How to Make Your Business Credit Score Amazing

Re-Blogged From Bizzmarkblog

Image by Ahmad Ardity from Pixabay

Many small business owners don’t seem to understand that their business and personal credit score affect their company. And the credit industry has become a 100-year-old business brimming with hidden factors and influences. Business credit scores are still separate from a personal credit score. However, all three major credit bureaus manage every single personal credit. They include Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion.

There is significant consumer protection in place for securing access to your information without your permission. Moreover, specific laws require credit bureaus to ensure the information is reported accurately. But none of it applies in the business credit world. Not to mention that all business credit is managed by three major credit bureaus – Equifax, Experian, and Dun & Bradstreet.

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Total Debt And Leveraged Loans To The Rescue

By Arkadiusz Sieroń – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The Fed has just published the newest edition of its Financial Stability Report. It covers what the most powerful central bank in the world perceives as risks to the financial system stability. Is it time for the gold bulls to uncork champagne?

Financial Sectors Appears Resilient, But…

The Fed’s assessment of the financial vulnerabilities in the latest Financial Stability Report has little changed since November 2018 when the report was inaugurated. The financial sector appears resilient, with low leverage and limited funding risk. It seems that gold will have to wait longer for a crisis that could push its prices out of the comfort zone.

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From Startup to Exit: How Non-conventional Funding Can Help at Every Stage of Business

By Shiv Nanda – Re-Blogged From Indian CEO

Every entrepreneur steps into business with a clear vision in mind. This vision is often fed and manipulated by managing and prioritizing the use of available financial resources.

The three main sources of funding for business are:

  • Revenues from business operations,
  • Investor finances such as owner’s, partner’s, or Angel/venture capital, and
  • Loan from individuals, business loan or personal loan for businessmen from banks and financial institutions.

Each company has to go through various stages. That’s the business lifecycle. And each of these stages is unique. Therefore, each stage needs a different funding strategy.

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The World Bank and its Defunct Energy Policy

By Tilak Doshi, – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The shock resignation of World Bank President Dr Jim Yong Kim, announced in early January, more than three years before his term would have ended, and the nomination of David Malpass, one of the institution’s sharpest critics in the current US administration, has been seen as yet another disruptive change to the global order under President Trump’s watch.

While disruptive change has become a regular affair under this most impetuous of US presidents, the changing of the guard at the World Bank is potentially of great consequence to the world’s poor. That is, assuming the Malpass nomination is not seriously challenged by the EU which jealously guards its say in the appointment of IMF Managing Director as part of the quid pro quo over the twin Bretton Woods institutions that served the post-World War order.

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This Is New: Governments Ramp Up Borrowing IN ANTICIPATION Of A Slowdown

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

The business cycle has its stages, and they’re usually both predictable and logical. For example, governments tend to generate a lot of tax revenue late in an expansion as more people get jobs and start paying income taxes and rising stock prices generate big capital gains. Meanwhile, less has to be spent on social safety net programs because everyone is working. Combine higher tax revenues and lower spending and you get shrinking deficits.

But not this time. Government borrowing soared around the world in 2018, even as economic growth, employment and stock prices peaked. Why the change? Well, apparently governments have decided – for the first time since the inception of the business cycle – to preemptively attack the next recession.

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Liquidity, Money Supply And Insolvency

By Andy Sutton – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

Liquidity is becoming of central importance once again. It is frequently mentioned in mainstream media articles, interviews, and ‘educational’ programs.  It was a central point of discussion during the financial market blowout in 2008.

The killing off of a little-known (until it was dead!) data series earlier this year by the not-so-USFed has gotten the beehive buzzing once again about a liquidity crisis – or the possible aversion of one in the short term. It has also gotten things buzzing about the longer term as well.

What Happened

Late in 2017, the St. Louis Fed stopped publishing interbank loan data. Period. Just prior to that, the amount of interbank loans on a weekly basis dropped to zero:

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America’s Student Loan Debt Bubble

By Michael Snyder – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

Higher education has become one of the biggest money-making scams in America.  We tell all of our young people that if they want to have a bright future, they must go to college.  This message is relentlessly pounded into their heads for their first 18 years, and so by the time high school graduation rolls around for many of them, it would be unthinkable to do anything else.  And instead of doing a cost/benefit analysis on various schools, we tell our young people to go to the best college that they can possibly get into and to not worry about what it will cost.  We assure them that a great job will be there after they graduate and that great job will allow them to easily pay off any student loans that they have accumulated.  Of course, most college graduates don’t end up getting great jobs, but many of them do end up being financially crippled for decades by student loan debt.

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But “We Owe It To Ourselves”

By Keith Weiner – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Have you ever heard someone say this? It falls into the category of, it’s so perverse, so wrong, and so wrong-headed that there has got to be a constituency out there somewhere, to assert this!

First, let’s head off at the pass the objection that the majority of US government debt is held by foreigners. As of March this year, the US Treasury estimates that $6.3 trillion worth of Treasury bills and bonds are owned by foreign holders. This is not even close to the majority of it.

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Death Of The Great Recovery (Part 2): The Second Coming Of Carmageddon

By David Haggith – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Like the disintegration of the formerly charmed stock market, the return of Carmageddon is right on schedule. I had stated early last year that one of the first cracks in our economy to become evident would be the crash of the car industry.

That crack materialized as promised, but then Hurricanes Harvey and Irma showed up to flood a million automobiles. Before any statistics materialized to show the economic impacts of those storms, I wrote the following revision for the dates of Carmageddon:

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Bad Bankers Drive Out Good Bankers: Wells Fargo, Wall Street, And Gresham’s Law

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Back in the 1500s, a financial agent of Queen Elizabeth I named Thomas Gresham observed that that “bad money drives out good.” That is, if two kinds of money are circulating at the same legal value, people will spend the lower-quality money and save the higher. The latter as a result ceases to circulate. This became known as Gresham’s law.

More recently, in our book The Money Bubble, James Turk and I extended this concept to bankers, observing that in times of very easy money, bad bankers drive out good:

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Smaller Subprime Auto Lenders Are Folding as Losses Pile Up

By Bloomberg – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Growing numbers of small subprime auto lenders are closing or shutting down after loan losses and slim margins spur banks and private equity owners to cut off funding.

Summit Financial Corp., a Plantation, Florida-based subprime car finance company, filed for bankruptcy late last month after lenders including Bank of America Corp. said it had misreported losses from soured loans. And a creditor to Spring Tree Lending, an Atlanta-based subprime auto lender, filed to force the company into bankruptcy last week, after a separate group of investors accused the company of fraud. Private equity-backed Pelican Auto Finance, which specialized in “deep subprime” borrowers, finished winding down last month after seeing its profit margins shrink.

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British Suddenly Stop Buying Cars

By Mark O’Byrne -Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

British people suddenly stopped buying cars

– Massive debt including car loans, very low household savings – Brexit and decline in sterling and consumer confidence impacts – New cars being bought on PCP by people who could not normally afford them – UK car business has ‘exactly the same problems’ as the mortgage market 10 years ago, according to Morgan Stanley – Bank of England is investigating to make sure UK banks are not overly exposed… – Prudent British people buying gold with cash, not cars with debt

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Did The Sub-Prime 2.0 Bubble Just Burst?

By Graham Summers – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

We’ve been tracking the sub-prime auto-loan industry closely.

Our view is that this industry represents the worst of the worst excesses of our current credit bubble, much as the subprime mortgage industry represented the worst of the worst in excess for the Housing Bubble.

For this reason, we refer to sub-prime auto-loans as Subprime 2.0.

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How Can The Fed Possibly Unwind QE?

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

There are currently two important items on the Fed’s wish list. The first is to restore interest rates to more normal levels, and the second is to unwind the Fed’s balance sheet, which has expanded since the great financial crisis, principally through quantitative easing (QE). Is this not just common sense?

Maybe. It is one thing to wish, another to achieve. The Fed has demonstrated only one skill, and that is to ensure the quantity of money continually expands, yet they are now saying they will attempt to achieve the opposite, at least with base money, while increasing interest rates.

Both these aims appear reasonable if they can be accomplished, but the game is given away by the objective. It is the desire to return the Fed’s interest rate policies and balance sheet towards where they were before the last financial crisis, because the Fed wants to be prepared for the next one. Essentially, the Fed is admitting that its monetary policies are not guaranteed to work, and despite all the PhDs employed in the federal system, central bank policy remains stuck in a blind alley. Fed does not want to institute a normalised balance sheet just for the sake of it.

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“Bigger Systemic Risk” Now Than 2008 – Bank of England

By Mark O’Byrne – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

– Bank of England warn that “bigger systemic risk” now than in 2008
– BOE, Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) concerns re financial system
– Banks accused of “balance sheet trickery” -undermining spirit of post-08 rules
– EU & UK corporate bond markets may be bigger source of instability than ’08
– Credit card debt and car loan surge could cause another financial crisis

– PRA warn banks returning to similar practices to those that sparked 08 crisis
– ‘Conscious that corporate memories can be shed surprisingly fast’ warns PRA Chair

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Safety In Banking

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

There was a time when banks acted as custodians of their customers’ money. Indeed, keeping a person’s money and using it as if it belonged to you without their agreement is fraud in common law. A banking license legally exempts banks from charges of criminality in pursuing the normal course of fractional reserve banking business, by making it clear that you, the customer, agree to being a creditor of the bank instead of the bank acting as custodian for your money.

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Loans vs Lines of Credit

Guest Post By Rebecca Kennedy

Is a Loan or Line of Credit Better for Business Financing?

When you are searching for the best-fit financing to grow or sustain operations in a business, the number of options can seem overwhelming. There are lenders who offer complex products based on the assets held by the business, crowdfunding platforms that engage everyday investors, and conventional banks that provide a variety of borrowing vehicles based on how the funding will be used over time. While the options are daunting, it helps to understand the differences between the two most common categories of business lending – a business loan and a line of credit.

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The Case Of The Missing US Stocks

By Frank Holmes – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

In the last 20 years, the U.S. stock market has undergone an alarming change that too few people are aware of or talking about. Between 1996 and 2016, the number of listed companies fell by half, from 7,300 to 3,600, according to a recent report by Credit Suisse. This occurred despite the U.S. economy growing nearly 60 percent over the same period.

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In Praise of Usury

Re-Blogged From The Economist (from 2007)

In DANTE’S “Divine Comedy”, usurers are consigned to a flaming desert of sand within the seventh circle of hell. Attitudes have since softened a bit. Microcreditors, who offer small loans to self-employed poor people, enjoy hallowed reputations. One has even ascended to the rank of a Nobel laureate. But lending to the poor is still considered distasteful whenever it is pricey, short-term and profitable. In America, for example, many activists are quick to damn “payday” lenders, who may charge high fees for offering cash advances on a worker’s next pay cheque.

Why this hostility? To profit from lending to the poor, critics say, is to prey on the most vulnerable, at their most vulnerable moment. Faced with desperate customers, loan sharks can charge well over the odds, even when the risk of default is slight. The money they proffer is often squandered on spurious consumption, critics say, rather than productive investments that would help the borrower repay his debts. Easy credit thus tempts people into a damaging spiral of indebtedness.

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Oil Town Americans Late on Car Loan Payments

By Matt Egan – Re-Blogged From CNN Money

Stress in the oil industry is starting to contaminate other parts of the American economy.

For the first time since oil prices began crashing in mid-2014, banks polled by the Federal Reserve are warning of a “spillover” effect onto loans made to businesses and households in energy-dependent regions of the country.

Senior loan officers of nearly 100 banks acknowledged that credit quality has “deteriorated” on everything from auto loans and credit cards to commercial real estate mortgages. Translation: More people aren’t paying and delinquencies are rising.

It’s a sign of how the deep spending cuts, mass layoffs and even bankruptcy filings in the oil patch are inflicting real pain in certain energy-focused states like Texas and North Dakota.

Some large U.S. banks have individually warned of early signs of so-called contagion.

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