Been There, Exceeded That

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Much angst has been expended on a very vague climate threshold, the so-called “2 degrees Celsius limit”, sometimes called the “2° global warming tipping point”.  I find it all quite hilarious, for a reason that will become clear shortly. First a bit of prologue. Here’s the New Republic from 2014 about the two-degree limit:

This Is What Our Hellish World Will Look Like After We Hit the Global Warming Tipping Point

BY REBECCA LEBER, December 21, 2014

The de facto assumption of climate change policy is that the world must limit the increase in global temperatures to 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit (2 degrees Celsius) above pre-Industrial levels, or risk hitting a tipping point where the impact becomes irreversible.

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Al Gore’s ‘Inconvenient Freeze’

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Josh has something to say, or rather, draw, about the recent kerfuffle over Al Gore and Michael Mann’s beliefs as covered here on WUWT and in the Washington Times:

Al Gore under fire for claiming icy storm is ‘exactly what we should expect from climate crisis’

Former vice president links freezing weather along eastern seaboard to global warming

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Global Warming and Extreme Weather

By Andy May – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

This is #6 of 7 posts on the hazards of global warming.  If you can’t read the sign, it says “Global Warming, Absolute Truth that can not be questioned.”  The other two are discussing a global warming research vessel that was trapped in the ice. One wonders why the article doesn’t mention the ship was on a global warming mission. The other responds “For the same reason they didn’t publish those Muhammad cartoons.”

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #294

The Week That Was: December 2, 2017 Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, The Science and Environmental Policy Project

38.5 Years of Data: Using atmospheric data collected by satellites from January 1979 to June 2017, John Christy and Richard McNider of the Earth System Science Center at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) estimate the maximum effect increasing carbon dioxide (CO2) may have on atmospheric temperatures – an upper bound of climate sensitivity to increasing CO2. They do this by using widely accepted statistical techniques to eliminate the effects of two well established natural types of occurrences have on atmospheric temperatures – volcanoes and the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

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Besting the BEST Surface Temperature Record

By Patrick J. Michaels and Ryan Maue, Center for the Study of Science, Cato Institute

Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

JRA-55—BETTER THAN THE BEST GLOBAL SURFACE TEMPERATURE HISTORY, AND COOLER THAN THE REST.

Let’s face it, global surface temperature histories measured by thermometers are a mess. Recording stations come on-and offline seemingly at random. The time of day when the high and low temperatures for the previous 24 hours are recorded varies, often changing at the same station. Local conditions can bias temperatures. And the “urban heat island” can artificially warm readings with population levels as low as 2500. Neighboring reporting stations can diverge significantly from each other.

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Original Measurement Uncertainty

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

GRID1_smallIntroduction:

Temperature and Water Level (MSL) are two hot topic measurements being widely bandied about and vast sums of money are being invested in research to determine whether, on a global scale, these physical quantities — Global Average Temperature and Global Mean Sea Level — are changing, and if changing, at what magnitude and at what rate. The Global Averages of these ever-changing, continuous variables are being said to be calculated to extremely precise levels — hundredths of a degree for temperature and millimeters for Global Sea Level — and minute changes on those scales are claimed to be significant and important.

In my recent essays on Tide Gauges, the question of the durability of original measurement uncertainty raised its toothy head in the comments section.

 

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