With COVID Tests Flooding In, US Healthcare Systems Are Breaking Down

By Victor Tangermann – Re-Blogged From Futurism
The US has a massive healthcare data problem on its hands.

With millions of COVID-19 test results flooding in, many healthcare systems around the US are drowning in paperwork.

More than 3.4 million people have been confirmed to have caught the virus in the country — and that’s just those who tested positive. That kind of volume of tests comes with a massive uptick in paperwork as well.

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Of Tests and Confirmed Cases

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From WUWT

I’ve been saying for some time now that the number of confirmed cases is a very poor way to measure the spread of the coronavirus infection. This, I’ve said, is because the number of new cases you’ll find depends on how much testing is being done. I’ve claimed that if you double your tests, you’ll get twice the confirmed cases.

However, that position was based on logic alone. I did not have one scrap of data to support or confirm it.

Max Roser is the data display genius behind the website Our World In Data. He has recently finished his coronavirus testing dataset, covering the patchwork quilt of testing in various countries. The data is available here.

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COVID-19 Tests: The Non-Fake News

By Dvorah Richman – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Our system may not be the fastest, but it’s giving us trustworthy answers

Federal officials recently testified before the U.S. House Committee on Oversight and Reform about government responses to the COVID-19 crisis. Committee members exhibited concern and frustration, and engaged in politicized finger-pointing, over what they said was needlessly slow development and distribution of diagnostic tests – particularly as compared to some other countries.

Some praised South Korea for testing more people in one day than the U.S. did in the past two months. Italy and the U.K. also got positive mention. One wonders whether these Oversight Committee members have any real appreciation for the system that they and their predecessors created.

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Slow Down Age-Related Hearing Loss

Re-Blogged From Headline Health

How many times did your parents tell you to turn down the loud music because you’re going to lose your hearing?

They had a point. Age-related hearing loss affects 25 percent of adults in the U.S. ages 55 to 64.

And more than 350 million people worldwide are expected to have disabling hearing loss by 2030, according to the World Health Organization.

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Engineered Antibodies Block HIV Infection in Primates for 6 Months

New Blood Test Detects Alzheimer’s Risk

By Sylvia Booth Hubbard – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Alzheimer’s disease has no cure, and drug treatments offer minimal help. Many experts believe that progress in drug research is hindered by the fact that although the disease is thought to begin long before symptoms become obvious, it can’t be diagnosed until the disease has progressed. An earlier diagnosis might provide time for an effective intervention.

German scientists have developed a blood test for Alzheimer’s long before symptoms, like memory loss, appear. Continue reading