Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #336

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org, The Science and Environmental Policy Project

By Ken Haapala, President

Quote of the Week: “I have observed that not the man who hopes when others despair, but the man who despairs when others hope, is admired by a large class of persons as a sage.” ― John Stuart Mill [H/t Matt Ridley]

Number of the Week: $1,096/MWh – An increase of 22 times

USGCRP Prophecies: On November 23, the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) released the second volume of its two-part series on human caused global warming. The first volume. the “Climate Science Special Report (CSSR)” supposedly discussed the physical science but was largely confined to projections from poorly tested global climate models and physical events unrelated to increasing carbon dioxide. The current release came in time for the upcoming 24th Conference of Parties (COP-24) of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Katowice Poland. According to official announcements, this conference will additionally include “the 14th session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP) and the third part of the first session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement (CMA 1-3)” – international bureaucratic science at its best.

Continue reading

Advertisements

OPEC, Allies Struggle to Fully Deliver Pledged Oil Output Boost

By Thomson Reuters – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

OPEC is struggling to add barrels to the market after agreeing in June to increase output, an internal document seen by Reuters showed, as an increase in Saudi Arabia was offset by declines in Iran, Venezuela and Angola.

The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and allies agreed in June to boost supply as U.S. President Donald Trump urged producers to offset losses caused by sanctions on Iran and to dampen rising prices.

opec in capital blue letters ato four black barrels on white background

Contagion? Turkey Uses Banks to Halt Lira’s Plunge

By Bloomberg – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Turkish policy makers made their first move to bolster the financial system and investor confidence amid a plunge in the lira. The currency, stocks and bonds extended their decline.

Promising to “take all necessary measures,” the central bank in Ankara lowered the amount commercial lenders must park at the regulator and eased rules that govern how they manage their lira and foreign-currency liquidity. While there was no mention of higher interest rates, it said all options were on the table.

Image: Contagion? Turkey Uses Banks to Halt Lira's Plunge

Continue reading

Back Under U.S. Sanctions, Iran Looks for a Plan B

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Highlights

  • Iran’s strategy to get the European Union and other economic partners to push back against unilateral U.S. sanctions will fail.
  • As sanctions hit Iran’s economy, the country will eventually have to resume negotiations with the United States, but it will try to wait until President Donald Trump leaves office.
  • In the meantime, Tehran will consider restarting its nuclear program as leverage in talks with the United States to keep other more important issues off the table.

A picture from March 2017 shows an oil facility on Kharg Island on the Iranian coast.

(ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)

Continue reading

Nicaragua’s Wave of Protests Is Ending — For Now

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Highlights

  • Nicaragua’s government is gaining the upper hand over a 3-month-old protest movement, but demonstrations could flare up again as President Daniel Ortega tries to cement his rule.
  • Because renewed protests would further strain Nicaragua’s economy, thereby inserting a wedge between Ortega and the country’s business elites, the president will try to draw as many allies to his side by distributing benefits to them.
  • Nicaragua will pursue a more authoritarian path if protests continue but fail to unseat Ortega.
  • Though ending the protests will temporarily reduce business risks in Nicaragua, the specter of U.S. sanctions against Ortega and his allies will loom.

(MARVIN RECINOS/AFP/Getty Images)

Continue reading

A Defiant Russia Builds Barriers to U.S. Sanctions

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Highlights

  • As the United States pressures Russia with sanctions, Moscow will use a mix of options to counter the penalties in the short term, including diplomatic negotiations and financial support for threatened businesses.
  • In the long term, Russia will continue deploying a strategy to insulate its people and businesses, leading Moscow to increasingly move away from the West and toward the East.
  • While Moscow may make tactical concessions to protect its economic interests, U.S. sanctions ultimately will be ineffective in compelling Russia to strategically shift its foreign policy, meaning the Russia-West standoff is here to stay.

This photograph shows bars of aluminum.

(MIKE DOTTA/Shutterstock)

Continue reading

To Russia With Caution

Scott Stewart By Scott Stewart – Re-Blogged From Statfor

Highlights

  • Tensions between the West and Russia are ratcheting up in the wake of the nerve agent attack on Sergei Skripal.
  • The heightened hostilities will make day-to-day operations more challenging for foreign companies, nongovernmental organizations and journalists working in Russia.
  • In addition to the threat of government surveillance and harassment, foreigners will likely be the targets of increased violence from nationalists and nationalist gangs.

At a newsstand in Moscow, a paper announces Russian President Vladimir Putin's re-election.

(KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)

Continue reading