Are Studies of High Penetrations of Wind Power Valid?

By Richard D. Patton – Re-Blogged FROM WUWT

When examining penetrations of wind power, there seem to be two types of papers. In one type, wind penetration up to 20% is difficult but doable, and in the other type wind penetrations of 50-60% are quite easy. In fact, renewable penetrations of up to 90%-100% are claimed.

As an example of the first type, consider the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study performed by GE under contract to NREL (National Renewable Energy Lab). One of their conclusions is the following [1]:

“There appears to be minimal stress on system operations at up to 20% wind penetration. Beyond that point, the system’s operational flexibility is stretched, particularly if the rest of WECC is also aggressively pursuing renewables.”

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Report Reluctantly Admits that ‘Green’ Energy is a Disastrous Flop

By From The Financial Post – Re-Blogged From WUWT

This report should be profoundly embarrassing to the government of Justin Trudeau

Amid hundreds of graphs, charts and tables in the latest World Energy Outlook (WEO) released last week by the International Energy Agency, there is one fundamental piece of information that you have to work out for yourself: the percentage of total global primary energy demand provided by wind and solar. The answer is 1.1 per cent. The policy mountains have laboured and brought forth not just a mouse, but — as the report reluctantly acknowledges — an enormously disruptive mouse.

wind-turbine

The report confirms what should have been obvious from the start: the more “variable” wind and solar are introduced into any electricity system, the more they make it both more expensive and less reliable.David McNew/AFP/Getty Images

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Relying on Renewables Alone Significantly Inflates the Cost of Overhauling Energy

By James Temple – Re-Blogged From MIT Technology Review

growing number of US cities and states have proposed or even passed legislation that would require producing all electricity from renewable energy sources like solar and wind within a few decades.

That might sound like a great idea. But a growing body of evidence shows it’s not.

 A solar farm in Hughsville, Maryland supplies enough electricity for 600 homes.

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Twenty-One Bad Things About Wind Energy — and Three Reasons Why

By John Droz – Re-Blogged From Master Resource

Trying to pin down the arguments of wind promoters is a bit like trying to grab a greased balloon. Just when you think you’ve got a handle on it, it morphs into a different story and escapes your grasp. Let’s take a quick highlight review of how things have evolved with merchandising industrial wind energy.

1 – Wind energy was abandoned for most commercial and industrial applications, well over a hundred years ago. Even in the late 1800s it was totally inconsistent with our burgeoning, more modern needs for power. When we throw the switch, we expect that the lights will go on – 100% of the time. It’s not possible for wind energy, by itself, to EVER do this, which is one of the main reasons it was relegated to the archival collection of antiquated technologies (along with such other inadequate energy sources as horse and oxen power).

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