How to Make Your Business Credit Score Amazing

Re-Blogged From Bizzmarkblog

Image by Ahmad Ardity from Pixabay

Many small business owners don’t seem to understand that their business and personal credit score affect their company. And the credit industry has become a 100-year-old business brimming with hidden factors and influences. Business credit scores are still separate from a personal credit score. However, all three major credit bureaus manage every single personal credit. They include Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion.

There is significant consumer protection in place for securing access to your information without your permission. Moreover, specific laws require credit bureaus to ensure the information is reported accurately. But none of it applies in the business credit world. Not to mention that all business credit is managed by three major credit bureaus – Equifax, Experian, and Dun & Bradstreet.

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Total Debt And Leveraged Loans To The Rescue

By Arkadiusz Sieroń – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The Fed has just published the newest edition of its Financial Stability Report. It covers what the most powerful central bank in the world perceives as risks to the financial system stability. Is it time for the gold bulls to uncork champagne?

Financial Sectors Appears Resilient, But…

The Fed’s assessment of the financial vulnerabilities in the latest Financial Stability Report has little changed since November 2018 when the report was inaugurated. The financial sector appears resilient, with low leverage and limited funding risk. It seems that gold will have to wait longer for a crisis that could push its prices out of the comfort zone.

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From Startup to Exit: How Non-conventional Funding Can Help at Every Stage of Business

By Shiv Nanda – Re-Blogged From Indian CEO

Every entrepreneur steps into business with a clear vision in mind. This vision is often fed and manipulated by managing and prioritizing the use of available financial resources.

The three main sources of funding for business are:

  • Revenues from business operations,
  • Investor finances such as owner’s, partner’s, or Angel/venture capital, and
  • Loan from individuals, business loan or personal loan for businessmen from banks and financial institutions.

Each company has to go through various stages. That’s the business lifecycle. And each of these stages is unique. Therefore, each stage needs a different funding strategy.

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The World Bank and its Defunct Energy Policy

By Tilak Doshi, – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The shock resignation of World Bank President Dr Jim Yong Kim, announced in early January, more than three years before his term would have ended, and the nomination of David Malpass, one of the institution’s sharpest critics in the current US administration, has been seen as yet another disruptive change to the global order under President Trump’s watch.

While disruptive change has become a regular affair under this most impetuous of US presidents, the changing of the guard at the World Bank is potentially of great consequence to the world’s poor. That is, assuming the Malpass nomination is not seriously challenged by the EU which jealously guards its say in the appointment of IMF Managing Director as part of the quid pro quo over the twin Bretton Woods institutions that served the post-World War order.

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This Is New: Governments Ramp Up Borrowing IN ANTICIPATION Of A Slowdown

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

The business cycle has its stages, and they’re usually both predictable and logical. For example, governments tend to generate a lot of tax revenue late in an expansion as more people get jobs and start paying income taxes and rising stock prices generate big capital gains. Meanwhile, less has to be spent on social safety net programs because everyone is working. Combine higher tax revenues and lower spending and you get shrinking deficits.

But not this time. Government borrowing soared around the world in 2018, even as economic growth, employment and stock prices peaked. Why the change? Well, apparently governments have decided – for the first time since the inception of the business cycle – to preemptively attack the next recession.

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Liquidity, Money Supply And Insolvency

By Andy Sutton – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

Liquidity is becoming of central importance once again. It is frequently mentioned in mainstream media articles, interviews, and ‘educational’ programs.  It was a central point of discussion during the financial market blowout in 2008.

The killing off of a little-known (until it was dead!) data series earlier this year by the not-so-USFed has gotten the beehive buzzing once again about a liquidity crisis – or the possible aversion of one in the short term. It has also gotten things buzzing about the longer term as well.

What Happened

Late in 2017, the St. Louis Fed stopped publishing interbank loan data. Period. Just prior to that, the amount of interbank loans on a weekly basis dropped to zero:

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America’s Student Loan Debt Bubble

By Michael Snyder – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

Higher education has become one of the biggest money-making scams in America.  We tell all of our young people that if they want to have a bright future, they must go to college.  This message is relentlessly pounded into their heads for their first 18 years, and so by the time high school graduation rolls around for many of them, it would be unthinkable to do anything else.  And instead of doing a cost/benefit analysis on various schools, we tell our young people to go to the best college that they can possibly get into and to not worry about what it will cost.  We assure them that a great job will be there after they graduate and that great job will allow them to easily pay off any student loans that they have accumulated.  Of course, most college graduates don’t end up getting great jobs, but many of them do end up being financially crippled for decades by student loan debt.

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