Drying The Sky

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Eleven years ago I published a post here on Watts Up With That entitled “The Thermostat Hypothesis“. About a year after the post, the journal Energy and Environment published my rewrite of the post entitled “THE THUNDERSTORM THERMOSTAT HYPOTHESIS: HOW CLOUDS AND THUNDERSTORMS CONTROL THE EARTH’S TEMPERATURE“.

When I started studying the climate, what I found surprising was not the warming. For me, the oddity was how stable the temperature of the earth has been. The system is ruled by nothing more substantial than wind, wave, and cloud. All of these are changing on both long and short time cycles all of the time. In addition, the surface temperature is running some thirty degrees C or more warmer than would be expected given the strength of the sun.

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Scandalously Bad Science

By Jennifer Marohasy’s Blog – Re-Blogged From WUWT

CORALS are animals, closely related to jelly fish, but they differ in having a limestone skeleton. This is hard-stuff, calcium carbonate, and it can persist in the environment and provide an indication of changes in sea level, and also the growth rates of corals, over thousands of years.

Porites corals are typically used to estimate growth rates the Great Barrier Reef. I photographed the surface of this coral when I visited Bramston Reef with Peter Ridd in August 2019. It was so soft, like a carpet, but firm from the corallite: the limestone skeleton supporting individual coral polyps.

Porites corals are typically used to estimate growth rates the Great Barrier Reef. I photographed the surface of this coral when I visited Bramston Reef with Peter Ridd in August 2019. It was so soft, like a carpet, but firm from the corallite: the limestone skeleton supporting individual coral polyps.

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Oreskes Vs. Oreskes

By Rud Istvan – Re-Blogged From WUWT

WUWT reader Max alerted us to a 1994 Naomi Oreskes et. al. paper published in the prestigious journal Science. Her paper was a critical analysis of Earth Science numerical models.

I asked Rud to take a look, since he had previously written on climate models both here and in the ebook Blowing Smoke. What follows is an edited version of what Rud sent us, approved for publication by him.

After a quick read of Oreskes’s paper, I felt a double whammy was in order:

1. Explain Oreskes ‘science’ per se.

2. And then explain her later duplicitous conversion to rabid climate alarmist.

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LEGO Bricks Are Excellent Insulators at Cryogenic Temps

Cool LEGO

A team of physicists at Lancaster University in the United Kingdom recently cooled a handful of LEGO bricks to a couple of millidegrees above absolute zero, which is -273.15 degrees Celsius (-459.67 degrees Fahrenheit).

They found that, thanks to their special shape and composition, the plastic toy bricks were excellent insulators — and could even be helpful in the development of quantum computers in the future.

The Most WTF Science and Tech Moments of 2019

2019 might’ve been the weirdest year on record, yet. And these are the stories making that case.

By Victor Tangermann

IN A WORD?

2019 was a mess.

From neural networks spitting out images inspired by lab monkeys’ nightmares, to dark matter bullets leaving fist-sized holes in the chest cavities of astronauts, this year was filled with the kinds of scientific and technological discoveries that often left us, lacking better poetry, with a single, all-consuming thought:

WTF.

Note that it’s not “WTF?” The difference is between a rhetorical question, and a declarative statement: This is our world. This is our world?! This is our world. We can’t even begin to imagine what weird questions (or answers) the dark and twisted minds of the world’s great scientific and technological talent will come up with for the next one. Forgoing that for now, we say this: May their imaginations be banished to the underworld for eternity — but before they do, let’s peek into their twisted minds one last time. These are the Most WTF Science and Technology Moments of 2019.

Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #392

The Week That Was: December 28, 2019, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP)

Quote of the Week: When asked, what he would tell a generation living 1,000 years from now, Bertrand Russell (1959) replied:

“I should like to say two things, one intellectual and one moral:

“The intellectual thing I should want to say to them is this: When you are studying any matter or considering any philosophy, ask yourself only what are the facts and what is the truth that the facts bear out. Never let yourself be diverted either by what you wish to believe or by what you think would have beneficent social effects if it were believed, but look only and solely at what are the facts. That is the intellectual thing that I should wish to say.” – Bertrand Russell (1959)

Number of the Week: Three-Fold Increase in Fish

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