Relationship Between Money Supply And Stock Prices

By IM Vronsky – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Internationally known bond strategist Hunkar Ozyasar makes a scholarly and comprehensive description of the material influence Money Supply has on Stock Prices:

“Money supply is one of the most basic parameters in an economy and measures the abundance or scarcity of money. Stock prices tend to move higher when the money supply in an economy is high. Plenty of money circulating in the economy both makes more money available to invest in stocks and also makes alternative investment instruments, such as bonds less attractive.

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SPIEGEL Interview with African Economics Expert: “For God’s Sake, Please Stop the Aid!”

Interview conducted by Thilo Thielke – Translated from the German by Patrick Kessler

Re-Blogged From Spiegel Online

SPIEGEL:

Mr. Shikwati, the G8 summit at Gleneagles is about to beef up the development aid for Africa…

Shikwati: … for God’s sake, please just stop.

SPIEGEL: Stop? The industrialized nations of the West want to eliminate hunger and poverty.

Shikwati: Such intentions have been damaging our continent for the past 40 years. If the industrial nations really want to help the Africans, they should finally terminate this awful aid. The countries that have collected the most development aid are also the ones that are in the worst shape. Despite the billions that have poured in to Africa, the continent remains poor.

SPIEGEL: Do you have an explanation for this paradox?

Shikwati: Huge bureaucracies are financed (with the aid money), corruption and complacency are promoted, Africans are taught to be beggars and not to be independent. In addition, development aid weakens the local markets everywhere and dampens the spirit of entrepreneurship that we so desperately need. As absurd as it may sound: Development aid is one of the reasons for Africa’s problems. If the West were to cancel these payments, normal Africans wouldn’t even notice. Only the functionaries would be hard hit. Which is why they maintain that the world would stop turning without this development aid.

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Return to a Sound Money in the US

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

Germany, after World War I, was forced to pay war reparations that it couldn’t afford. In 1921, it paid 2 Billion gold marks, but in 1922 it couldn’t make the payment, but was allowed to pay “in kind” in coal, steel, etc. In 1923, France and Belgium invaded and took over Germany’s industrial Rurh Valley.

Workers went on strike, and the government printed paper money to feed them. Thus began Weimar Germany’s Hyperinflation. From 1922

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When Money Dies: Germany and Paper Money After 1910

Reblog from Silver Phoenix 500

Marcia Christoff-Kurapovna October 31, 2014

The story of the destruction of the German mark during the hyper-inflation of Weimar Germany from 1919 to its horrific peak in November 1923 is usually dismissed as a bizarre anomaly in the economic history of the twentieth century. But no episode better illustrates the dire consequences of unsound money or makes a more devastating, real-life case against fiat-currency: where there is no restraint, monetary death will follow.

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