Get Ready for Some SERIOUS Sticker Shock as Inflation Heats Up

By Mike Gleason – Re-Blogged From Money Metals

Gold and silver markets are inching closer to achieving major upside breakouts.

On Thursday, gold rallied above a near-term consolidation pattern to close at $1,747 an ounce. That put the monetary metal about $30 away from making new highs for the year. As of this Friday recording, gold prices are marching higher again and come in at $1,761, up 2.5% for the week.

Turning to silver, the white metal gained nearly 3% yesterday to touch a major resistance line just above the $16 per ounce level and the momentum is carrying over into today. A strong weekly close above yesterday’s high could trigger a wave of technical buying that propels prices much higher in the days ahead – and it looks as though such a close is in fact going to happen.

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Production Shutdown Leads to Meat Shortages

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The Meat Wars

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Rita Rubin, Senior Writer, JAMA Medical News & Perspectives,  has stirred the pot on the controversy surrounding a series of studies published last Fall in the Annals of Internal Medicine, “one of the most widely cited and influential specialty medical journals in the world.”  Her  latest piece,  titled “Backlash Over Meat Dietary Recommendations Raises Questions About Corporate Ties to Nutrition Scientists”,  appeared in JAMA online  on 15 January 2020.   It begins with this:

“It’s almost unheard of for medical journals to get blowback for studies before the data are published. But that’s what happened to the Annals of Internal Medicine last fall as editors were about to post several studies showing that the evidence linking red meat consumption with cardiovascular disease and cancer is too weak to recommend that adults eat less of it.

 

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Modern Scientific Controversies Part 7: The Meat War

By Kip Hansen  —  Re-Blogged From WUWT

Prologue:  This is part of  an occasional  series of essays that discusses ongoing scientific controversies, a specific type of which are often referred to in the science press and elsewhere as “Wars” – for instance, one essay covered the “Salt Wars1 and another the “Obesity War” — and one which appears most commonly here at this web site: “The Climate Wars”.    The purpose of the series is to illuminate the similarities and differences involved in these ongoing controversies, as part of the social culture of science in our modern world.

This essay specifically covers the furor over a six-paper body of work that appeared recently in The Annals of Internal Medicine reviewing the evidence used to make public health recommendations for amounts of red and processed meat in the human diet.

In The Meat War, the headlines scream out:

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Meatless Diet?

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From WUWT

From the NY Times’ seemingly unlimited stockpile of odd activist efforts on behalf of “The Climate” — we have a new entry that landed in my email box today [it could land in yours too if you subscribe to the newsletter, Climate Fwd:] —

What if We All Ate a Bit Less Meat?

By Jillian Mock

Jillian Mock writes a glowing report of how much land would be freed up and how many tons of reduced CO2 emissions would result if everyone just ate a bit less meat. She references a study from Scientific Reports section of Nature titled, in the modern way,  “Environmentally Optimal, Nutritionally Sound, Protein and Energy Conserving Plant Based Alternatives to U.S. Meat”.

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Now They’re coming after the Roast Beef of Old England

By Christopher Monckton of Brenchley – Re-Blogged From WUWT

At Harvard, there was once a University. Now that once noble campus has become a luxury asylum for the terminally feeble-minded. Walter Willett, one of the inmates (in his sadly incurable delusion he calls himself “Professor of Nutrition”), has gibbered to a well-meaning visitor from Business Insider that “eating a diet that’s especially high in red meat will be undermining the sustainability of the climate.”

Farewell, then, to the Roast Beef of Old England. So keen are we in the Old Country on our Sunday roast (cooked rare and sliced thickish) that the French call us les rosbifs. But the “Professor” (for we must humor him by letting him think he is qualified to talk about nutrition) wants to put a stop to all that.

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Major Climate Change Review of British Food Production

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The UK government wants academics, industry and the public to provide evidence to a major inquiry into British food, whose mandate appears to have a strong emphasis on considering the climate impacts of current means of food production.

Press release
Public to have their say on the food system of the future

British shoppers will be able to buy environmentally friendly, healthy and affordable food under plans for a radical shake-up of the UK’s food industry.

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