Pet Cloning is Bringing Human Cloning a Little Bit Closer

By Antonio Regalado – Re-Blogged From MIT Technology Review

When Barbra Streisand revealed to Variety magazine that she’d had her dog cloned for $50,000, many people learned for the first time that copying pets and other animals is a real business.

That’s right: you can pay to clone a dog, a horse, or a top beef bull and get a living copy back in a matter of months.

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HOW BAD IS THE GOVERNMENT’S SCIENCE? (It’s worse than we thought.)

Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

From the National Association of Scholars via an article in the Wall Street Journal.

Policy makers often cite research to justify their rules, but many of those studies wouldn’t replicate

Half the results published in peer-reviewed scientific journals are probably wrong. John Ioannidis, now a professor of medicine at Stanford, made headlines with that claim in 2005. Since then, researchers have confirmed his skepticism by trying—and often failing—to reproduce many influential journal articles. Slowly, scientists are internalizing the lessons of this irreproducibility crisis. But what about government, which has been making policy for generations without confirming that the science behind it is valid?

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A Conversation With Dr. Willie Soon

By Grégoire Canlorbe – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Science, Philosophy and Inquiry on a Galactic Scale

  • Dr. Willie Soon is an independent solar physicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics who has been studying the Sun and its influence on the Earth’s climate for more than a quarter of a century. A short while ago, he had a conversation with Mr. Grégoire Canlorbe, an independent journalist who is also vice president of the French Parti National-Libéral (“National-Liberal Party,” conservative, nationalist, and free-marketist). Here Dr. Soon speaks for himself. 

 

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Interview -Svensmark: Cosmic Rays, Clouds and Climate

Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Prof Henrik Svensmark & Jacob Svensmark discuss the connection between cosmic rays, clouds and climate with the GWPF’s Benny Peiser and Jonny Bairstow from Energy Live News after his recent presentation in London. Video and slideshow follow.

See his slideshow:

Prof Henrik Svensmark & Jacob Svensmark: The Connection Between Cosmic Rays, Clouds and Climate. (pdf)

Presentation in the House of Lords, London, 13 March 2018

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Press Release Science: ‘Dissolving Starfish’ – Debunked

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

press-release_420Every author I have ever queried about a quote attributed to them in a University Science Press Release has told me the same thing.

“That’s not exactly what I said, and not what I really meant,” they tell me.  I can feel the shy grins on their faces as I read their replies.  They are usually rather perplexed as to how the press release sent out to the media by their own academic institution came to contain such a questionable quote but almost always seem to shrug it off with good sense of humor. After all, what can they do?

 

 

 

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #301

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

Skepticism: In an essay titled “Be Skeptical of Those Who Treat Science as an Ideology” appearing in the Wall Street Journal, Dr. Sue Desmond-Hellmann discusses the difference between anti-science and skepticism, and the difference between denialism and skepticism. As an oncologist, faced with treating patients dying with cancer, Dr. Desmond-Hellmann recognized the importance of honesty and integrity in building trust with her patients. She writes: [Boldface added.]

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Science and Nonscience

By Neil Lock – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Today, I’m going to write about science. This won’t be a technical paper. It won’t be full of numbers or equations. Instead, I’m going to look at science from the generalist point of view. I’m going to ask questions like: What is science? How useful is it to the making of decisions, including political ones? And, how can we tell good science from bad?

What is science?

According to Webster’s, science is: “knowledge or a system of knowledge covering general truths or the operation of general laws.”

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