Federal Reserve Note Dances Upon Its Own Grave

By Clint Siegner – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Practically nobody enters the foreign exchange markets looking to buy and hold. Currency trading is generally a short-term game, and there isn’t much regard for analysis of the longer-term fundamentals.

That much is evident given the ongoing rally in the Federal Reserve Note dollar, despite its outlook being downright grim.

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Out Of Money By December 12th – Social Security Partial Inflation Indexing (Part 2)

By Daniel Amerman – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Most advice on long-term planning for retirement and Social Security benefits is based on the assumption that Social Security will fully keep up with inflation. As we are establishing in this series of analyses, the full inflation indexing of Social Security is a myth and there are major implications for standard of living in retirement as well as the associated decisions with regard to both Social Security and investment planning.

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THERE’S Your Hyperinflation!

By Keith Weiner – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Hyperinflation is commonly defined as rapidly rising prices which get out of control. For example, the Wikipedia entry begins, “In economics, hyperinflation occurs when a country experiences very high and usually accelerating rates of inflation, rapidly eroding the real value of the local currency…” Let’s restate this in terms of purchasing power. In hyperinflation, the purchasing power of the currency collapses. Before the onset, suppose one collapsar buys ten loaves of bread. Soon, it buys only one loaf. Shortly thereafter, it buys only one slice. Next, it can only purchase a saltine cracker. Pretty soon the collapsar won’t buy any bread at all. Stick a fork in it, it’s done.

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Thinking Differently About Purchasing Power

By Keith Weiner – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

The dollar is always losing value. To measure the decline, people turn to the Consumer Price Index (CPI), or various alternative measures such as Shadow Stats or Billion Prices Project. They measure a basket of goods, and we can see how it changes every year.

However, companies are constantly cutting costs. If we see nominal—i.e. dollar—prices rising, it’s despite this relentless increase in efficiency.

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