The ‘Climate Emergency’ -Running With the Crowds?

By Tony Brown – Re-Blogged From WUWT

This article about the ‘Climate emergency’ was written several weeks ago, before the Corona virus (Covid 19) really hit the headlines. Just today, President Trump banned travel from the European mainland to the U.S., the Australian Grand Prix was cancelled, Tom Hanks and his wife are in quarantine in that country and the virus has just been labelled a pandemic. Stock markets have plunged. All perhaps illustrating that we never quite know what is just around the corner, and how one panic can quickly supplant another.

The article originally written with the concerns over the ‘Climate Emergency’ in mind, has therefore taken on a different dimension, as for the first time we have some of those sceptical over the science of the ‘Climate Emergency’ accepting the science behind the consequences of the Covid 19 outbreak. Consequently, perhaps those alarmed about Covid 19 but not the climate, can, for the first time, understand the depths of concern and alarm of those who feel that a Climate Armageddon is upon us.

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COP21 and the Madness of Crowds

By Charles G. Battig – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

mackay-madness-of-crowdsIt is unfortunate that Charles Mackay is no longer alive to add yet another chapter or two to his insightful book of human follies, Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds.  First published in 1841, his book chronicles in sixteen examples of crowd psychology with some of the notable economic and social foibles of the past.  The preface includes his observation that “[w]e find that whole communities suddenly fix their minds on one object, and go mad in its pursuit: that millions of people become simultaneously impressed with one delusion and run after it, til their attention is caught by some new folly more captivating than the first.”

Chapter headings include The Mississippi Scheme, The South-Sea Bubble, The Tulipomania, Fortune-Telling, The Magnetisers, The Crusades, and The Witch Mania.  These and the other chapters were chosen by Mackay to illustrate recurring but  transient moral and economic epidemics, and to “show how easily the masses have been led astray, and how imitative and gregarious men are, even in their infatuations and crimes.”  The foreword by Bernard Baruch in the 1932 edition references Schiller’s dictum: “Anyone taken as an individual is tolerably sensible and reasonable – as a member of a crowd he at once becomes a blockhead.”

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