How the Government Made You Fat

By Bret Scher

Ever since the introduction of the Food Pyramid in the early ’90s, the average American has gotten fatter and sicker. Has this government-approved nutritional guideline — the basis of the modern “healthy diet” — led us astray? If so, how did this happen, and what can we learn from it? Cardiologist Dr. Bret Scher offers some food for thought on this very weighty issue.

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Now They’re coming after the Roast Beef of Old England

By Christopher Monckton of Brenchley – Re-Blogged From WUWT

At Harvard, there was once a University. Now that once noble campus has become a luxury asylum for the terminally feeble-minded. Walter Willett, one of the inmates (in his sadly incurable delusion he calls himself “Professor of Nutrition”), has gibbered to a well-meaning visitor from Business Insider that “eating a diet that’s especially high in red meat will be undermining the sustainability of the climate.”

Farewell, then, to the Roast Beef of Old England. So keen are we in the Old Country on our Sunday roast (cooked rare and sliced thickish) that the French call us les rosbifs. But the “Professor” (for we must humor him by letting him think he is qualified to talk about nutrition) wants to put a stop to all that.

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Experimental Diabetes Drug

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

An experimental drug may help people with type 2 diabetes curb their blood sugar without causing it to drop to dangerously low levels.

Researchers found that the compound — dubbed TTP399 for now — improved patients’ blood sugar control when it was added to the standard medication metformin for six months. And it did so without causing hypoglycemia — blood sugar drops that, if severe, can lead to convulsions or loss of consciousness.

The findings, published Jan. 16 in the journal Science Translational Medicine, come from an earlier Phase 2 trial. And more research is needed before TTP399 can be added to existing armaments against type 2 diabetes, said senior researcher Carmen Valcarce.

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Modern Scientific Controversies Part 6

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

food_plates_smPrologue:  This is a follow-up to  a series of five essays that discussed ongoing scientific controversies, a specific type of which are often referred to in the science press and elsewhere as “Wars” – for instance, one essay covered the “Salt Wars1 and another the “Obesity War”.  The purpose of the series was to illuminate the similarities and differences involved in these ongoing controversies, with the final part (Part 5) showing the commonalities with the Climate Wars.    This essay illuminates two important new, potentially paradigm-shifting papers in the field of Human Nutrition and new findings in the Salt Wars that turn that entire field on its head.

Warning:  This is not a short essay.  Dig in when you have time to read a longer piece. 

 

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Biofuels From Bacteria

By Roger Sowell – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

From Sandia National Labs

Sandia helps HelioBioSys understand new clean energy source

LIVERMORE, Calif.—You might not cook with this sugar, but from a biofuels standpoint, it’s pretty sweet. A Bay Area company has patented a group of three single-celled, algae-like organisms that, when grown together, can produce high quantities of sugar just right for making biofuels. Sandia National Laboratories is helping HelioBioSys Inc. learn whether farming them on a large scale would be successful.

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Modern Scientific Controversies Part 5: Common Elements

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

msc_smPrologue:  This is the fifth, and last, in a series of essays discussing ongoing scientific controversies—each one a so-called “science war”.  This essay attempts to illuminate the similarities that exist between the four previous topics and, of course,  the Climate Wars.

Warning:  This is not a short essay.  Dig in when you have time to read a longer piece.

So far in this series, I have written about The Salt WarsThe Great Barrier Reef Wars, The War on Sugar and most recently The Obesity Epidemic [aka The Obesity Wars].  At the end of each of these essays, I have encouraged readers not to get ahead of themselves by drawing parallels to the Climate Wars, promising that I will get to it in the end–this essay is that end.   What follows is my analysis of the core elements of Modern Scientific Controversies.

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Toward Free Trade in Sugar

By Daniel R. Pearson – Re-Blogged From http://www.cato.org

For decades, political support for the U.S. sugar program has been underpinned by the general sense that the costs of producing sugar in this country are quite high relative to prices prevailing in world markets. Thus, the elimination of government support would lead to the certain death of the sugar industry. Recent analysis indicates that this view simply is not correct. Rather, the U.S. industry would continue to produce sugar economically in the absence of government support.

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