Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #312

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org 

Which Trends? Last week’s TWTW may have given a wrong impression to some readers. In discussing the estimate by Christy, et al., of the rate of warming of the bulk atmosphere over the past 38 years of 0.10 ± 0.03°C per decade, the rate of warming was used to project the warming from a doubling of CO2. Not emphasized sufficiently strongly is that the projection embodies the highly speculative assumption that the rate will continue for about two centuries. Most assuredly, it will not.

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Which Has The Bigger Economy: Texas Or Russia?

By Frank Holmes – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

You’ve no doubt heard that everything’s bigger in Texas. That’s more than just a trite expression, and I’m not just saying that because Texas is home to U.S. Global Investors.

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War Drums Beat Louder

By Rick Mills – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Gold’s safe haven status was tested this week as Donald Trump’s economic war threatens to turn into a shooting war, with a number of global flash points getting hotter. At the time of this writing the precious metal moved from a close of $1325.69 an ounce on April 5 to $1337.90 on April 12, dipping on Thursday after reaching a high of $1364.50 during Wednesday morning trading – the highest it’s been since Feb. 14.

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Why Central Banks Could Mint Their Own Digital Currency

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Highlights

  • Only 8 percent of global financial transactions today involve cash, but that figure will diminish even further as digital currencies gain prominence.
  • Faced with the growth of cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin, central banks around the world will continue their research into introducing their own digital currencies.
  • By entering the market for cryptocurrencies, central banks could pose a profound threat to the commercial banking business model.

A worker passes a bitcoin mining operation in Quebec in March 2018.

(LARS HAGBERG/AFP/Getty Images)

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Why A Dollar Collapse Is Inevitable

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

We have been here before – twice. The first time was in the late 1920s, which led to the dollar’s devaluation in 1934. And the second was 1966-68, which led to the collapse of the Bretton Woods System. Even though gold is now officially excluded from the monetary system, it does not save the dollar from a third collapse and will still be its yardstick.

This article explains why another collapse is due for the dollar. It describes the errors that led to the two previous episodes, and the lessons from them relevant to understanding the position today. And just because gold is no longer officially money, it will not stop the collapse of the dollar, measured in gold, again.

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Three Mini-Bubbles Burst. Is One Of The Big Ones Next?

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Financial crises tend to start at the periphery and work their way into a system’s core. Think subprime mortgages (a tiny little niche of a few hundred billion dollars) that blew up in 2007 and nearly brought the curtain down on the whole show.

There’s no guarantee that the same dynamic will play out this time, but stage one – the bursting of peripheral bubbles – has definitely arrived, with three in progress as this is written.

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The Yuan-Oil Future And Gold Price

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Regular readers of Goldmoney’s research will be aware that we were among the first to alert western financial markets that China would introduce a new oil futures contract priced in yuan, months before it was officially admitted that the plans for the contract were being finalised and a date for trading was being planned.

Trading in the new Shanghai oil future commenced last Monday, and on the first three days trading there were 151,804 contracts traded with a turnover value of 65bn yuan. It is the first futures contract listed on China’s mainland available to overseas users, putting them on the same footing as domestic investors. There are 15 benchmark contracts for different delivery dates between September next and March 2019.

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