A “Godzilla Dust Cloud” From the Sahara Desert Is Hitting the United States Right Now

Godzilla Cloud

After wreaking havoc on air quality readings in the Caribbean, dust from the Sahara Desert just arrived at the US gulf coast, forming what experts referred to as a “Godzilla dust cloud.” It’s so large, it can be easily seen and tracked from space.

“This is the most significant event in the past 50 years,” Pablo Méndez Lázaro, an environmental health specialist with the University of Puerto Rico, told AP earlier this week. “Conditions are dangerous in many Caribbean islands.”

“The ongoing Saharan #dust outbreak across the tropical Atlantic is *by far* the most extreme” since records of global dust began in 2002, atmospheric scientist Michael Lowry tweeted on Wednesday.

Jet Stream Carries Sahara Dust to Arctic

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Polar jet circulation changes bring Sahara dust to Arctic, increasing temperatures, melting ice

Summary points

  • A new atmospheric mechanism by which dust travels from the Sahara Desert across the eastern side of the North Atlantic Ocean towards the Arctic has been discovered
  • The dust emission was generated by a Saharan cyclone that was triggered by the intrusion of a trough emanating from the polar jet
  • The poleward transport of warm dust was caused by a meandering polar jet stream
  • Approximately half of the warming in the Arctic is being attributed to increased moisture and heat fluxes transported to the region from lower latitudes

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First Peoples: The Warming Alarm-Dog That Didn’t Bark

By Alec Rawls – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Beneficial climate change allowed modern humans to emigrate out of Africa and spread around the globe says the new PBS documentary “First Peoples,” but it fails to mention that the era it designates as “good times” was several degrees warmer than today.

A critical moment in human history is intoned with intense drama (21:08-21:52 here):

The movement of prehistoric people was affected by the climate, which fluctuated over thousands of years.

I turned up the volume, knowing that if there was anything a warming alarm-dog could find to bark about, it was about to be featured front and center.

In bad times the Sahara was an un-crossable barrier, but in good times, when the climate was wet, the desert disappeared. Any adaption that emerged in one part of Africa could spread to other parts of the continent….

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