It’s Not Stagflation, But Inflationary Impoverishment

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

It is a matter of personal interest that it was my uncle, Iain Macleod, who invented the term stagflation shortly before he was appointed shadow chancellor in 1965. It is no longer used in its original context. From Hansard (the official record of parliamentary debates) 17 November that year:

We now have the worst of both worlds —not just inflation on the one side or stagnation on the other, but both of them together. We have a sort of “stagflation” situation and history in modern terms is indeed being made.

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2018’s ‘Short’ Of The Year

By Michael Bllanger – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

There is a famous quote about short-selling that comes from Olde English business folklore that goes something like this:

“He who sells what isn’t his’n.
Must deliver or goes to prison!”

That old horse chestnut was used to frighten the Rothchildian short-sellers that used to hang out on the old New York “curb” back before governments and influence- peddling lobbyists conspired to change the rules. I used to love to find overvalued stocks or commodities and get our trading desk to call over to the loan post to see what it would cost to borrow a few thousand shares of some pumped up bowser of a stock and then attempt to catch it on an uptick in order to sell it. The entire concept was rather civilized because everyone would know that there was a highly visible bear out there trying to get short something and invariably, the principals like the CEO or CFO would find out and then the ancient game of cat-and-mouse would begin.

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Chinese Invade Oil Realm

By Jim Willie – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

China is working a strategy with the Saudis. Since the last months of 2017, the Jackass has been firm that the ARAMCO deal for IPO stock introduction might never occur. And if it did, then Hong Kong might be the only location for the IPO launch. It seems that disclosure and transparency is non-existent to this Arab kingdom. Now the stock listing might be in Riyadh and nowhere else. Imagine the risk to brokerage houses if the truth comes out, that the Saudi oil reserves are only 20% to 40% of the disclosed amount, a grand lie and deep fraud. Such will not stop China from investing privately in ARAMCO, since it would serve two purposes. It would enable huge diverse participation in the Saudi Economy, which contains a second treasure trove of minerals. It would enable the Chinese to purchase Saudi oil in RMB terms for payment. In the last month, the Russians confirmed an equally sized investment stake in ARAMCO. If the Chinese sit on the ARAMCO board of directors, they will surely convince the Saudis to alter the payment method in approval. It could be a primary part of the deal.

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The Shape of U.S. Restrictions on Chinese FDI

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Highlights

  • In hopes of forcing China to open further, the United States is considering investment restrictions that would mirror those imposed by China.
  • China’s investment goals are to cement its position in the stable, developed U.S. economy and fuel growth in sectors key to its economic transition.
  • As such, China has two concerns: Sectors where its own restrictions will mean harsh U.S. measures and those sectors of high priority to Beijing.

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What Everyone Is Missing About The US Tax Cuts

By Steve Saville – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

The changes to US taxes that were approved late last year have drawn acclaim and criticism, but in most cases both those who view the tax changes positively and those who view the tax changes negatively are missing two important points.

Most criticism of the tax changes boils down to one of three issues. The first is that the tax cuts favour the rich. This is true, but any meaningful tax cut will have to favour the people who pay most of the tax. Furthermore, contrary to the Keynesian belief system a tax cut will bring about the greatest long-term benefit to the overall economy if it favours people who are more likely to save/invest the additional income over people who are more likely to immediately spend the additional income on consumer items.

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Is A House Really A Retirement Asset?

By Trevor Gerszt – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Many American households have their wealth tied up in their houses. For many Americans across all different income levels, the value of their houses exceeds the value of all their other financial assets. There is also a history in the United States of home ownership being recommended as a sure way of becoming wealthy, or at least financially comfortable. But in this day and age, should you really rely on a house as a retirement asset?

Jobs and Inflation: Gradually and Then Suddenly

By Ben Hunt – Re-Blogged From Wolf Street

If you’ve been reading my notes immediately before and after the June Fed meeting (“Tell My Horse” and “Post-Fed Follow-up”), you know that I think we now have a sea change in what the Fed is focused on and what their default course of action is going to be. Rather than looking for reasons to ease up on monetary policy and be more accommodative, the Fed and the ECB (and even the BOJ in their own weird way) are now looking for reasons to tighten up on monetary policy and be more restrictive. As Jamie Dimon said the other day, the tide that’s been coming in for eight years is now starting to go out. Caveat emptor.

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