Wholesale Prices Rise Most in 6 Years as Gasoline, Food Jump

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

U.S. wholesale prices rose by the most in six years last month, led higher by more expensive gas, food, and chemicals.

The Labor Department said Friday that the producer price index — which measures price increases before they reach the consumer — leapt 0.6 percent in October, after a smaller 0.2 percent rise in September. Producer prices increased 2.9 percent from a year earlier.

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Wages, Salaries Rise by Most in Decade as US Adds 227,000 Jobs

By Thomson Reuters – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

U.S. wages and salaries rose by the most in a decade while private sector payrolls increased by the most in eight months in October, suggesting overall job growth accelerated this month after Hurricane Florence weighed on restaurant and retail employment in September.

The Labor Department’s Employment Cost Index showed wages and salaries, which account for 70 percent of employment costs, jumped 0.9 percent in the third quarter after climbing 0.5 percent in the prior period.

The “Strong Dollar” Buys Less

By Clint Siegner – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Some of last week’s weakness in the stock market was attributed to surprisingly week jobs report on Friday. Non-farm payrolls came in significantly below projections.

However, much of that weakness was explained by Hurricane Florence. And the headline unemployment rate dropped to 3.7% – the lowest in almost 50 years.

Much was made of that, while almost nothing was made of the rate of employment at 60.4% – also near 50-year lows.

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Items Hit Hardest By Tariffs

By Mac Slavo – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

The Trump administration’s insistence on a trade war will affect three items the most. Americans will be footing the bill for president Donald Trump’s trade war and tariffs, and vacuums, tires, and computer parts will be the items hit the hardest.

By now, hopefully, Americans have put two and two together and figured out that it isn’t the Chinese government that will pay for Trump’s tariffs, but the Chinese consumer. Much like the American government will not pay for China’s tariffs, it will be the American consumer. Those costs are passed on directly to the public in the form of higher cost of goods. And if you’re looking for a new vacuum or tires, or maybe you’d like to upgrade your computer, expect much higher prices immediately.

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Jobless Claims Fall to Near 49-Year Low

By Thomson Reuters – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

The number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment aid fell to near a 49-year low last week and private payrolls rose steadily in August, pointing to sustained labor market strength that should continue to underpin economic growth.

The economy so far appears to be weathering an escalating trade war between the United States and China as well as tensions with other trade partners, including Canada, the European Union and Mexico, which have rattled financial markets.

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Blue-Collar Lives Seem to Be Advancing in the ‘Right Direction’

By Madison Summers – Re-Blogged From IJR

New study collected from 1,049 blue-collar workers shows they’re pretty optimistic about their lives and jobs.

In a new survey by The Harris Poll, commissioned by Express Employment Professionals, 85 percent of blue-collar workers believe their lives are heading “in the right direction.”

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