Mortgage Rates Fall to 3-month Lows

By Associated Pres – Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

U.S. long-term mortgage rates fell this week to their lowest level in three months, deepening the incentive for prospective homebuyers although they face eroded affordability as prices continue to climb.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday that the average rate for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage declined to 3.60% from 3.65% last week. The benchmark rate stood at 4.45% a year ago.

The average rate on a 15-year mortgage eased to 3.04% from 3.09% last week.

Mortgage rates have shown stability in recent months, buoyed by positive economic data, a strong job market and improved sentiment in the housing market.

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Bidding Wars For US Homes Collapse To Eight-Year Low

[Their graph shows 4 cities on the west coast, NYC, and Chicago as the places where home prices are down (all the others are up). I have to scratch my head and ask, “Why would anybody with a choice want to buy a home there anyway?”]

From Zero Hedge – Re-Blogged From Silver Doctors

Is a downturn in the housing market imminent?

Bidding wars for homes in Seattle, San Jose, and San Francisco have crashed in the past year, reflecting an alarming national trend, according to a new report from Redfin.

The report found that the national bidding-war rate in August was 10.4%, down from 42% a year earlier. The rate printed at the lowest level since 2011.

At the start of 2018, the national bidding-war rate was 59%, then plunged as homebuyers became uncomfortable with sky-high housing prices, increasing mortgage rates, and economic uncertainty surrounding the trade war. The housing market started to cool in late 2018, as the competition among homebuyers collapsed by 4Q18, this is an ominous sign for the national housing market that could soon face a steep correction in price.

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Fed ‘One and Done’ is a Wall Street Fantasy

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From CNBC

One of the current myths promulgated by Wall Street is that the Federal Reserve will raise rates once this year, breathe a sigh of relief, and be done until the “12th of never.” But those who are familiar with our central bank’s history are aware that the Federal Open Market Committee has never tightened the federal-funds rate just once. A quarter-point hiking cycle has no historical basis and is just wishful Wall Street thinking.

In the spring of 1988, fearing a rise in core inflation, the Fed went on a tightening cycle that lasted from April 1988 to March 1989. During that time, the fed-funds rate increased more than 300 basis points (3 percentage points). This episode was followed by a recession beginning in 1990, suggesting that the corrective policy actions may have intensified a weakening economy, and that the Fed is prone to being economically tone deaf.

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