Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #282

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, The Science and Environmental Policy Project

Houston Flooding – Resilience Needed: America’s great fortune of no major hurricanes (category 3 or above) making landfall ended after almost 12 years. As stated in last week’s TWTW, Hurricane Harvey made landfall on the Texas coast, between Port Aransas and Port O’Connor (east of Corpus Christi) on Friday night. It was a category 4 hurricane with wind speeds of 130-156 mph (113-136 kt; 209-251 km/h). National Weather Service had predicted a storm surge up to 9 to 13 feet (2.7 to 4 meters) and heavy rainfall of 15 to 30 inches (38 to 76 cm) with up to 40 inches (102 cm) in some locations. Later, it degraded to a tropical storm.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #282

The Week That Was: August 26, 2017 – Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

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Quote of the Week. “The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he already knows, without a shadow of a doubt, what is laid before him.” – Leo Tolstoy, 1894

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Number of the Week: 1,000,000 atomic bombs exploding per day

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History of Climate Change: In the second edition of “Climate, History, and the Modern World”, climate change research pioneer H.H. Lamb expressed disappointment with the direction the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) at the University of East Anglia was taking. Lamb had worked diligently to establish the unit to understand the causes of climate change, both warming and cooling, before any undue influence from increased

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #281

The Week That Was: August 19, 2017 Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project


Quote of the Week. Physics has a history of synthesizing many phenomena into a few theories – Richard Feynman


Number of the Week: $4 Trillion


Blackwaters: Blackwater rivers and bogs belie the claims that ocean carbonization, foolishly called “ocean acidification”, will eliminate life. Blackwater rivers are common to the Amazon and the Southeast US, and found in Europe, Africa, Australia, Indonesia, and elsewhere. A blackwater river is a slow-moving current running through forested or highly vegetated swamps or wetlands. Decaying vegetation, particularly leaves, release tannins into the water, making a comparatively transparent, acidic water into one darkly stained, resembling tea or black coffee.

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Paul Krugman Shows Why the Climate Campaign Failed

By Larry Kummer – From the Fabius Maximus website

Summary: Like all of Krugman’s work, we can learn much from his latest column about climate change. See this annotated version to see how he shows why 30 years of climate crusading has produced so little policy action in the US.

Burning World in Gloved Hand

The Axis of Climate Evil“ – “Bad faith may destroy civilization”

Paul Krugman’s op-ed in the New York Times, 11 August 2017.

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Report Showed Climate Data Was Unfit For Purpose

By Dr. Tim Ball – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

IPCC Knew from Start Climate Data Inadequate

[This station, on top of pavement, fails the NWS standard for minimal accuracy & precision. Only around 8% of all official stations in the US meet these standards, meaning that the data is not fit for the purpose used in measuring climate. See http://www.SurfaceStations.org. -Bob]

Climate Monitoring Weather Station at the University of Arizona, Tucson, measuring temperature in the University parking lot if front of the Atmospheric Science Building. The station has since been closed. 2007 Photo by Warren Meyer

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Here’s How to Avoid Climate Panics

By Dennis Avery – Re-Blogged From TownHall

Americans have suffered needless climate-related panic for the past 40 years—not realizing that, since 1850, our newspapers have given us a climate scare about every 25 years. And none of them was valid.

Fortunately, climate science is now good enough to predict the key abrupt climate cycles that Mother Nature visits upon earth through the millennia. After the cold of the Maunder Sunspot Minimum at 1715, for example, earth’s temperature warmed 0.3 degrees in less than 25 years. Then two centuries later, the temperatures dropped equally swiftly into the cold of the Dalton Minimum. These abrupt shifts occurred over decades rather than centuries. Some shifts have been favorable, an equal number were unfavorable – and none involved carbon dioxide.

Here's How to Avoid Climate Panics

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Weather-Related Natural Disasters: Should We Be Concerned About a Reversion to the Mean?

By Roger Pielke Jr – Re-Blogged From Risk Frontiers

The world is presently in an era of unusually low weather disasters. This holds for the weather phenomena that have historically caused the most damage: tropical cyclones, floods, tornadoes and drought. Given how weather events have become politicized in debates over climate change, some find this hard to believe. Fortunately, government and IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) analyses allow such claims to be adjudicated based on science, and not politics.  Here I briefly summarize recent relevant data.

Every six months Munich Re publishes a tally of the costs of disasters around the world for the past half year. This is an excellent resource for tracking disaster costs over time.  The data allows us to compare disaster costs to global GDP, to get a sense of the magnitude of these costs in the context of economic activity.  Using data from the UN, here is how that data looks since 1990, when we have determined that data is most reliable and complete.

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