Dow Jones Bear’s Eye View

By Mark J Lundeen – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The Dow Jones saw some selling pressure this past week, closing down 4.94% from its last all-time high of October 3rd of last year.

Time to press the panic button?  Not as far as I’m concerned, but then I also have no exposure to the broad stock market.  But speaking as a spectator sitting in the peanut gallery, my key indicator of when the people who do have market exposure to the NYSE and NASDAQ should exit the market was, and still is when the Dow Jones Industrial Average once again begins experiencing days of extreme volatility, (+/-) 2% daily moves from a previous day’s closing price.  Until the Dow Jones once again begins seeing those dreaded 2% days, I’ll be sitting in the cheap seats eating peanuts and cheering on the bulls.

This week I thought I’d use my Bear’s Eye View (BEV) chart of the Dow Jones going back to February 1885, with an in-depth analysis.  It’s an amazing view of the daily ups and downs for the past 134 years in the Dow Jones.  So what are we actually looking at?  We’re looking at each daily close of the Dow Jones since 16 February 1885, Any Dow Jones closing price that IS NOT a new all-time high registers as a negative percentage from the Dow Jones’ last all-time high.  For example, today’s Dow Jones BEV value indicates it has closed -4.94% from its last all-time high of October 3rd 2018.

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Fed Tightening Is Over: Markets Now Expect Cuts In 2019

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

People who assumed the Fed, along with the rest of the government, would cave the minute the financial markets got a little choppy turned out to be right. A couple of bad months and the “normalization” of both interest rates and the Fed’s balance sheet have stopped cold. Now the markets expect falling rates and (apparently) rising asset purchases. From today’s Wall Street Journal.

Debt Investors Embrace ‘Upside Down’ World After Fed Shift

Signs that the Federal Reserve may be done with its yearslong campaign to raise interest rates are sending ripples through fixed-income markets.

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Federal Reserve’s Balance-Sheet Unwind is Unwinding Recovery

By David Haggith – Re-Blogged From Great Recession Blog

We are in the end time of an unprecedented era of financial expansion — the greatest expansion of the world’s money supply ever attempted, expansion of the Federal Reserve’s vast and unchecked powers far beyond what the Fed could do before the financial crisis, and super-sizing expansion of banks that were already way too big to fail.

I am calling this time in which we are now unwinding this monetary expansion the Great Recovery Rewind because I believe this attempt by the Federal Reserve and other central banks of the world to move us away from crisis banking is taking us right back into economic crisis. That is why this was the top peril listed in my Premier Post, “2019 Economic Headwinds Look Like Storm of the Century.” It is more potent in possible perils than all the trade tariffs in the world.

How “Free Money” Helped Create Sizzling Housing And REIT Gains In Recent Years

By Dan Amerman – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

Housing prices and the associated REIT returns have worked very differently in the United States since the recession of 2001. The increasing financialization of the real estate markets by Wall Street, and the aggressive and unconventional interventions by the Federal Reserve over that time, have combined in multiplicative fashion to produce new and volatile sources of housing profits and losses.

One such change has been the creation of an extremely powerful profit engine for housing, that most real estate investors have not been taking into account. Indeed, there is a strong mathematical case to be made that “yield curve spread compression” has supported and enabled the substantial majority of housing price gains for homeowners and investors on a national average basis since the beginning of 2014.

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Are US Bonds Overvalued?

By Arkadiusz Sieron – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

“We are in a bond market bubble that’s beginning to unwind.” This is the statement of Alan Greenspan. Is he right? We invite you to read today’s article about the US bond market and find out whether it is in bubble or not – and what does it all mean for the precious metals market.

Bond yields are in an upward trend since 2016/2017. And they hit the accelerator again last month. The 10-year Treasury yield topped 3.2 percent, the highest level since May 2011. Other yields have also increased recently: on 30-year Treasuries hit 3.40 in October, while on 5-year US government bonds jumped above 3 percent, as one can see in the chart below.

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The Dollar is Central to the Next Crisis

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From GoldMoney

Introduction And Summary

It is now possible to pencil in how the next credit crisis is likely to develop. At its centre is an overvalued dollar over-owned by foreigners, puffed up on speculative flows driven by interest rate differentials.  These must be urgently corrected by the European Central Bank and the Bank of Japan if the distortion is to be prevented from becoming much worse.

The problem is compounded because the next crisis is likely to be triggered by this normalisation. It can be expected to commence in the coming months, even by the year-end. When flows into the dollar subside and reverse, bond yields can be expected to rise sharply in all the major currencies. There will also be a number of other unhelpful factors, particularly rising commodity prices, the timing of the Trump stimulus and trade tariffs pushing up price inflation. Coupled with a declining dollar, price inflation and therefore interest rates are bound to rise significantly.

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Don’t Count On Yield Curve

By Arkadiusz Sieroń – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Are we going to fall into the trap of a self-fulfilling prophecy? Could investors trigger recession only because they are so worried about inversion of the yield curve? We invite you to read our today’s article about the yield curve and find out whether the popularity of the yield curve as an indicator of recession will bring on the recession that everyone is so afraid of.

In the last edition of the Market Overview, we have discussed whether gold investors should worry about the yield curve. Or should they keep their fingers crossed for its inversion? We concluded that not necessarily, as its predictive power has weakened and it doesn’t say anything about the timing of recession.

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