When It Rains It Pours, China Edition

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

The US has its share of problems right now (see One Crisis Is Manageable. Five Might Not Be).

But China is right up there in the “when it rains it pours” sweepstakes. As the apparent source of the covid-19 pandemic, it’s still battling new cases and may yet be blamed for not just spawning the virus but consciously designing and then releasing it. It’s also battling unrest in Hong Kong, saber-rattling with Taiwan, and navigating a complex trade war with the US.

But those things might pale next what’s happening with the massive Three Gorges dam. Rain has been falling almost non-stop for weeks in Southern China, and floods – much worse than usual for this time of year – have inundated cities and towns (including covid-19 epicenter Wuhan) along the Yangtze River. The New York Times  describes this combination of pandemic and flooding as “surreal and difficult”.

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100 Years Later: The Flu

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From WUWT

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One hundred years have passed since the Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918 swept around the world, circumnavigating at least twice between 1918 and 1920, killing outright between 50 and 100 million human beings. The pandemic was so shattering, so pervasive that more accurate numbers of the dead cannot be calculated. Those who lived in developed countries like the United States fared little better than those in less developed nations — once the influenza struck, the victim either recovered after a week of unpleasant flu symptoms or died rapidly, sometimes within hours., with lungs filled with fluids and blood. Influenza, caused by a virus, usually kills the very young, the weak and the very old. But the 1918 Flu, sometimes called “the Spanish Flu”, seemed to preferentially kill young, strong, otherwise healthy men and women in their 20’s, a demographic that normally fared well with only mild symptoms in other flu seasons.

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