The Great Population Hoax Turns 50

By Thomas D Williams – Re-Blogged From Breitbart

This month marks the 50th anniversary of one of the most destructive books of the last century, The Population Bomb, by Paul Ehrlich.

The 1968 doomsday bestseller generated hysteria over the future of the world and the earth’s waning ability to sustain human life, as Stanford biologist Paul Ehrlich offered a series of alarming predictions that turned out to be spectacularly wrong, creating the enduring myth of unsustainable population growth.

Continue reading

Advertisements

China’s Demographic Woes Worsen as Women Opt for Work Over Kids

Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Even after the government cleared the way for couples to have a second child, working women are reluctant to expand their family–or have any children at all.

That’s according to a new survey by Zhaopin.com, one of the nation’s biggest online recruitment websites, which found  about 40 percent of working women without children don’t want to have any and roughly two thirds of those with a child don’t want a second.

Continue reading

2017…The Year Of Monetary Revolution

By Andrew Hoffmann – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

In the past month, I’ve espoused many beliefs of what 2017 will bring – deeming it to likely be a year of money printing and draconian government actions.  In fact, following an historic year of political, economic, and monetary change, the best possible description for what I anticipate in the next 12 months, is “monetary revolution.”  Which, in turn, may catalyze the most dramatic status quo changes of our lifetimes, for anyone born in the post-War era.

Never before has the world faced a man-made calamity of such enormity; partly because of policy – particularly the monetary type; but predominantly, procreation – as let’s face it, there is no way to economically manage 7.4 billion people, without the scourges of socialism, fascism, and communism forcing their way into the fold.  I mean, when the gold standard was abandoned in 1971, the global population was just 3.5 billion, so we have more than doubled the population in less than five decades.

Continue reading

Seven Earth Day Predictions that Failed Spectacularly

By Andrew Follett – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Never Trust The Doom-Mongers: Earth Day Predictions That Were All Wrong

EarthDay_Envorinmental_Scares
The Daily Caller, 22 April 2016

Andrew Follett

Environmentalists truly believed and predicted that the planet was doomed during the first Earth Day in 1970, unless drastic actions were taken to save it. Humanity never quite got around to that drastic action, but environmentalists still recall the first Earth Day fondly and hold many of the predictions in high regard.
So this Earth Day, The Daily Caller News Foundation takes a look at predictions made by environmentalists around the original Earth Day in 1970 to see how they’ve held up.
Have any of these dire predictions come true? No, but that hasn’t stopped environmentalists from worrying. From predicting the end of civilization to classic worries about peak oil, here are seven green predictions that were just flat out wrong.

Continue reading

Have Fossil Fuels Diminished the World’s Sustainability and Resilience?

By Indur M. Goklany – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

The recent Papal Encyclical on the environment’s endorsement of “changes of lifestyle, production and consumption, in order to combat…warming,” and drastic reductions in carbon dioxide and other emissions is based on the notion that “it is not possible to sustain the present level of consumption in developed countries and wealthier sectors of society…” and that the “exploitation of the planet has already exceeded acceptable limits” (paragraphs 23. 27). It also reflects the Pontifical Academies of Sciences and Social Sciences’ Declaration which asserts that “Unsustainable consumption coupled with a record human population and the uses of inappropriate technologies are causally linked with the destruction of the world’s sustainability and resilience” (p. 1).

Continue reading