Global Energy Balances … Except When It Doesn’t

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From WUWT

I came across an interesting 2014 paper called The energy balance over land and oceans: an assessment based on direct observations and CMIP5 climate models. In it, they make a number of comparisons between observational data and 43 climate models regarding the large-scale energy flows of the planet. Here’s a typical graphic:

Figure 1. ORIGINAL CAPTION: “Fig. 7 Average biases (model—observations) in downward solar radiation at Earth’s surface calculated in 43 CMIP5 models at 760 sites from GEBA. Units Wm−2”. The “CMIP5” is the “Computer Model Intercomparison Project 5”, the fifth iteration of a project which compares the various models and how well they perform.

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Environmental Groups Claim Coal Killed 7,600 People in Europe in 2016… Can’t Name Any of the Victims

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

[Sue the Bastards! -Bob]

Groups target Europe’s coal companies over harmful emissions

FILE – In this Feb. 27, 2018 file photo a coal-fired power station steams in the cold winter air in Gelsenkirchen, Germany. Environmental groups say 10 utility companies are responsible for the majority of premature deaths caused by emissions from coal-fired power plants in Europe. In a report published Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2018 five campaign groups, including Greenpeace, blame the companies for 7,600 premature deaths and millions of work days lost across Europe in 2016. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, file) (Martin Meissner)

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A Day in the Life of a Model

By Amy Bebbington – Re-Blogged From https://www.ukmodels.co.uk

One of the most desirable aspects of the model industry is the flexible nature. No day is the same moving away from the dull and mundane office hours. Attracted to the photoshoot life, aspiring models yearn for the glamour of the world of the fashion pages. But what is life really like for successful models. What does their day-to-day look like? The reality may be slightly different.

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2016 Global Surface Temperatures

By Bob Tisdale – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Figure 1 presents two model-data comparisons for global sea surface temperatures, not anomalies, for the past 30-years. I’ve included a comparison for the global oceans (90S-90N) in the top graph and a comparison for the global oceans, excluding the polar oceans (60S-60N), in the bottom graph. Excluding the polar oceans doesn’t seem to make a significant difference. It’s obvious that global sea surfaces simulated by the GISS climate model were warmer than observed and that the GISS model warming rate is too high over the past 3 decades. The difference between modeled and observed warming rates is approximately 0.07 to 0.08 deg C/decade, more than 60% higher than the observed rate. And in both cases the 30-year average sea surface temperature as simulated by the GISS models is too high by about 0.6 deg C.

figure-1

Figure 1 – Global Oceans

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An IT Expert’s View on Climate Modelling

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

One point struck me, reading Anthony’s fascinating account of his meeting with Bill McKibben. Bill, whose primary expertise is writing, appears to have an almost magical view of what computers can do.

Computers are amazing, remarkable, incredibly useful, but they are not magic. As an IT expert with over 25 years commercial experience, someone who has spent a significant part of almost every day of my life, since my mid teens, working on computer software, I’m going to share some of my insights into this most remarkable device – and I’m going to explain why my experience of computers makes me skeptical, of claims about the accuracy and efficacy of climate modelling.

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