Rooting Out Scientific Corruption

By Paul Driessen – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Recent actions show reform is in the wind, but much remains to be done, especially on climate

Dr. Brian Wansink recently resigned from his position as Columbia University professor, eating behavior researcher and director of the Cornell “food lab.” A faculty investigation found that he had misreported research data, failed to preserve data and results properly, and employed dubious statistical techniques.

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Implant, Intense Rehab Help 3 Paralyzed for Years Take Steps

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Three people whose legs were paralyzed for years can stand and take steps again thanks to an electrical implant that zaps the injured spinal cord — along with months of intense rehab, researchers reported Monday.

The milestone, reported by two teams of scientists working separately, isn’t a cure. The patients walk only with assistance — holding onto a rolling walker or with other help to keep their balance. Switch off the spinal stimulator and they no longer can voluntarily move their legs.

Paralyzed men and women now walking with assistance of new implants

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Blood Pressure Study Could Prevent Thousands of Heart Attacks, Strokes

By Zoe Papadakis – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A breakthrough blood pressure study could prevent thousands of heart attacks and strokes each year and it all has to do with genetics, experts announced Monday.

The discovery was made by researchers from Queen Mary University of London and Imperial College London, who conducted the largest global genetic study and found over 500 new gene regions responsible for influencing a person’s blood pressure.

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Early Results Boost Hopes for Historic Gene Editing Attempt

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Early, partial results from a historic gene editing study give encouraging signs that the treatment may be safe and having at least some of its hoped-for effect, but it’s too soon to know whether it ultimately will succeed.

The results announced Wednesday are from the first human test of gene editing in the body, an attempt to permanently change someone’s DNA to cure a disease — in this case, a genetic disorder called Hunter syndrome that often kills people in their teens.

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Japan Scientists to Use ‘Reprogrammed’ Stem Cells to Fight Parkinson’s

By Thomson Reuters – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

TOKYO – Japanese scientists said Monday they will start clinical trials next month on a treatment for Parkinson’s disease, transplanting “reprogrammed” stem cells into brains, seeking a breakthrough in treating the neurodegenerative disorder.

Parkinson’s is caused by a lack of dopamine made by brain cells and researchers have long hoped to use stem cells to restore normal production of the neurotransmitter chemical.

Experimental Drug Halts Parkinson’s Progression

By Clyde Hughes – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

An experimental drug developed by Johns Hopkins University researchers appears to slow down the progression of Parkinson’s disease and its symptoms in mice, a statement from the university said this week.

The researchers said that the drug called NLY01 has been proven in studies to block the degradation of brain cells that is the leading cause of Parkinson’s disease. The treatment has been used in the past to treat diabetes, researchers said in the university statement.

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‘The Data Thugs’

By Peter D. Tillman – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Got your attention, didn’t it? But they are actually the good guys — two working scientists who, behind the scenes, have had striking success in bringing on retractions by publicly calling out questionable data. Their work was written up in Science Magazine in a freely-available article, here.

Once a problematic paper has been identified, it’s seldom straightforward getting it fixed.  Nick Brown and James Heathers have had unusual numbers of successes, perhaps because they start out low-key, but don’t hesitate to go public if they get no response. Other would-be whistle-blowers have had less success, as the Science article describes  in some detail. One whistle-blower’s efforts attracted legal threats — another scenario WUWT readers will recall, with  a few progressing to actual lawsuits. The litigious Dr. Michael Mann comes to mind.

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