Algorithms in Ocean Chemistry

By Rud Istvan – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Italian physical chemist Daniele Mazza recently sent WUWT a draft of his new ebook on seawater chemistry, seeking WUWT input. Charles asked me to review, since he knew I had previously published on ‘ocean acidification’. I have now done so, and my thinking follows. For those wanting a deep dive on ocean physical chemistry, this new ebook is a much better and more detailed explanation than I could ever hope to provide (started college intending to be a chemistry major, rapidly switched to economics with an emphasis on all forms of mathematical models, not just in economics). But it perhaps lacks nuanced secondary and tertiary ‘Jim Steele’ ocean biological perspectives. For those wanting an oversimplified laymen’s overview of those, see my essay ‘Shell Games’ in ebook Blowing Smoke, especially the paragraphs concerning Florida Bay seasonal ocean chemistry concerning ocean chemistry parts 1 and 2.

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It’s Easy to be Fooled by a Climate Alarmist

By Gregory Wrightstone – Re-Blogged From WUWT

An article highly critical of my book Inconvenient Facts, a bestseller, has received wide distribution. It’s Easy to be Tricked by a Climate Denier purports to be a factual take-down of the book and, by extension, of me. However, it is really just one more example of how proponents of catastrophic man-made warming need to resort to lies and distortion in order to advance their agenda.

The author, Willard MacDonald, is not a scientist but the Vice President of Vivint Solar, a solar panel manufacturer and installer. No conflict of interest there! He does have degrees in computer science and electrical engineering, documenting an education appropriate to his line of work but not applicable whatsoever to discerning the complexities of climate or the long-term records of temperature and carbon dioxide.

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The Solution To Dissolution

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The British tabloid “The Guardian” has a new scare story about what is wrongly called “ocean acidification”. It opens as follows:


Pacific Ocean’s rising acidity causes Dungeness crabs’ shells to dissolve

Acidity is making shells of crab larvae more vulnerable to predators and limiting effectiveness in supporting muscle growth

 

The Pacific Ocean is becoming so acidic it is starting to dissolve the shells of a key species of crab, according to a new US study.


Sounds like the end of times, right? So let me start with a simple fact. The ocean is NOT acidic. Nor will it ever become acidic, except in a few isolated locations. It is alkaline, also called “basic”. The level of acidity/alkalinity is expressed on the “pH” scale, where neutral is 7.0, alkaline is from 7 to 14, and acidic is from 0 to 7.

Figure 1. The pH scale, running from the most acid at the bottom, through neutral in the middle, and up to the most alkaline at the top.

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The Total Myth of Ocean Acidification

[In water chemistry, a pH of 7.0 is neutral, higher numbers are alkaline (basic), and lower than 7 is acid. -Bob]

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

From the American Association of Science of America [1]…

Ocean acidification could boost shell growth in snails and sea urchins

By Katie Camero Jul. 23, 2019 , 2:00 PM

The world’s oceans are acidifying rapidly as they soak up massive amounts of the carbon dioxide (CO2) released from burning fossil fuels. That’s bad news for tiny marine critters like coral and sea urchins that make up the base of the ocean food chain: Acidic water not only destroys their shells, but it also makes it harder for them to build new ones. Now, scientists studying sea snails have discovered an unexpected side effect of this acid brew—it can help some of them build thicker, stronger shells by making their food more nutritious.

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An Ocean Acidification Experiment

By Dr. Michael Chase – Re-Blogged From https://clisciwatch.wordpress.com

SCOPE

This article describes the method and PRELIMINARY outcome of a relatively low cost “laboratory” (kitchen) experiment on the response of seawater pH to increases in atmospheric CO2.

When additional CO2 is added to the air above seawater the chemistry of the water is expected to change, with much focus on the pH measure of acidity. I find that the change in pH when equilibrium is established is readily detectable on a low cost portable pH meter with 0.01 resolution, but the measured size of the effect appears to be significantly smaller than reported in the recent scientific literature. This article deals mostly with the experimental method and results.

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A Benefit of “Ocean Acidification” – More Herring

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

From the NORWEGIAN UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY comes this study where they actually did the experiment right – and dissed other studies where “lab tanks” were used to study the ocean.

Herring larvae could benefit from an acidifying ocean

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #254

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project www.SEPP.org

What Happens Now? Roy Spencer reported that the early calculations for atmospheric global temperature report from the Earth System Science Center at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) show that 2016 was slightly warmer than the prior hot year of 1998 by a statically insignificant 0.02ºC. The earlier part of the year was warmer, but temperatures dropped in the latter part of the year. Spencer produces a table ranking the 38 years by the anomaly from the average: 2016 is now 1, 1998 is 2, 2010 is 3, 2015 is 4 and 2002 is 5. The top 2 years are about 0. 5ºC from the anomaly, and the departure from the anomaly lessens significantly after that. According to Paul Homewood, the UAH calculations were independently confirmed by data from Remote Sensing Systems (RSS).

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #174

The Week That Was: March 28, 2015 – Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP)

Number of the Week: 6.2%

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Intellectual Freedom and Censorship: On her web site, Donna Laframboise, discusses an open letter to museums signed by 54 individuals who described themselves as “members of the scientific community. “ The letter objects to museums receiving funds from “those who profit from fossil fuels or fund lobby groups that misrepresent climate science.” The letter specifically discusses David Koch, who “is a major donor, exhibit sponsor and trustee on the Board of Directors at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, and the American Museum of Natural History.” The letter asserts that “Mr. Koch also funds a large network of climate-change-denying organizations, spending over $67 million since 1997 to fund groups denying climate change science.”

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