Fed Will Cause a 2008 Redux

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From http://www.PentoPort.com

Truth is a rare commodity on Wall Street. You have to sift through tons of dirt to find the golden ore. For example, main stream analysis of the Fed’s current monetary policy claims that it will be able to normalize interest rates with impunity. That assertion could not be further from the truth.

The fact is the Fed has been tightening monetary policy since December of 2013, when it began to taper the asset purchase program known as Quantitative Easing. This is because the flow of bond purchases is much more important than the stock of assets held on the Fed’s balance sheet. The Fed Chairman at the time, Ben Bernanke, started to reduce the amount of bond purchases by $10 billion per month; taking the amount of QE from $85 billion, to 0 by the end of October 2014.

The end of QE meant the Fed would no longer be pushing up MBS and Treasury bond prices (sending yields lower) with its $85 billion per month worth of bids. And that the primary dealers would no longer be flooded with new money supply in the form of excess bank reserves. In other words, the Fed started the economy down the slow path towards deflation.

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2017 Economic Forecast: Global Headwinds Look Like Mother of All Storms

By David Haggith – Re-Blogged From GREAT Recession Blog

Headwinds that are starting to assail deep structural flaws in the US and global economies form the basis for my 2017 economic forecast, which looks like an all-out economic crisis building throughout the world. Some of these headwinds are global; some more locally focused within the United States, but that which brings down the US economy wounds the world anyway. Ultimately, global concerns threaten the US, and US concerns threaten the globe. We’re all in this together, even as we seem to be flying apart in political whirlwinds everywhere and fracturing national alliances all over the world.

Even in the US where the Trump Triumph has ignited consumer and business hopes and inflamed the stock market, time is not on Trump’s side. Trump’s own key advisors — like Steve Bannon and Larry Kudlow — have stated unequivocally that Trump’s plans must happen quickly if they are going to save the US economy. Trump, himself, campaigned on the endless refrain that the US economy was rapidly approaching catastrophe. That’s why we needed to elect him. If we take the architects of these hope-inspiring plans at their word, 2017 is a make-or-break year for the US, and the clock is ticking against their success.

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Depression, Stagflation, Stag-Depress-Flation

By Gary Christenson – Re-Blogged From The Deviant Investor

The United States suffered through a deflationary depression in the 1930s. Stock prices crashed, currency in circulation declined, commodity and real estate prices fell hard and human misery prevailed.

President Roosevelt revalued gold from $20.67 to $35.00 per ounce in 1934 – a substantial devaluation of the dollar. Make-work and government spending programs were implemented. War followed the depression. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gold_Reserve_Act )

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How Did We Get 2016 So Wrong?

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Go through the late 2015/early 2016 articles published on this and similar sites and you’ll find a consensus that 2016 was going to be a really bad year. Corporate profits were falling, business inventories had spiked, and deflation was deepening in Japan and Europe. See More Ominous Charts For 2016 for a longer list of indicators that seemed, a year ago, to portend imminent recession if not full-blown financial crisis.

As David Stockman put it in a late-2015 prediction piece,

The Keynesian Recovery Meme Is About To Get Mugged, Part 1

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Economic Consequences Of India’s PM Modi

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Two weeks ago, India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi demonetised an estimated 86% of rupees in circulation, offering conversion into a bank account or into smaller currency notes until 31 December, after which these notes will have no redemption value.

Together with forgeries in circulation, it could be over 90% of all circulating money. The terms of redemption are so inconvenient for anyone other than black-marketeers that for all purposes $50bn equivalent of rupees have been eliminated from the economy at a stroke, pending the introduction of new currency notes.

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Dow 20,000 Deja Vu

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

In the last 50 years, prices have gone up around 20 times. Aside from the obvious fact that the FED’s printing of new Dollar Bills out of nothing has stolen 95% of the Dollar’s value, I find it interesting when I consider the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

Around 50 years ago, the Dow approached the 1000 mark for the first time. (I recall seeing a Broaway show “How Now Dow Jones” which used Dow 1000 in the plot line.)

dow-65-to-82

But, the Dow couldnt make it past 1000 at that time. It pulled back by 25% and made another run in ’69, but still it fell back – way back.

The Dow made another 3 tries – and even made it 7% above 1000 before the Recession in 1974 – but it wasn’t until 1982 that the Dow finally broke above 1000 for good.

That was 16 long years that the Bulls had to wait. If a market player had invested all he had in 1966, it took him 16 years before he could start to make a profit.

Of course, the CPI kept going up, so Dow 1000 in 1982 wasn’t worth nearly as much as Dow 1000 was in 1966!

If we consider today’s Dow 20,000 – after prices have run up 20 times – the stock market looks very similar to 1966 with the Dow at 1000.

Except that today:

  • The FED has been printing Dollars for the last 10 years at a much faster pace than it did between 1956 and 1966.
  • The PE Ratio today is around 50% higher than on the Dow 50 years ago.
  • The stock buybacks of today, with their manipulative effect on earnings, were only a twinkle in corporate officers’ eyes in 1966.
  • The Dollar still was “As Good As Gold,” and was 3-4 times the value in 1966 to other currencies compared to today, even after the recent run up.
  • The numbers coming out of DC for such items as Prices and Unemployment were reliable back then, as opposed to the laughable fictions they are today.

So, I guess maybe today’s Dow 20,000 is a bit overextended compared to Dow 1000 in 1966. In 1974, the Dow fell around 50% peak to trough.

But if the Market and the Economy are not in as good shape today as in 1966, then maybe the coming fall from grace will be much bigger.

Do I need to say, “Look out below?”

To Really ‘Make America Great Again,’ End the Fed!

By Ron Paul – Re-Blogged From http://freedomoutpost.com

Former Dallas Federal Reserve Bank President Richard Fisher recently gave a speech identifying the Federal Reserve’s easy money/low interest rate policies as a source of the public anger that propelled Donald Trump into the White House. Mr. Fisher is certainly correct that the Fed’s policies have “skewered” the middle class. However, the problem is not specific Fed policies, but the very system of fiat currency managed by a secretive central bank.

Federal Reserve-generated increases in money supply cause economic inequality. This is because, when the Fed acts to increase the money supply, well-to-do investors and other crony capitalists are the first recipients of the new money. These economic elites enjoy an increase in purchasing power before the Fed’s inflationary policies lead to mass price increases. This gives them a boost in their standard of living.

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