Jobless Claims Fall to Near 49-Year Low

By Thomson Reuters – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

The number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment aid fell to near a 49-year low last week and private payrolls rose steadily in August, pointing to sustained labor market strength that should continue to underpin economic growth.

The economy so far appears to be weathering an escalating trade war between the United States and China as well as tensions with other trade partners, including Canada, the European Union and Mexico, which have rattled financial markets.

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Blue-Collar Lives Seem to Be Advancing in the ‘Right Direction’

By Madison Summers – Re-Blogged From IJR

New study collected from 1,049 blue-collar workers shows they’re pretty optimistic about their lives and jobs.

In a new survey by The Harris Poll, commissioned by Express Employment Professionals, 85 percent of blue-collar workers believe their lives are heading “in the right direction.”

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Why Aren’t Widespread Labor Shortages Translating Into Roaring Wage Inflation?

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Google “labor shortage” or “wage hikes” and the result is a picture of an overheating economy. Some examples from August 10:

Why Disneyland’s $15-an-hour labor deal is a win for workers everywhere

Colorado small businesses seek help with labor shortage

Washington growers struggle with labor shortage

Now hiring: teenagers (and anyone else willing to work)

You can’t read these headlines and not expect wages to climb dramatically as desperate companies pay what they have to in order to keep their customers happy. But the macro numbers tell a different story. Here’s the change in average hourly earnings over the past decade:

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Rising Wages = Shrinking Corporate Profit Margins … And Falling Stock Prices?

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Today’s Wall Street Journal contains a couple of charts that illustrate a relationship that’s not getting much media attention these days: The fact that tightening labor markets are forcing companies to raise wages, in the process squeezing their own profit margins.

Historically this margin compression has been either a cause of or contributor to cyclical turning points — in other words it coincides with recessions and equity bear markets.

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Inflation Is Back, Part 9: Two Sentences Say It All

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Okay, one more look at wage inflation, followed by a short diatribe on the unfairness of life.

As the labor markets get tighter, power is finally shifting from companies to workers. For some reason Iowa is leading the way (the promised two sentences are in bold):

Say Hello to Full Employment — Want to know where the economy is headed? Look at Des Moines

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Inflation Is Back, Part 8: Labor Shortage Reaches “Critical” Point

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Economist Peter Bookvar recently analyzed the the anecdotal evidence of capacity constraints piling up in recent industry surveys, including the following:

“Business is strong in all regions. Materials are tight. Trucking continues to be a major challenge.” (Chemical Products)

“Strong economic growth continues to put pressure/strain on capacity, lead time, availability and pricing across a broadening array of commodities and components.” (Computer & Electronic Products)

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US Adds 213,000 Jobs as Unemployment Hits 4 Percent, Wages Rise

By Thomson Reuters – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

U.S. job growth increased more than expected in June as manufacturers stepped up hiring, but steady wage gains pointed to moderate inflation pressures that should keep the Federal Reserve on a path of gradual interest rate increases.

Nonfarm payrolls rose by 213,000 jobs last month, the Labor Department said on Friday. Data for April and May was revised to show 37,000 more jobs created than previously reported. The economy needs to create roughly 120,000 jobs per month to keep up with growth in the working-age population.

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