Energy Used vs Wealth

  By Bob Shapiro – Image from WUWT

As per capita use of energy goes up, so does wealth. Making energy cheaper means more energy can be used, which translates into a higher standard of living. To make people poorer – lowering their standard of living – you raise the cost of energy, reducing the per capita use of energy.

By forcing greater use of more costly solar, wind, and other uneconomical renewables, the US and other western governments (and the NGOs supporting the Global Warming nonsense) are spreading poverty throughout their countries.

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We’ve Just Had the Best Decade in Human History

– Re-Blogged From The Spectator

Little of this made the news, because good news is no news

Let nobody tell you that the second decade of the 21st century has been a bad time. We are living through the greatest improvement in human living standards in history. Extreme poverty has fallen below 10 per cent of the world’s population for the first time. It was 60 per cent when I was born. Global inequality has been plunging as Africa and Asia experience faster economic growth than Europe and North America; child mortality has fallen to record low levels; famine virtually went extinct; malaria, polio and heart disease are all in decline.

Little of this made the news, because good news is no news. But I’ve been watching it all closely. Ever since I wrote The Rational Optimist in 2010, I’ve been faced with ‘what about…’ questions: what about the great recession, the euro crisis, Syria, Ukraine, Donald Trump? How can I possibly say that things are getting better, given all that? The answer is: because bad things happen while the world still gets better. Yet get better it does, and it has done so over the course of this decade at a rate that has astonished even starry-eyed me.

CalEPA Studying Ways to Sunset the California Economy

By Ronald Stein – Re-Blogged From Fox and Hounds

Founder and Ambassador for Energy & Infrastructure of PTS Advance, headquartered in Irvine, California

Tuesday, November 12th, 2019

California is about to take one giant step toward following Germany’s failed climate goals which should be a wake-up all for governments everywhere. Yes, you guessed it, our legislatures have authorized CalEPA in the 2019 – 2020 California State budget and Assembly Bill AB 74 to conduct studies and identify strategies to manage the decline of in-state crude oil production and decrease demand and supply of fossil fuel.

Germany tried to step up as a leader on climate change, by phasing out nuclear, and pioneered a system of subsidies for industrial wind and solar that sparked a global boom in manufacturing those technologies. Today, Germany has the highest cost of electricity in the world.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #385

The Week That Was: November 9, 2019, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, The Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “It’s a kind of scientific integrity, principle of scientific thought that corresponds to a kind of utter honesty–a kind of leaning over backwards.

You must do the best you can–if you know anything at all wrong, or possibly wrong–to explain it. If you make a theory, for example, and advertise it, or put it out, then you must also put down all the facts that disagree with it, as well as those that agree with it. There is also a more subtle problem. When you have put a lot of ideas together to make an elaborate theory, you want to make sure, when explaining what it fits, that those things it fits are not just the things that gave you the idea for the theory; but that the finished theory makes something else come out right, in addition.”

“In summary, the idea is to try to give all of the information to help others to judge the value of your contribution; not just the information that leads to judgment in one particular direction or another.” – Richard Feynman, Cargo Cult Science

Number of the Week: Down 66%. From 1.9 billion to 650 million.

The Buck Stops Here: President Harry Truman (1945 to 1953) was not well liked by the eastern political establishment, either Republican or Democrat. He was considered ill-educated, crude, and ill-suited for the job. Yet he was well read in history. He was ill-prepared for assuming office on April 12, 1945 because President Roosevelt hid his illness and did not include Truman in important discussions.

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Targeting nGDP

By Keith Weiner – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Not too long ago, we wrote about the so called Modern Monetary so called Theory (MMT). It is not modern, and it is not a theory. We called it a cargo cult. You’d think that everyone would know that donning fake headphones made of coconut shells, and waving tiki torches will not summon airplanes loaded with cargo. At least the people who believe in this have the excuse of being illiterate.

You’d think that everyone would know that printing fake money and waving bogus theories around will not create new wealth. The excuse is that so called the wealth effect is so pleasant. Like drugs provide a happiness effect.

There is an old joke about a guy who talks to a psychologist about his crazy brother.
The guys says, “Doc, my brother thinks he’s a chicken.”
The psychologist says, “You should make sure he gets therapy for this delusion.”

“I would, but the eggs are good!”

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Impoverished Island Nation Embraces Coal

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Squatters from the Highlands living at Six-Mile Rubbish Tip in Port Moresby. Stephen Codrington [CC BY 2.5], via Wikimedia Commons

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Carbon Taxes Increase the Risk of Food Insecurity, Worse than Climate Change

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT 

Who would have guessed that raising the cost of energy with regressive carbon taxes would harm a vital, low margin energy intensive economic activity?

Climate taxes on agriculture could lead to more food insecurity than climate change itself

  • Date:July 30, 2018
  • Source:International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis
  • Summary:New research has found that a single climate mitigation scheme applied to all sectors, such as a global carbon tax, could have a serious impact on agriculture and result in far more widespread hunger and food insecurity than the direct impacts of climate change. Smarter, inclusive policies are necessary instead.

An Indian farmer walks with his hungry cow through a parched paddy field in Agartala, capital city of India’s northeastern state of Tripura, March 10, 2005. REUTERS/Jayanta Dey

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