Human Trial Suggests CRISPR Could Be a Viable Cancer Treatment

By Kristin Houser – Re-Blogged From Futurism

This could be great news for experimental cancer treatments.

Scientists from the University of Pennsylvania just published the results of the first U.S. trial of CRISPR-edited cells in cancer patients — and they’re very encouraging.

In April 2019, UPenn confirmed that a team of its researchers had officially begun testing CRISPR-edited cells in humans.

For that trial, the scientists had removed immune cells from three patients with advanced, treatment-resistant cancers. They then used CRISPR-Cas9 to edit the cells in order to improve their ability to fight tumors before returning them to the patients’ bodies.

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Handheld Device “Prints” New Skin Directly Onto Wounds

By Kristin Houser – Re-Blogged From Futurism

And it just passed a test on pigs with flying colors.

In 2018, Canadian scientists unveiled a handheld device that “prints” sheets of artificial skin directly onto the wounds of burn victims.

“The analogy is a duct tape dispenser,” researcher Axel Günther told Smithsonian Magazine at the time, “where instead of a roll of tape you have a microdevice that squishes out a piece of tissue tape.”

On Tuesday, the team published the promising results of its latest trial of the device in the journal Biofabrication — putting it one step closer to actual use in burn clinics.

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Possible Corona Virus Breakthrough

Thai doctors are cautiously optimistic about early positive results treating a patient infected with the deadly Chinese Corona virus, by using a mixture of a HIV drugs and anti-flu medications. The Thais attempted the treatment after reviewing previous attempts to treat other strains of Corona virus using the same combination of drugs.
MERS Corona Virus, part of the same family as the Chinese Corona Virus. By Maureen Metcalfe/Cynthia Goldsmith/Azaibi Tamin – https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/mers/photos.html, Public Domain, Link

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Mad Dogs and Americans

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From WUWT

 

featured_image_batsThe U.S. CDC has issued one of its Vital Signs press releases that readers in the United States should be aware of, especially those living in more rural areas.

In the classic of modern American literature, To Kill a Mockingbird, the father of  Scout, the narrator, Atticus Finch, a gentle and mild southern attorney, shocks his children when, at the pleading of  Heck Tate, the town’s sheriff, he takes up a rifle and from a great distance, shoots and kills a rabid dog.  In the 1930s,  “mad dogs”, crazed by rabies, were a serious threat.

 

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New Urine Test May Show Whether Prostate Cancer Needs Treatment

By HealthDay – Re-Blogged From NewsMax Health

A man who learns he has prostate cancer faces a difficult choice: whether to immediately treat the cancer despite potential side effects or wait and see if it’s a slow-growing tumor that never needs treatment.

Men may soon have help making that decision.

Researchers from the United Kingdom report that they’ve created a urine test that can predict the aggressiveness of a prostate cancer far sooner than standard methods.

The new test is called the prostate urine risk test, or PUR. The researchers said it spots men who are up to eight times less likely to need radical treatment within five years of diagnosis. PUR also offers clues about who might need treatment five years sooner than current tests.

Advance in Slowing Prostate Cancer Made in Clinical Trials

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Cutting-edge prostate cancer drugs that help extend life in the toughest cases might also be useful in fighting less aggressive tumors, two new clinical trials suggest.

Two drugs that interfere with cancer’s ability to use testosterone for fuel, apalutamide (Erleada) and enzalutamide (Xtandi), are already approved for use against more advanced prostate tumors that do not respond to regular therapy.

But these trials show the drugs also can improve survival and slow progression in prostate cancers that do respond to regular therapy, which typically involves medication that halts production of testosterone.

Under-the-Tongue Allergy Pills Replacing Shots

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Under-the-tongue allergy pills have quickly caught on as a way to treat hay fever and dust mite allergies, a new study finds.

Allergy shots have been available for more than 100 years, while sublingual, or under-the-tongue, allergy pills were only approved for use in the United States in 2014.

But of 268 U.S. allergists surveyed last year, 73% reported prescribing under-the-tongue allergy tablets, according to allergist and lead author Dr. Anita Sivam, of Memphis, Tenn.