The Dumbest Dumb Money Finally Gets Suckered In

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Corporate share repurchases have turned out to be a great mechanism for converting Federal Reserve easing into higher consumer spending. Just allow public companies to borrow really cheaply and one of the things they do with the resulting found money is repurchase their stock. This pushes up equity prices, making investors feel richer and more willing to splurge on the kinds of frivolous stuff (new cars, big houses, extravagant vacations) that produce rising GDP numbers.

For politicians and their bureaucrats this is a win-win. But for the rest of us it’s not, since the debts corporations take on to buy their own stock at market peaks tend to hobble them going forward, leading eventually to bigger share price declines than would otherwise be the case.

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Then And Now (Part 1)

By Andy Sutton & Graham Mehl – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Yesterday we had a chance to go on Liberty Talk Radio and talk about what is going on economically. We decided that despite what we felt was a great show, it didn’t even scratch the surface in terms of the differences between how things used to be and how they are now. Particularly disturbing is the relative lack of understanding or willingness to even accept the changes that have taken place by the majority of the population. The latter is called ‘normalcy bias’. It is something ingrained in each of us as a human and either reinforced or stunted by our experiences. We aren’t sure how far down the road of ‘Then and Now’ we’ll get in today’s installment. There may be future installments.

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Here’s The True Definition Of A Recession

By Frank Shostak – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

According to the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), the institution that dates the peaks and troughs of the business cycles,

A recession is a significant decline in economic activity spread across the economy, lasting more than a few months, normally visible in real GDP, real income, employment, industrial production, and wholesale-retail sales. A recession begins just after the economy reaches a peak of activity and ends as the economy reaches its trough.

In the view of the NBER dating committee, because a recession influences the economy broadly and is not confined to one sector, it makes sense to pay attention to a single best measure of aggregate economic activity, which is real GDP. The NBER dating committee views real GDP as the single best measure of aggregate economic activity.

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General Electric: Another Impending Pension Crisis is Here

By Joe Scudder – Re-Blogged From Eagle Rising

In addition to public unions facing a pension crisis, General Electric may soon be begging for a bailout.

Naturally, the news that reports on the disaster that is heading for General Electric also tries to downplay the news. The company allegedly has years to find a way to solve their pension problem. But financial news always tells the public that they have a long time before it is “time to panic.” But that is the problem: If you wait that long to panic, it is too late.

Bloomberg reports, “The $31 Billion Hole in GE’s Balance Sheet That Keeps Growing.

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New Risk for Investors: Fed Considers Jacking Up Inflation Target

By Stefan Gleason – Re-Blogged From Money Metals Exchange

Investors are under-estimating inflation risk. As a consequence, they are under-pricing inflation protecting assets including precious metals.

The Federal Reserve has given itself the objective of engineering an inflation rate of around 2%. However, there are many ways in which real-world inflation can potentially outpace the Fed’s 2% target.

Firstly, the Fed’s preferred inflation gauges are flawed. The so-called “core” rate of consumer price inflation strips out food and energy costs. The core Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE) index has also been criticized for underweighting housing and medical costs.

The PCE number for March, which came out on May 1st, shows the Fed’s favored inflation gauge running at 1.6% year over year. That’s down slightly from the previous month’s reading of 1.8% (2.1% for the headline unadjusted PCE).

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The Spread between Stock Prices and GDP is Blowing Out

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From http://www.pentoport.com

On a fundamental basis stock prices are reflective of both economic and earnings growth. When growth is strong, stock prices should increase in value. And when economic activity decelerates or turns negative, stock prices should go down. Of course nothing is that simple—especially today, when all markets are so highly manipulated by governments and central banks. Beginning in 2008 the markets followed the Fed on a magical journey down the rabbit hole into a wonderland where bad news is good news; and economic fundamentals and stock prices no longer move in tandem.

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