Pancreatic Cancer Risk Soars With Obesity

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Obesity in the teen years may increase the risk of developing deadly pancreatic cancer in adulthood, researchers report.

The odds for this rare cancer can quadruple due to obesity, the Israeli research team found. Moreover, the risk rises as weight increases, even affecting men in the high normal weight range.

“It’s been known for some time that obesity can increase an individual’s risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and [this is] an important new finding suggesting that obesity and overweight in adolescence can also impact risk,” said Allison Rosenzweig, a senior manager at the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network.

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Living in Noisy Neighborhoods Can Cause Heart Attacks

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Living in noise-saturated neighborhoods might be more than simply annoying – it can increase your risk factors for serious health problems including heart attack, heart disease and stroke, new research.

Chronic noise from traffic and airports appears to trigger the amygdala, a brain region critically involved in stress regulation, brain scans have revealed.

Noise is also associated with increased inflammation of the arteries, which is a risk factor for stroke, heart attack and heart disease, said lead researcher Dr. Azar Radfar. She is a research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

New Drug Combination Hailed as Cystic Fibrosis Breakthrough

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

In what researchers are calling a “breakthrough,” two preliminary trials have found that either of two triple-drug regimens could potentially benefit 90 percent of people with cystic fibrosis.

The trials were short-term, finding that the drug combinations improved adult patients’ lung function over four weeks. But experts said they were optimistic the results will hold up in the larger, longer-term trials already underway.

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Rooting Out Scientific Corruption

By Paul Driessen – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Recent actions show reform is in the wind, but much remains to be done, especially on climate

Dr. Brian Wansink recently resigned from his position as Columbia University professor, eating behavior researcher and director of the Cornell “food lab.” A faculty investigation found that he had misreported research data, failed to preserve data and results properly, and employed dubious statistical techniques.

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Implant, Intense Rehab Help 3 Paralyzed for Years Take Steps

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Three people whose legs were paralyzed for years can stand and take steps again thanks to an electrical implant that zaps the injured spinal cord — along with months of intense rehab, researchers reported Monday.

The milestone, reported by two teams of scientists working separately, isn’t a cure. The patients walk only with assistance — holding onto a rolling walker or with other help to keep their balance. Switch off the spinal stimulator and they no longer can voluntarily move their legs.

Paralyzed men and women now walking with assistance of new implants

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Blood Pressure Study Could Prevent Thousands of Heart Attacks, Strokes

By Zoe Papadakis – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A breakthrough blood pressure study could prevent thousands of heart attacks and strokes each year and it all has to do with genetics, experts announced Monday.

The discovery was made by researchers from Queen Mary University of London and Imperial College London, who conducted the largest global genetic study and found over 500 new gene regions responsible for influencing a person’s blood pressure.

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Early Results Boost Hopes for Historic Gene Editing Attempt

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Early, partial results from a historic gene editing study give encouraging signs that the treatment may be safe and having at least some of its hoped-for effect, but it’s too soon to know whether it ultimately will succeed.

The results announced Wednesday are from the first human test of gene editing in the body, an attempt to permanently change someone’s DNA to cure a disease — in this case, a genetic disorder called Hunter syndrome that often kills people in their teens.

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