Mad Dogs and Americans

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From WUWT

 

featured_image_batsThe U.S. CDC has issued one of its Vital Signs press releases that readers in the United States should be aware of, especially those living in more rural areas.

In the classic of modern American literature, To Kill a Mockingbird, the father of  Scout, the narrator, Atticus Finch, a gentle and mild southern attorney, shocks his children when, at the pleading of  Heck Tate, the town’s sheriff, he takes up a rifle and from a great distance, shoots and kills a rabid dog.  In the 1930s,  “mad dogs”, crazed by rabies, were a serious threat.

 

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New Urine Test May Show Whether Prostate Cancer Needs Treatment

By HealthDay – Re-Blogged From NewsMax Health

A man who learns he has prostate cancer faces a difficult choice: whether to immediately treat the cancer despite potential side effects or wait and see if it’s a slow-growing tumor that never needs treatment.

Men may soon have help making that decision.

Researchers from the United Kingdom report that they’ve created a urine test that can predict the aggressiveness of a prostate cancer far sooner than standard methods.

The new test is called the prostate urine risk test, or PUR. The researchers said it spots men who are up to eight times less likely to need radical treatment within five years of diagnosis. PUR also offers clues about who might need treatment five years sooner than current tests.

Advance in Slowing Prostate Cancer Made in Clinical Trials

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Cutting-edge prostate cancer drugs that help extend life in the toughest cases might also be useful in fighting less aggressive tumors, two new clinical trials suggest.

Two drugs that interfere with cancer’s ability to use testosterone for fuel, apalutamide (Erleada) and enzalutamide (Xtandi), are already approved for use against more advanced prostate tumors that do not respond to regular therapy.

But these trials show the drugs also can improve survival and slow progression in prostate cancers that do respond to regular therapy, which typically involves medication that halts production of testosterone.

Under-the-Tongue Allergy Pills Replacing Shots

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Under-the-tongue allergy pills have quickly caught on as a way to treat hay fever and dust mite allergies, a new study finds.

Allergy shots have been available for more than 100 years, while sublingual, or under-the-tongue, allergy pills were only approved for use in the United States in 2014.

But of 268 U.S. allergists surveyed last year, 73% reported prescribing under-the-tongue allergy tablets, according to allergist and lead author Dr. Anita Sivam, of Memphis, Tenn.

Parkinson’s Brain Damage Reversed in Study

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

It may be possible to restore brain cells damaged by Parkinson’s disease and reverse a patient’s condition, something no current treatment can do, according to British researchers who conducted potentially groundbreaking clinical trials.

They cautioned the trial was small — just 41 patients — and the research is still in its early days. But the results of the approach, which delivers special “growth factor” proteins to restore failing brain cells, are very promising.

“The spatial and relative magnitude of the improvement in the brain scans is beyond anything seen previously in trials of surgically delivered growth-factor treatments for Parkinson’s,” principal investigator Dr. Alan Whone said in a news release from Parkinson’s UK, which helped fund the study.

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Study Proves Drug Cuts Prostate Cancer Risk

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Helth

Finasteride, best known as the enlarged-prostate medicine Proscar, is a safe, effective way to reduce the risk of prostate cancer, according to long-term findings from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT).

The trial was funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute and enrolled nearly 19,000 men between 1993 and 1997. Initially it found that finasteride — a hormone-blocking drug — cut the risk of prostate cancer by 25 percent. Those results were published in 2003.

The newly released long-term data show that the reduction of prostate cancer risk has continued and that fewer than 100 men in the trial died from prostate cancer in more than two decades of follow-up, according to a research team led by Dr. Ian Thompson.

Israeli Scientists Predict Cure for Cancer Within a Year

By Solange Reyner – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Israeli scientists say they will likely have a cure for cancer within a year, according to The Jerusalem Post.

Dan Aridor, CEO of Accelerated Evolution Biotechnologies Ltd., said his team is developing an anti-cancer drug that will target several mutations in cancer cells using a combination of several-cancer directed peptides. The treatment is called MuTaTo, or multiobjective toxin.

“Our cancer cure will be effective from day one, will last a duration of a few weeks and will have no or minimal side-effects at a much lower cost than most other treatments on the market,” Aridor said. “Our solution will be both generic and personal.”

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