Modern Scientific Controversies Part 6

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

food_plates_smPrologue:  This is a follow-up to  a series of five essays that discussed ongoing scientific controversies, a specific type of which are often referred to in the science press and elsewhere as “Wars” – for instance, one essay covered the “Salt Wars1 and another the “Obesity War”.  The purpose of the series was to illuminate the similarities and differences involved in these ongoing controversies, with the final part (Part 5) showing the commonalities with the Climate Wars.    This essay illuminates two important new, potentially paradigm-shifting papers in the field of Human Nutrition and new findings in the Salt Wars that turn that entire field on its head.

Warning:  This is not a short essay.  Dig in when you have time to read a longer piece. 

 

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Modern Scientific Controversies Part 5: Common Elements

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

msc_smPrologue:  This is the fifth, and last, in a series of essays discussing ongoing scientific controversies—each one a so-called “science war”.  This essay attempts to illuminate the similarities that exist between the four previous topics and, of course,  the Climate Wars.

Warning:  This is not a short essay.  Dig in when you have time to read a longer piece.

So far in this series, I have written about The Salt WarsThe Great Barrier Reef Wars, The War on Sugar and most recently The Obesity Epidemic [aka The Obesity Wars].  At the end of each of these essays, I have encouraged readers not to get ahead of themselves by drawing parallels to the Climate Wars, promising that I will get to it in the end–this essay is that end.   What follows is my analysis of the core elements of Modern Scientific Controversies.

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Modern Scientific Controversies Part 1: The Salt Wars

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Prologue:  This is the first in a series of several essays that will discuss ongoing scientific controversies, a specific type of which are often referred to in the science press and elsewhere as “Wars” – for instance, this essay covers the Salt Wars1.  The purpose of the series to illuminate the similarities and differences involved in each.

Warning:  This is not a short essay.  Dig in when you have time to read a longer piece.

From the New York Times, Wednesday, June 1 2016,   “F.D.A. Proposes Guidelines for Salt Added to Food”:

The Food and Drug Administration proposed voluntary guidelines for the food industry to reduce salt on Wednesday [1 June 2016], a move long sought by consumer and public health advocates who said the standards could eventually help save thousands of American lives.”

….

“Americans eat almost 50 percent more sodium than what most experts recommend. High-sodium diets have been linked to high blood pressure, which is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke.”

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