Is Canada’s Health Care System Better Than Ours in the US?

By Carlin Becker – Re-Blogged From IJR

Health care is always on Americans’ minds, and the politics around keeping people insured and healthy, cutting costs and providing high-quality care remains a critical issue.

While some have argued for deregulating the health care industry, insisting less red tape and more competition would yield better results, others on the political spectrum have pushed for a government-run system reminiscent of our neighbors to the north — but is Canada’s health care system really better than ours?

Continue reading

States Rush to Rein In Prescription Costs, and Drug Companies Fight Back

By Robert Pear – Re-Blogged From NY Times

States around the country are clamping down on pharmaceutical companies, forcing them to disclose and justify price increases, but the drug manufacturers are fighting back, challenging the state laws as a violation of their constitutional rights.

Even more states are, for the first time, trying to regulate middlemen who play a crucial role by managing drug benefits for employers and insurers, while taking payments from drug companies in return for giving preferential treatment to their drugs.

Image
Twenty-four states have passed 37 bills this year to curb rising prescription drug costs, according to Trish Riley, the executive director of the National Academy for State Health Policy.CreditJulio

Continue reading

Federal Grants to States

By Veronique de Rugy – Re-Blogged From Mercator Center George Mason University

The federal government spends over $500 billion annually on grants-in-aid to state and local governments, making grants-in-aid the third largest item in the budget after Social Security and national defense. In recent decades, federal aid to state and local governments has soared and, thus, increased their reliance on federal aid for the financing of certain government functions.
.
Using data from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the following two charts place the post-1960s explosion in federal grants to state and local governments in perspective. Grants-in-aid are a primary mechanism that the federal government uses to extend its influence into state
and local affairs. Under the grant-in-aid process, the federal government claims to extend aid to the states to finance “areas of domestic public spending” or for “swift fiscal relief during the recent recession” or for when “severe and unforeseen economic conditions” arise.

Continue reading

Senate Pushing Obamacare Bailout

By Bill Hoffmann – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., told Newsmax TV on Thursday he remains dead set against the newly tweaked Senate healthcare bill and warned Republicans they will be clobbered with blame when their watered down version of the failing Affordable Care Act similarly begins to collapse.

“I don’t think some miracle happens with this Republican plan,” Paul, a Kentucky Republican, said on “Newsmax Now” with Bill Tucker. “The main thing that happens is now the . . . dysfunctional part of the marketplace is going to be blamed on Republicans.

Important: Newsmax TV is available on DirecTV Ch. 349, U-verse 1220, and FiOS 615. If your cable operator does not have Newsmax TV just call and ask them to put us on — Call toll-free 1-844-500-6397 and we will connect you right away to your cable operator! Continue reading

Tea Party Drinking Too Much Decaf

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

On December 16th, 1773 the Sons of Liberty in Boston, in protest of the Tea Act, destroyed an entire shipment of tea sent by the East India Company, in a political protest referred to as the Boston Tea Party.

Following the Wall Street bail-outs in 2009, a political movement also protesting their lack of representation in government sought a reduction of the U.S. national debt and deficits by reducing government spending and lowering taxes. They were referred to as The Tea Party, named from the aforementioned Boston variety.

Since then, supporters of the Tea Party have had a major impact on the internal politics of Republicans and have helped secure both houses of congress. But these representatives who were elected to bring fiscal discipline to Washington have failed to deliver on their promises.

A year before The Great Recession the Federal deficit was $162 billion, it peaked in 2009 at $1.45 trillion and this year came in at $439 billion, and is projected to increase significantly after 2018. All this overspend has driven our national debt to over $18 trillion dollars, which is already north of 100% of the Gross Domestic Product.

Continue reading

Immigrants and Welfare

By Cathy Burke – Re-Blogged From http://www.NewsMax.com

Half of immigrant households, both legal and illegal, received some kind of public assistance in 2012, compared with 30 percent of non-immigrant families enrolled in welfare programs, a new report shows.

According to the Center for Immigration Studies’ 52-page study, which examined the Census Bureaus’ Survey of Income and Program Participation data, welfare use rates are “a good deal higher than use rates shown by other Census data.”

Continue reading

Fewer Workers, More Beneficiaries, Less Prosperity

By Bill Bonner – Re-Blogged from http://www.davidstockmanscontracorner.com

In politics and economics, most people believe what isn’t true: that the common folk select their leaders … and that these leaders are wiser than God.

We recall an early experiment. The pilgrims washed up in the wrong place … and then proceeded to almost exterminate themselves with clumsy central planning. Their system discouraged work and encouraged zombies. Wrote Plymouth County governor William Bradford:

 [The system of] taking away of property and bringing [it] into a commonwealth [caused] confusion and discontent [and] retarded much employment that would have been to benefit and comfort [of the settlers].

Continue reading

Minimum Wage Madness

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

During the 1st third of the 20th century, the Minimum Wage was held to be Unconstitutional, since it violated the Due Process guarantee under the 14th Amendment. In 1937, during the Roosevelt Administration, the Supreme Court overturned their earlier, long-standing ruling, and the Minimum Wage was declared to be Constitutional.

An important consideration is that, in February 1937, FDR had legislation introduced which would “pack” the Supreme Court – potentially increasing the voting number to 15 Justices. FDR supported the Minimum Wage, and his attacks on the then current makeup of the high court likely influenced members’ votes.

Continue reading

When Does Helping Actually Hurt

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

The US Cost of Living has gone up relentlessly since Eisenhower was President – sometimes faster and sometimes slower. Every Administration, whether Republican or Democrat, has seen a higher CPI reading than his predecessor.

Some categories have gone up faster than others, year after year. Much of the reason for these categories not only rising year after year, but rising more quickly than other categories, is that this is where government money has flowed.

Let’s look at a few examples. The cost of a college tuition and the cost

Continue reading

American Generosity vs Entitlements

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

Many people doubt the generosity of Americans, especially Americans. They don’t want to depend on the generosity of strangers to provide food for the hungry, shelter for the homeless, medical care for the medically indigent, or education for the poor. For them, if we don’t force all those American versions of Scrooge to cough up tax dollars, those in need won’t be provided for.

Continue reading