Abundant, Clean, and Safe

If you truly want to save the planet from global warming, there’s one energy source that can do it. It’s not wind or solar. It’s not coal, oil, or natural gas, either. So what is it? Michael Shellenberger, founder of Environmental Progress, has the answer in this important video.

Please watch the VIDEO

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Amazon Products Reportedly Are Exploding and Catching Fire

Fire Hazard

In recent years, more than 1,500 customers have reported that their Amazon-made electronics are sparking, catching fire, and even exploding.

Reports include poorly-made microwaves that spark and smoke when they’re turned on, USB cords that heat up and start fires, and others, CNN reports. The common thread is that they were all made by AmazonBasics rather than third-party sellers. And despite clear safety hazards, many of the products in question are still on the market.

Pseudo-Science behind the Assault on Hydroxychloroquine

By Leo Goldstein – R$e-Blogged From WUWT

This is a research article published as information for health care professionals and public officials, and for an open peer review. It is not medical advice.

Summary

I reviewed the scientific literature on hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), azithromycin (AZ), and their use for COVID-19. My conclusions:

  • HCQ-based treatments are effective in treating COVID-19, unless started too late.
  • Studies, cited in opposition, have been misinterpreted, invalid, or worse.

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BBC: Blend 20% Hydrogen in Natural Gas to Reduce Home CO2 Emissions

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Last time someone tried to create a Hydrogen economy – the Hindenburg Hydrogen Explosion Disaster – By Gus Pasquerella – http://www.lakehurst.navy.mil/nlweb/images/1213d.gif, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=632191

BBC’s Roger Harrabin and Keele University thinks it would be a great idea to pump vast quantities of hydrogen into people’s homes, to reduce CO2 emissions from gas powered appliances.

Hindenburg Hydrogen Explosion Disaster

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3 Crashes, 3 Deaths Raise Questions About Tesla’s Autopilot

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

Three crashes involving Teslas that killed three people have increased scrutiny of the company’s Autopilot driving system just months before CEO Elon Musk has planned to put fully self-driving cars on the streets.

On Sunday, a Tesla Model S sedan left a freeway in Gardena, California, at a high speed, ran a red light and struck a Honda Civic, killing two people inside, police said.

On the same day, a Tesla Model 3 hit a parked firetruck on an Indiana freeway, killing a passenger in the Tesla.

And on Dec. 7, yet another Model 3 struck a police cruiser on a Connecticut highway, though no one was hurt.

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Who Caused Three Mile Island?

After five major investigations, the real reason for the Three Mile Island accident has remained a mystery. REASON’s reporter has found the missing link.

By Adam Reed – Re-Blogged From Reason (August 1980 Issue)

Three Mile Island, March 28, 1979. Because of maintenance procedures elsewhere in the building, several indicators on the main control panel of the TMI nuclear power plant are temporarily inoperative. In compliance with an order from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, identifying cardboard tags hang from the inactive indicators. These tags are large enough to obscure several other parts of the control panel.

It is 4:00 A.M., and an indicator on the control panel shows an unexpected pressure transient. The plant operators check the auxiliary feedwater valves. Although a control panel light indicates that they are closed, that light is covered by one of the maintenance caution tags hanging from another control. The operators react to the pressure transient on the assumption that the valves are open. As a result, there is an increase in heat, which causes activation of the emergency core cooling system, which functions perfectly.

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Some Fuel Economy Common Sense

By Paul Driessen – Re-Blogged From WUWT

But Greens go apoplectic over rule change that would have no climate or other benefits

Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFÉ) standards were devised back in 1975, amid anxiety over the OPEC oil embargo and supposedly imminent depletion of the world’s oil supplies.

But recall, barely 15 years after Edwin Drake drilled the first successful oil well in 1859, a Pennsylvania geologist was saying the United States would run out of oil by 1878. In 1908, the US Geological Survey said we’d exhaust our domestic oil reserves by 1927; in 1939, it moved petroleum doomsday to 1952.

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What to Do If You Find a Suspicious Package

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Editor’s Note:

The following information was produced and originally published by Threat Lens, Stratfor’s unique protective intelligence product. Designed with corporate security leaders in mind, Threat Lens enables industry professionals to anticipate, identify, measure and mitigate emerging threats to people and assets around the world.

As local and federal authorities continue to collect evidence and search for the suspect(s) behind the recent bombings in Austin, Texas, much discussion has focused on how the devices used in the explosions were triggered.

(Stratfor)

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The Internet Must Remain Anonymous

[Here’s an opposing view to a recent post, -Bob]

By Herman Gazort – Re-Blogged From iPatriot

No. We can not. In the age of political correctness, the Marxist media are thought police. In order to even say anything we need to seek alternative media that is not controlled.

Do you know who Shakespeare is? No. You don’t. William Shakespeare is a pseudonym. None of us know, for certain, who he was.

He planned his anonymity because he knew that in order for people to think for themselves they must only be guided by what they see, so that they can think for themselves and reach their own conclusions, without being influenced by someone else’s power, prestige or money. These are second hand, attributed characteristics that someone else, with a different agenda than your own well being has given the “expert.”

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How Solid Are Canada’s Big Banks?

By Peter Diekmyer – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Originally posted at Sprott Money March 22, 2017

The World Economic Forum consistently ranks Canada’s banks among the world’s safest. Competent regulators have overseen stress tests, tightened lending standards and delinquency rates are low. Demographics are good and the country’s diversified economy is backed by a treasure of oil, wood, gold and other natural resources.

So the experts say.

Institutional investors, relying on the work of Jeremy Rudin, Canada’s chief bank regulator, agree. In fact, Canadian financials accounted for 35.5% of the market capitalization of the benchmark exchange (NBF February).

However this façade hides major uncertainties. Key concerns stand out, which if unaddressed, could spark solvency and liquidity issues in one or more of Canada’s Big Six banks.

The fragilities can be seen in an IMF report, which calculated that Canada’s financial sector accounted for a stunning 500% of GDP in 2012. Today, the assets of the Big Six banks alone are more than double the size of the country’s economy.

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