum amount of money that you would demand in exchange for your going back to live even as John D. Rockefeller lived in 1916?

21.7 million 2016 dollars (which are about one million 1916 dollars)? Would that do it? What about a billion 2016 — or 1916 — dollars? Would this sizable sum of dollars be enough to enable you to purchase a quantity of high-quality 1916 goods and services that would at least make you indifferent between living in 1916 America and living (on your current income) in 2016 America?

Think about it. Hard. Carefully.

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A Tech Manifesto for the GOP Field, Part III: Government Surveillance

By – Re-Blogged From The American Enterprise Institute

Government surveillance represents one of the more challenging technological issues for the Republican field to address because it pits one set of crucial conservative values (national security and a robust homeland defense) against another (privacy, personal freedom, and restraint on the federal government’s power).

What would a principled, appealing Republican stance on surveillance look like?

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State Department Tramples 1st & 2nd Amendment Rights

By Paul Bedard – Re-Blogged From http://www.washingtonexaminer.com

NRA: Gun blogs, videos, web forums threatened by new Obama regulation.

Commonly used and unregulated internet discussions and videos about guns and ammo could be closed down under rules proposed by the State Department, amounting to a “gag order on firearm-related speech,” the National Rifle Association is warning.

In updating regulations governing international arms sales, State is demanding that anyone who puts technical details about arms and ammo on the web first get the OK from the federal government — or face a fine of up to $1 million and 20 years in jail.

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How An Anti-Piracy Law Became a Tool for Online Censorship

By Scott Shackford – Re-Blogged From http://www.Reason.com

In March, online video game critic Jim Sterling discovered that one of his YouTube videos had been yanked from the site due to claims of a copyright violation. The video in question was a review of an indie game called Skate Man Intense Rescue that included footage from the game. Sterling was apparently not a fan.

The yanking of Sterling’s video was not an accident or a mistake. The game studio, Digpex games, filed a claim using the tools provided by the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1996 (DMCA) to order YouTube to take down the video. When contacted by gaming blog Kotaku, an anonymous

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