Venezuela’s Socialist Hyperinflation Turned People Back To Barter System

By Mac Slavo – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

In the wake of socialist Venezuela’s massive hyperinflation, citizens have returned to the original monetary system in order to survive.  The barter system is now prevalent in the collapsed economy of the authoritarian dictator, Nicolas Maduro.

Barter is one of the best ways to trade goods, considering its almost impossible to tax those transactions and since money in Venezuela is as difficult to come by as food and medicine, that’s now the preferred method of trading goods and services. Women in Venezuela have been turning to prostitution and asking for payment in food instead of cash for a while now, and as the regime tightens its grip on the private sector, more will have to turn to trade to survive.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Did OPEC Just Cry Uncle?

By Frank Holmes – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

OPEC Decision Helps Oil Post Its Second Straight Month of Gains

You’ve probably heard by now that, in an effort to lift oil prices, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) tentatively agreed to a production cut at its meeting in Algiers last week. The cartel, which controls more than a third of world output, plans to limit daily production to between 32.5 million barrels and 33 million barrels, down from 33.2 million barrels.

This comes more than two years since oil prices were kneecapped, wreaking havoc on several OPEC member nations’ economies. Saudi Arabia currently faces a steep budget deficit, as oil revenues make up close to 90 percent of the country’s budget. Meanwhile, Venezuela’s currency, the bolivar, has become so worthless that it’s now cheaper to use it as a napkin than to buy actual napkins. Airlines flying to the U.S. won’t even accept bolivars. (Of course, this has more to do with the government’s woeful mismanagement of the country than oil prices.)

Continue reading

Venezuela Chaos: The Biggest Threat to Cheap Oil

Venezuela’s deepening chaos could soon create tremors in the global oil markets.

Already in an economic and humanitarian crisis, Venezuela’s oil production — the country’s sole lifeline for revenue — has hit a 13-year low.

As the situation worsens, Venezuela’s oil output could plunge even lower. A new report by Columbia University’s Center on Global Energy Policy calls Venezuela a “growing supply risk for oil markets in 2017.”

Oil prices are currently around $45 a barrel, a dramatic drop from about $110 two years ago. The main reason for the low prices is that there’s too much supply globally. However, the line between oversupply and a shortage in the oil market is thin, and Venezuela could tip the scale in the opposite direction.

Continue reading