‘Deep’ Subprime Car Loans Hit Crisis-Era Milestone

From Bloomberg – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Amid all the reflection on the 10-year anniversary of the start of the subprime loan crisis, here’s a throwback that investors could probably do without.

There’s a section of the auto-loan market — known in industry parlance as deep subprime — where delinquency rates have ticked up to levels last seen in 2007, according to data compiled by credit reporting bureau Equifax.

Image: 'Deep' Subprime Car Loans Hit Crisis-Era Milestone as Woes Mount
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Did The Sub-Prime 2.0 Bubble Just Burst?

By Graham Summers – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

We’ve been tracking the sub-prime auto-loan industry closely.

Our view is that this industry represents the worst of the worst excesses of our current credit bubble, much as the subprime mortgage industry represented the worst of the worst in excess for the Housing Bubble.

For this reason, we refer to sub-prime auto-loans as Subprime 2.0.

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Zero Percent Mortgages Debut Setting Up The Next Stage For This Stock Market Bull

By Sol Palha – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Economists stated that main trigger for the financial crisis of 2008 was the issuance of mortgages that did not require down payments.  The ease at which one could get mortgages in the past is what drove housing prices to unsustainable levels. Post-crisis all banks vowed to end the practice forever, or that is what they wanted everyone to believe.   When the credit markets froze, we openly stated that the 1st sign that banks were getting ready to lower the bar again would come in the form of Zero percent balance transfer offers that had all but vanished after 2008.  A few years after 2008, banks started to mail these offers out. Consequently now, everywhere you look you can find 0 % balance transfer offers ranging from 12 months to 18 months.  The next step after that would be for banks to lower the 20% down payment required to something much lower. Currently, Bank of America and a few other banks are offering 3% down mortgages.

Now Barclays Bank has become the first British bank to turn back the hands of time; it has started to issue 0% down Mortgages under a program called “family springboard”.  There is, however, one small difference. In this instance, a parent would put 10% of the down payment into an account. If payments are made in a timely fashion, this amount is returned in three years with interest.

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War on Cash vs Bail In

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

There is a pair of troubling items which have been appearing repeatedly in the news lately:

  • There is a War on the use of Cash, and

  • Several banks which have been insolvent (bankrupt in fact) are being given the legal go-ahead to Bail In depositors’ money.

In case you’ve missed these items, or if you don’t understand why they are important, let me explain.

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Our Current Illusion of Prosperity

By Frank Hollenbeck – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

President Obama and Fed Chair Janet Yellen have been crowing about improving economic conditions in the US. Unemployment is down to 5.5 percent and growth in 2014 hit 2.2 percent.

Journalists and economists point to this improvement as proof that quantitative easing was effective.

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Party Like It’s 2015

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

In 1982 the artist formally known as Prince released a popular party anthem called “1999”. The song was a premonition that 1999 would be a year we would all aspire to “party like”.  It was obvious that Prince was making reference to the excitement associated with ringing in a new century.  However, unbeknownst to him, the accommodative policies of the Federal Reserve would lead to a festal bubble in NASDAQ stocks, making his call to party in 1999 that much more appropriate.

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Subprime Delinquencies Rising In Autoland

David Stockman   By David Stockman – Re-Blogged From http://davidstockmanscontracorner.com

Yesterday’s WSJ article on rising auto loan delinquencies had a familiar ring. It focused on sub-prime borrowers who were missing payments within a few months of the vehicle purchase. Needless to say, that’s exactly the manner in which early signs of the subprime mortgage crisis appeared in late 2006 and early 2007.

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