Welcome To The Currency War, Part 20: Corporate Profits Head South, Stock Prices To Follow?

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

A too-strong currency is, in theory, supposed to make it harder to sell things to cheap-currency countries, thus crimping corporate profits and by implication pretty much everything else.

The US dollar has been rising against the rest of the world for over a year, so let’s see how we’re doing. From today’s Wall Street Journal:

Falling Corporate Profits Blur U.S. Growth Outlook

Profits at U.S. companies during the third quarter posted their largest annual decline since the recession, underscoring the competitive pressure from a strong dollar and weak global demand that could limit businesses’ ability to support stronger economic growth in the coming months.A comprehensive measure of companies’ profits across the U.S.—earnings adjusted for inventory and depreciation—dropped to $2.1 trillion in the third quarter, down

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SPX Topping Valuations

Here at US-Issues.com, we deal with “Political Issues of Economic Importance.” Most Americans own stocks, either directly or through some kind of retirement plan. For them, whether stocks will be continuing to go up or will start to head down is of exceptional importance. The fact that market ups and downs are influenced greatly by government policy also makes this a political issue. Please enjoy this piece from Adam Hamilton.

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Guest Post by Adam Hamilton

The prevailing valuations in the lofty US stock markets are increasingly becoming a bone of contention.  Wall Street calmly asserts stocks are fairly valued or even cheap, since it has a huge vested interest in keeping people fully-invested.  But a growing chorus of dissenters is disputing that idyllic notion, warning that stock valuations are very high and portend great downside risk.  Indeed, topping valuations abound.

Since investing is all about buying low and selling high, the price paid for any investment is everything.  Buy good companies at cheap prices, and you’ll multiply your wealth over time.  But buying those very same good companies at expensive prices radically stunts future gains.  While cheap investments have great potential to

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