After a Collision in Doklam, India and China Are Correcting Course

By Sarang Shidore Senior Global Analyst, Stratfor

Sarang Shidore

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Highlights

  • Tensions between India and China have relaxed considerably since their armies faced off on the Doklam Plateau in the summer of 2017.
  • This change is a result of setbacks to Indian foreign policy and a more difficult global strategic environment for China.
  • Despite a return to limited cooperation, India will continue to see China as its biggest geopolitical rival, though it will compartmentalize its adversarial relationship.
  • India will continue to build up its military and establish new bilateral security ties to counter China, but it will also refrain from joining any anti-China military bloc, will soften its strident opposition to the Belt and Road Initiative and increase participation in Chinese-dominated multilateral initiatives.

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While Media Focuses On New Mexico Jihad Camp, There Are At Least 22 Verified Islamic Terror Training Camps in US

By Tim Brown – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

While the Federal Bureau of Investigation continues to investigate 1,000 ISIS-tied individuals in the united States and authorities investigate the recent Islamic compound with 11 children found in it being trained to conduct school shootings, there are at least 22 paramilitary Islamic communities in the US that they know of but are not doing anything about. Now, the stage has been set for more Islamic jihad attacks on US soil under the watchful eye of the FBI.

The groups are operated by Jamaat al-Fuqra, a Pakistan-based group, who main front group is Muslims of the Americas.

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Trade Wars

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

An overt trade war has commenced. President Trump has fired the starting gun, setting in motion an election promise, part of his Make America Great Again undertaking. It is a blow squarely aimed against China, costing China some trade perhaps, but basically a loser’s last roll of the dice.

The back story appears to be far deeper than some relatively minor tariffs on steel and aluminium would suggest. It comes after a prolonged period of shadow-boxing between America in the blue corner and Russia and China in the red. To pursue the boxing analogy, China and Russia have been soaking up America’s punches on the basis America would simply tire herself out. It has been a replay of Muhammed Ali’s dope-on-a-rope strategy in the rumble-in-the-jungle, with America cast as George Foreman.

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India and the U.S. Find Common Ground in the Indo-Pacific

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Highlights

  • India will frustrate the United States with its need for strategic autonomy and its aversion to formal alliances.
  • New Delhi will avoid military involvement in the South China Sea dispute for fear of inviting retaliation from China across their disputed border or through Chinese-Pakistani joint patrols in the Arabian Sea.
  • India’s primary focus in the Indo-Pacific region will be to safeguard its critical transit routes in the Indian Ocean.

(GIO BANFI/iStock)

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Tracking Global Terrorism in 2018

Scott Stewart   Scott Stewart – Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Editor’s Note

With the start of a new year, we once again examine the state of the global jihadist movement. Shared from Threat Lens, Stratfor’s unique protective intelligence product, the following column includes excerpts from a comprehensive forecast available to Threat Lens subscribers.

In some ways “the global jihadist movement” is a misleading phrase. Rather than the monolithic threat it describes, jihadism more closely resembles a worldwide insurgency with two competing standard-bearers: al Qaeda and the Islamic State. To make matters more complicated, grassroots extremists have been known to take inspiration from each group’s ideology — and, in some cases, both.

A Yemeni man surveys the aftermath of a bombing in Huta, in the southern province of Lahj, March 27, 2017.

(SALEH AL-OBEIDI/AFP/Getty Images)

 

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Trump May Push, but Pakistan Won’t Budge

 Re-Blogged From Stratfor

The new year has brought renewed troubles for the already faltering relationship between the United States and Pakistan. On New Year’s Day, U.S. President Donald Trump issued a tweet accusing Pakistan of “lies & deceit” despite receiving $33 billion in U.S. aid for its cooperation in the war in Afghanistan. The next day, the White House announced that it would continue to withhold the $255 million worth of aid that had been earmarked for Pakistan in 2016, citing insufficient action against anti-NATO militants. And on Jan. 4, the White House said it would suspend $900 million in security assistance promised in 2017 and place Pakistan on a list of countries violating religious freedom.

A map shows Afghanistan, Pakistan and the surrounding region.
(LorenzoT81/iStock)

These Are the High-Tech Weapons the US Might Use Against North Korea

By Greg Walters – Re-Blogged From https://www.seeker.com

The Hermit Kingdom’s recent successes in missile testing are fueling the Pentagon’s search for high-tech measures that might knock out command-and-control structures or even missiles in mid-flight.