Who is at Risk From the Carona Virus?

By Christopher Monckton of Brenchley – Re-Blogged From WUWT

As the old saying goes, In God we trust: all others bring data. At last, we have some decent – if not yet peer-reviewed – data on who is most susceptible to the Chinese virus. A large survey of patients hospitalized with the infection has just been published.

Features of 16,749 hospitalized UK patients with COVID-19 using the ISARIC WHO Clinical Characterization Protocol is full of useful facts of which governments can take advantage.

Perhaps the most startling results were that a third of all hospitalized patients died, 17% are still in hospital and only half have been discharged. Almost half of all intensive-care or high-dependency patients and more than half of all ventilated patients died. Almost half of those admitted to hospital had no comorbidities: age seems to be the most important risk factor.

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Were Dangerous Wuhan Coronavirus Lab Experiments Part Funded by Western Governments?

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

h/t Breitbart; The Australian Daily Telegraph claims a leaked dossier suggests it is China’s fault that Covid-19 spread; China deliberately suppressed knowledge of the outbreak, instead of trying to stop the spread of the epidemic.

But dangerous Wuhan “Gain of Function” Studies, in which virologists deliberately created lethal human pathogens from bat viruses, to evaluate the risk of such pathogens evolving naturally, received funding from the USA and Australia, even after concerns were raised by US embassy scientists in 2018 about inadequate safety procedures.

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China Says This Drug Is “Clearly Effective” Against Coronavirus

By Victor Tangermann – Re-Blogged From Futurism

According to a new study, it can turn coronavirus tests negative in just four days.

According to Japanese media, Chinese medical authorities have found that an antiviral drug called “favipiravir” has shown promise in treating COVID-19 patients, The Guardian reports.

“It has a high degree of safety and is clearly effective in treatment,” Zhang Xinmin, an official at China’s science and technology ministry, told reporters on Tuesday.

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Quarantines May Backfire

The mistaken presumption that a person “catches a cold” from someone else, or a flu virus, or a coronavirus, is the basis for calling a quarantine.

The fallacy of person-to-person transmission is ingrained in the population as news reports of vacationers trapped in China during a coronavirus are flown back to the US and are found to have COVID-19 corona virus that may spread to their family members.  But COVID-19 is not spreading into the community.  Online maps showing the almost stagnant number of coronavirus-confirmed cases in each State are rapidly vanishing from view on the internet.

There is person-to-person transmission of the virus, but not necessarily person-to-person transmission of the disease.  To better explain this, we have to dig back into the annals of epidemiology (the study of disease).

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This, Not Hand Sanitizer, Will Save Us from the COVID-19 Coronavirus

By Foster Kamer – Re-Blogged From Futurism

In the global health war against the COVID-19 coronavirus, there are two measures we know of that effectively prevent the spread of the outbreak while the world waits on a vaccine: Quarantine/social isolation, and cleaning your hands. But what’s the best — if not only surefire way — to get that right?

Washing them with soap and water.

Not hand sanitizer.

Not just water.

It’s soap and water.

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Some Perspective on the #Coronavirus #COVID19 from the CDC

Re-Blogged From WUWT

Folks fretting about the coronavirus are forgetting there’s another virus already running rampant in the United States, one that’s killed nearly 20 times as many people in this country alone.

Influenza has already taken the lives of 10,000 Americans this season, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. At least 19 million have caught the flu, and an estimated 180,000 became so ill they landed in the hospital.

“Influenza is easier to pick up and there are far, far more cases,” said Dr. Alan Taege, an infectious disease physician at the Cleveland Clinic. “It’s already much larger than coronavirus has been so far in the whole world, in our own country alone.”

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Corona Virus Map

  By Bob Shapiro

Johns Hopkins has a Corona Virus map that appears to be updated daily showing where confirmed cases have been reported, along with stats on deaths and recoveries. It gives a breakdown by country – I was surprised that the US showed 15 confirmed cases.

Take a look at: https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6

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Mysterious, Deadly Chinese Virus Officially Reaches the US

By Dan Robitzski – Re-Blogged From Futurism
This is bad. Officials just confirmed the first case in North America.

The deadly coronavirus that’s infected hundreds, and killed at least six in China, has officially made its way to the continental United States.

Authorities have now confirmed a case of 2019-nCoV, a mysterious virus that causes flu-like symptoms, in Washington State, according to The New York Times. While there are already cases in Japan, Thailand, and South Korea, the fact that the virus has now crossed into North America is bad news for the global effort to prevent a pandemic.

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New Flu Drug Approved for First Time in 20 Years

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

For the first time in two decades, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new type of antiviral flu drug.

The single oral dose of Xofluza (baloxavir marboxil) is for the treatment of uncomplicated flu in patients aged 12 and older who have had symptoms for no more than 48 hours.

When used within 48 hours of getting sick with the flu, antiviral drugs can reduce symptoms and duration of the illness, according to the FDA.

New Evidence That Viruses May Play a Role in Alzheimer’s

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Viruses that sneak into the brain just might play a role in Alzheimer’s, scientists reported Thursday in a provocative study that promises to re-ignite some long-debated theories about what triggers the mind-robbing disease.

The findings don’t prove viruses cause Alzheimer’s, nor do they suggest it’s contagious.

Image: New Evidence That Viruses May Play a Role in Alzheimer's

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Party Dips Spread Norovirus, Herpes, Report Says

By Zoe Papadakis – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Party dips can give you norovirus and even herpes, an investigation revealed, so you might want to think twice next time you indulge in a party spread.

On Monday’s episode of Food Unwrapped on Channel 4 in the U.K., microbiologists revealed just what dangerous viruses could be lurking in some of your favorite dips and the worst part is that you would not even know about it until it was too late, The Daily Mail reported.

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Pig Virus Found in China and Ohio Could Be Threat to Humans

By Jen Krausz – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A pig virus found in China in 2012 and in Ohio in 2014 could threaten humans, researchers found when they studied the virus in a lab setting.

The porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) was not even thought to be a disease when it was found in China in 2012, Newsweek reported. In Ohio in 2014, it was causing severe diarrhea in the animals that was sometimes fatal.

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Over-Regulation Is Making Us More Vulnerable to Disease

By Ronald Bailey – Re-Blogged From Reason

Regulatory precaution, not rising temperatures, is the main driver for the increase in vector-borne disease.

“Climate change needs to be put out there as a major driver of vector-borne disease in the U.S.,” Peter Hotez, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Texas’ Baylor College of Medicine, told Gizmodo. This was in response to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that reports of vector-borne diseases have tripled since 2004. These infectious illnesses include Lyme disease that is spread by ticks, and West Nile and Zika viruses spread by mosquitoes. The CDC report is indeed alarming, but not chiefly because climate change is exacerbating certain infectious maladies. Instead, the increase in vector-borne illnesses identified by the CDC says much more about how the proliferation of regulatory barriers is slowing the development and deployment of modern technologies to prevent the spread of disease.

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ATMs Hit By Malware “Jackpotting” Attacks That Dispense All Cash In Minutes

By Mark O’Byrne – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

ATMs in US hit by “jackpotting” attacks that empty ATMs in minutes
– FBI warns of attacks in US after similar crimes in Taiwan, Thailand and Europe

– Hackers have stolen c.$1 million from ATMs across the US warns U.S. Secret Service
– Target Diebold Nixdorf machines – #1 global ATM provider, 35% of ATMs worldwide
– Digital deposits increasingly vulnerable – Time to save in physical gold

Source: TechViral.net

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Don’t Hide Your Gold Coins Where Your Thermostat Can See

By John Rubino- Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Back in the 1990s when businesses started going online they frequently didn’t realize that their new networking gear came with simple default passwords like “admin”. So a whole generation of early hackers simply scanned the web for companies that had inadvertently exposed themselves in this way, siphoning off (probably, no one really knows) billions of dollars and causing various other kinds of mischief.

Now that process is repeating with the Internet of things (IoT). As pretty much every device in homes and businesses is imbued with sensors and connected to internal networks and/or the broader Web, hackers are exploiting the many resulting vulnerabilities.

But this time around it’s personal, as formerly innocuous things like TVs, phones and thermostats gain cameras and microphones, creating all kinds of privacy issues – some of which are potentially (and catastrophically) financial. Here’s a sampling of what appeared on the subject in yesterday’s Wall Street Journal:

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New 1918 Style Flu Pandemic Fear

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

This isn’t a climate article, it is about a real problem.

Back in 1918, the infamous flu pandemic killed an estimated 3-5% of the population of the time – 50-100 million people. The awful potential of a new 1918 style flu Pandemic to sweep the world and kill millions, perhaps billions, despite all our medical advances, makes every flicker of infectious ability for novel strains of flu newsworthy.

H1N1 Flu Virus.

H1N1 Flu Virus. By NIAID (H1N1 Flu Virus) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

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Cyber Attacks on U.S. Companies Since November 2014

By Riley Walters – Re-Blogged From The Heritage Foundation

Researchers are concerned over the strength and comprehensiveness of cybersecurity in the U.S., as companies across the country are being targeted in cyber attacks at an increasing rate of both occurrence and cost. Concerns continue to grow as both the number of attacks on companies’ networks and the cost to companies are increasing. The quantity and quality of information being hacked, stolen, destroyed, or leaked is becoming more of a problem for consumers and businesses alike.

The Ponemon Institute recently released its 2015 Cost of Cyber Crime, which analyzes the cost of all cyber crime for a variety of 58 U.S. organizations both public and private.[1] The U.S., in comparison with other nations in the Ponemon study, continues to rank highest in its cost of cyber crime at an annual average of $15.4 million per company.

Ponemon surveyed companies in the areas of finance, energy and utilities, and defense and aerospace—three of the most affected sectors—as well as communication, retail, and health care. The annual cost of cybercrime for these companies has more than doubled since 2010, which then averaged $6.5 million. Of the companies surveyed, the minimum cost to a company was $1.9 million while the maximum cost was as much as $65 million in 2015.

This year, companies saw an average of 160 successful cyber attacks per week, more than three times the 2010 average of 50 per week.

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