Prove You’re Not a Terrorist

By Jeff Thomas – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Recently, France decided to crack down on those people who make cash payments and withdrawals and who hold small bank accounts. The reason given was, not surprisingly, to “fight terrorism,” the handy catchall justification for any new restriction governments wish to impose on their citizens. French Finance Minister Michel Sapin stated at the time, “[T]errorism feeds on fraud, money laundering, and petty trafficking.”

And so, in future, people in France will not be allowed to make cash payments exceeding €1,000 (down from €3,000). Additionally, cash deposits and withdrawals totaling more than €10,000 per month will be reported to Tracfin—an anti-fraud and money laundering agency.

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Prices, the FED, and Elections

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

I came across a web site which has a comparison of food & gasoline costs over the last 60 years: the same staple items in 1954, 1984, and 2014. Not surprisingly, prices are up – way up.

The same basket of goods which today costs $28.38, cost $11.26 in 1984. And, it cost only $3.68 in 1954! Prices for these items have gone up almost 8 times during the last 60 years – that’s a compounded annual rate of about 3.5%!

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Can A Nation $18 Trillion In Debt Afford Higher Interest Rates & Will This Change Our Retirements?

By Daniel Amerman – Re-Blogged From http://danielamerman.com/

For some years now, very low interest rates have been reducing the earnings of retirement investors as well as the lifestyles of many of those already retired. To understand why this has been happening – and why it may continue for a very long time – one must recognize that there is a direct relationship between the interest rates that are paid to savers, and the interest payments made by a heavily indebted federal government.

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Let’s Blame The Savers

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Just like in the world of fashion, economic terminologies come in and out of vogue. One such economic term trending recently is Secular Stagnation.   First proposed by Keynesian economist Alvin Hansen back in the 1930s, Secular Stagnation was coined to explain America’s dismal economic performance—in which sluggish growth and employment levels were well below potential.

The term is now back in style thanks to the likes of the contemporary heroes of Keynesian economics, like Larry Summers and Paul Krugman; and is based on the notion that a chronic savings glut has resulted in the economy operating well below potential.

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How An Anti-Piracy Law Became a Tool for Online Censorship

By Scott Shackford – Re-Blogged From http://www.Reason.com

In March, online video game critic Jim Sterling discovered that one of his YouTube videos had been yanked from the site due to claims of a copyright violation. The video in question was a review of an indie game called Skate Man Intense Rescue that included footage from the game. Sterling was apparently not a fan.

The yanking of Sterling’s video was not an accident or a mistake. The game studio, Digpex games, filed a claim using the tools provided by the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1996 (DMCA) to order YouTube to take down the video. When contacted by gaming blog Kotaku, an anonymous

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Climate Youth–The Next Generation Science Standards

By James Sawhill – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

The Next Generation Science Standards provide two new science areas that teachers are to present, students are to learn, and for which K-12 US schools will be held accountable –

Weather and Climate and Earth and Human Activity

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The Existential Danger To The Euro Is Elections

By Daniel R. Amerman – Re-Blogged From http://danielamerman.com

There is a respectable chance that the euro will collapse sometime in the next several years, with implications for employment, economic growth and investment markets on a global basis.  And the biggest threat is not directly money, debt, a potentially rapidly approaching Greek default, or a failure of central banking policies – but is instead something much simpler.

The risk is elections. That is, the near term existential threat to the euro – and indeed the global financial system – is when voters don’t do what the status quo politicians, the media and bankers want them to do.

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End Energy Subsidies

By Chris Edwards – Re-Blogged From http://www.downsizinggovernment.org

The energy industry has been heavily regulated and subsidized by the federal government for decades. The Department of Energy’s array of subsidy programs grew out of atomic research efforts of the 1950s, responses to the energy crisis of the 1970s, and concerns about conservation and global warming in recent decades.

The department spends about $9 billion annually on civilian energy research and subsidies. The following are some of the major program areas with the 2008 spending levels listed:

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #177

The Week That Was: April 18, 2015 – Brought to You by www.SEPP.org The Science and Environmental Policy Project

THIS WEEK: By Ken Haapala, President, SEPP – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Energy Not Heat, Exclusively: A source of frustration for members of SEPP, and others, are the efforts by some of classifying these skeptics as denying the existence of the greenhouse effect, often by claiming that the greenhouse effect is contrary to the second law of thermodynamics. The law applies to the flow of heat (thermal energy) from a warmer body to a cooler one. The atomic theory of heat (thermal energy) is based on the motion of atoms and/or molecules. Though it may use atoms, the transfer of energy does not require them. There forms of energy other than heat.

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Unsound Banking: Why Most Of The World’s Banks Are Headed For Collapse

By Doug Casey – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

You’re likely thinking that a discussion of “sound banking” will be a bit boring. Well, banking should be boring. And we’re sure officials at central banks all over the world today—many of whom have trouble sleeping—wish it were.

This brief article will explain why the world’s banking system is unsound, and what differentiates a sound from an unsound bank. I suspect not one person in 1,000 actually understands the difference. As a result, the world’s economy is now based upon unsound banks dealing in unsound currencies. Both have degenerated considerably from their origins.

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The Spread between Stock Prices and GDP is Blowing Out

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From http://www.pentoport.com

On a fundamental basis stock prices are reflective of both economic and earnings growth. When growth is strong, stock prices should increase in value. And when economic activity decelerates or turns negative, stock prices should go down. Of course nothing is that simple—especially today, when all markets are so highly manipulated by governments and central banks. Beginning in 2008 the markets followed the Fed on a magical journey down the rabbit hole into a wonderland where bad news is good news; and economic fundamentals and stock prices no longer move in tandem.

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The Rise Of The Paper Machines

By Gary Christenson – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Since 2011 the financial markets have been dominated by rises in paper markets and declines in commodity markets.

Group One Paper Examples:  T-Bonds, US Dollar Index, S&P 500 Index

Group Two Commodity Examples:  Crude Oil, Sugar, Wheat, Gold, Silver

Group One markets are “paper” markets in fiat debt, fiat currency, and paper equities.  They are heavily influenced by “money printing,” Quantitative Easing, High-Frequency-Trading, futures, central banks, and political agendas.

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Peak Oil Re-visited

By Mike Jonas – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWihThat.com

In 2012, I said that it was getting ever more difficult to increase production, and that I suspected that we were already at or close to Peak Oil, but that it was still mathematically possible that Peak Oil was many years away. Do I still think that? In a way, yes, but … well, read on …

In this article, I look at the major factors affecting oil supply, look at past oil market behaviour and how the future may develop, see what lessons can be learned from Hubbert’s Peak, and speculate on when Peak Oil will occur and what it may feel like.

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Experts: Hurricane Activity at 45 Year Low, USA Major Hurricane Drought Almost a Decade

By Anthony Watts – Re-Bloged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

While climate campaigners hope for a big El Nino this year, and wish for more hurricanes to use for ridiculous “poisoned weather” headlines, the reality is that we are in a hurricane drought, not just in the USA, but globally as well.

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Open Letter to U.S. Senators Ted Cruz, James Inhofe and Marco Rubio

By Bob Tisdale – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

To: The Honorable Ted Cruz, James Inhofe and Marco Rubio

Dear Senators Cruz, Inhofe and Rubio:

I am writing you as chairs of the Subcommittee on Space, Science, and Competitiveness, of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, and of the Committee on Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries, and Coast Guard. I am an independent researcher who studies global warming and climate change, and I am probably best known for my articles at the science weblog WattsUpWithThat, where I would be considered an investigative reporter.

I have a few very basic questions for you about climate model-based science. They are:

  • Why are taxpayers funding climate model-based research when those models are not simulating Earth’s climate?
  • Why are taxpayers funding climate model-based research when each new generation of climate models provides the same basic answers?
  • Redundancy: why are taxpayers funding 4 climate models in the U.S.?
  • Why aren’t climate models providing the answers we need?
    • Example: Why didn’t the consensus of regional climate models predict the timing, extent and duration of the Californian drought?

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Fewer Workers, More Beneficiaries, Less Prosperity

By Bill Bonner – Re-Blogged from http://www.davidstockmanscontracorner.com

In politics and economics, most people believe what isn’t true: that the common folk select their leaders … and that these leaders are wiser than God.

We recall an early experiment. The pilgrims washed up in the wrong place … and then proceeded to almost exterminate themselves with clumsy central planning. Their system discouraged work and encouraged zombies. Wrote Plymouth County governor William Bradford:

 [The system of] taking away of property and bringing [it] into a commonwealth [caused] confusion and discontent [and] retarded much employment that would have been to benefit and comfort [of the settlers].

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #176

The Week That Was: April 11, 2015 – Brought to You by www.SEPP.org The Science and Environmental Policy Project

By Ken Haapala, President, SEPP – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com 

Climate and Health: By using the Freedom of Information Act, Chris Horner, of the Competitive Enterprise Institute, obtained an email addressed to “Richard Winsor” the imaginary employee of EPA used by Lisa Jackson as a disguise for receiving and sending email. The particular email in question, dated March 18, 2009, discussed strategic communications and suggested EPA shift its tactics from emphasizing the weakening science of global warming to the fear of pollution, especially air quality, with emphasis on the EPA’s Children’s Health Office. As discussed in the February 7 and February 14 TWTWs, the EPA has done this, making many highly questionable claims about respiratory diseases, such as asthma, even though the causes are not known and the disease may be greatly over-diagnosed, not only in the US but in England as well. TWTW cited research that made the claims dubious, at best.

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Q1 Earnings Risky For Stocks

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

The highly-anticipated first-quarter earnings season is in full swing, with traders eager to see how US companies are faring.  While expectations are low, these profits releases still collectively pose serious risks for today’s overvalued and overextended US stock markets.  A few high-profile misses could prove all it takes to unleash a long-overdue serious selloff.  Investors and speculators alike need to remain wary.

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Handling the FED’s Bad Policies

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

The FED (Federal Reserve) controls money and credit within the United States. While the President nominates the FED Chair and a few other officers, the FED is NOT part of the US government. To be sure, Congress can abolish the FED, just as the previous US National Banks were, so the FED tends to be “responsive” to what the politicians want.

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The “Other” 4G’s

By Bill Holter – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

No, we’re not talking about 4G phones, nor God, Gold, Guns and Grub.  Today let’s look at GE, Greece, and finish with a very interesting Germany and Gazprom.  Last week GE shocked the market place by announcing they will sell their crown jewel GE Capital.  Why would they do this?  Isn’t GE capital their growth engine?  Isn’t it their cash cow?  What could they possibly be thinking?  In my opinion they are “thinking” correctly, maybe a bit too late though.

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FDIC Plots a Bank Heist Involving YOUR Accounts

By Guy Christopher – Re-Blogged From http://www.moneymetals.com

There’s a new front opening up in the war on your wealth. If you haven’t heard yet of the “bail-in,” you will. Even if you have, you need to know the latest…

The bail-in is another weapon in the government’s arsenal of capital controls meant to reward Wall Street cronies and separate you from your money.

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How to Convince a Climate Skeptic He’s Wrong

By Christopher Monckton of Brenchley

What Evidence,” asks Ronald Bailey’s headline (www.reason.com, April 3, 2015), “Would Convince You That Man-Made Climate Change Is Real?

The answer: a rational, scientific case rooted in established theory and data would convince me that manmade climate change is a problem. That it is real is not in doubt, for every creature that breathes out emits CO2 and thus affects the climate.

The true scientific question, then, is not the fatuous question whether “Man-Made Climate Change Is Real” but how much global warming our sins of emission may cause, and whether that warming might be more a bad thing than a good thing.

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Stop Government Statistical Fraud

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

The US Federal Government continues to release reports to the American people that either mislead or falsify the underlying data. This sorry state of affairs has been going on for generations, although it appears to have gotten worse – and blatantly so – during the reign of the current Administration.

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The Sun and the Wind are Free, But …

… Converting them to reliable electricity is expensive, if not impossible.

By Marita Noon – Re-Blogged From http://www.cfact.org

In an effort to get America off of fossil fuels, “free” solar and wind energy is often touted as the solution. However, in reality, the so-called free energy has high costs and does little to minimize fossil-fuel use or cut greenhouse gases.

Because solar and wind energy are not available 24/7—also frequently referenced as not “dispatchable”—incorporating them into the electricity portfolio requires backup power to be available on demand. When the sun doesn’t shine or the wind doesn’t blow, we still expect to have heating or air conditioning, cook our dinners, charge our phones, and use our computers. To do this, requires fossil fuels—typically natural gas “peaking plants,” but depending on what is available, it may be a coal-fueled power plant that is forced to operate inefficiently; releasing more CO2 than it would if allowed to operate as intended.

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Cash Is No Longer “King”… It’s a Criminal Suspect

By Clint Siegner – Re-Blogged From http://www.MoneyMetalsExchange.com

Cash was king. These days, it is more of a headache than it is royalty.

When it comes to larger purchases, the advantages once conferred by carrying a wad of green stuff in your wallet are all but gone. Justice Department officials in the U.S. (and officials elsewhere) are ratcheting up their decades-long war on cash. To hear them tell it, cash is mostly useful for terrorists and low-down criminals. Your use of any significant amount of cash can now make you guilty in the eyes of the law until you prove the transaction was legitimate.

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Triggers By Russia And China

By Bill Holter – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

The big story regarding the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank was the application by the Israelis.  This came just prior to the deadline and of course at the displeasure once again to Washington.  Britain was the early defector followed by Germany, France and Italy.  Eyebrows were raised when Saudi Arabia made their announcement…but I believe what was truly missed was the application by Taiwan.

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Ben Bernanke Blogs

By Keith Weiner – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Ben Bernanke presided over the Federal Reserve for two terms, from 2006 through 2014. A year and half into his first term, he began driving the Federal Funds Rate down. By the end of his frantic interest episode, this key overnight lending benchmark had been crushed. It hit bottom, and it hasn’t sprung back in over 6 years since.

Everyone is harmed by zero interest policy. Who suffers the most is open to debate, but one obvious candidate is the retiree who lives on a fixed income. These are people who worked and saved their whole lives, and now they depend on interest to buy groceries and heat their homes. For them, zero interest is like breathing air without oxygen. They suffer a slow death by suffocation.

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Greeced Lightning!

By Bill Holter – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

We seem to have finally arrived at some sort of moment of truth regarding Greece and their inclusion in the EU.  The speculation is they will be out of money by April 9th, this Thursday, unable to make a less than 500 million euro payment.  Please keep in mind they have already been raiding the country’s pension plans to fund day to day services.  How large of a “dent” they have already made remains to be seen but that is not the point.  The point is this, any person, corporation or government who needs to dig into retirement savings for daily operations is like buying a carton of cigarettes with a credit card at 14.99% …and then carrying the balance!

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A Portrait of the Classical Gold Standard

By Marcia Christoff-Kurapovna – Re-Blogged From http://mises.org/Blog

“The world that disappeared in 1914 appeared, in retrospect, something like our picture of Paradise,” wrote the economist Cecil Hirsch in his June 1934 review of R.W. Hawtrey’s classic, The Art of Central Banking (1933). Hirsch bemoaned the loss of the far-sighted restraint that had once prevailed among the “bankers’ banks” of the West, concluding that modern times “had failed to attain the standard of wisdom and foresight that prevailed in the 19th century.”

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #175

The Week That Was: April 4, 2015 – Brought to You by www.SEPP.org Science and Environmental Policy Project

By Ken Haapala – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

On to Paris: To keep pledges made at meetings (multiple Conference of Parties (COP)) of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), an international treaty agreed to in 1992 by the first president Bush and which went into force in 1994, 33 out of 195 countries submitted their pledges to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (particularly carbon dioxide (CO2)). These are to be agreed upon at the December COP in Paris. These pledges are called Intended National Determined Contribution (INDC). The countries that submitted pledges by March 31 included those in the European Union, the US, Russia, and Mexico.

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Great News: New Mexico’s Asset Forfeiture Reform Bill Signed by Governor

– Ree-Blogged From http://reason.com

Actual criminal conviction will be required to take citizens’ property in New Mexico.

Waiting to pretty much the last possible moment, Republican New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez has signed into law House Bill 560, the state’s broad asset forfeiture reform legislation. The bill, introduced by Republican Rep. Zachary Cook, had complete bipartisan approval in the state’s split House (controlled by Republicans) and Senate (controlled by Democrats). Nobody voted against it.

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End FED Manipulation of Interest Rates

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

When interest rates are kept low artificially, as has been the FED’s policy for at least the last 10 years, some benefit while others are hurt. Many times, those who are hurt don’t even know it is happening to them.

An insurance company, for example, collects premium money from policy holders, and then it invests that money. The actuaries working for the company are charged with figuring out the odds of a claim so that the premium can be set to very closely offset the money paid out in claims (plus the overhead).

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Perverse Climate “Morality”

Guest essay by Paul Driessen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Current climate policies mean energy deprivation, poverty, disease and death for billions.

You’ve got to admit, liberal are masters at describing every initiative they launch as “the moral thing to do.” Their campaign for draconian energy regulations and a new global warming treaty is no exception. Protecting people, wildlife and ecosystems from climate catastrophes is the greatest moral cause of our time, alarmist scientists, activists, politicians, bureaucrats, clerics and journalists insist. Rubbish.

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Three Sigma Extremes In The Bond Market

By Gary Christenson – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

US T-Bond futures closed Friday, March 27 up nearly 12% from the February close.  That was the 3rd largest monthly percent move since 1977 when my data begins and created a 3.61 standard deviation change.  This is a huge move.  What does it mean?

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Our Current Illusion of Prosperity

By Frank Hollenbeck – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

President Obama and Fed Chair Janet Yellen have been crowing about improving economic conditions in the US. Unemployment is down to 5.5 percent and growth in 2014 hit 2.2 percent.

Journalists and economists point to this improvement as proof that quantitative easing was effective.

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Did The Fed Just Admit to Deep Uncertainty About Our Financial Security In Retirement?

By Daniel R. Amerman, CFA – Re-Blogged From http://danielamerman.com

Generally speaking, the chairperson of the Federal Reserve is treated by the mainstream financial media as being the very paragon of respectability. If the Fed says it – then the voice of economic authority has spoken, and we need to listen carefully.

Yet, recent comments by Janet Yellen have instead made her a source of “controversial” economic ideas, with some financial reporters and their editors apparently feeling a duty to protect their reading audience – and let them know this is not acceptable economic thinking, but rather is “far outside the mainstream.”

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Return to Free Markets

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

The workings of the Free Market hasn’t been taught in our schools for generations. That being the case, many (most?) Americans lack the background to understand just what the Free Market is capable of achieving – or even understanding that what the US Economy is, is not a Free Market Economy in the true sense.

Lip service is paid, with various socialist economists saying such foolish things as, “We have a mixed economy – a partnership between the private and the public sector.” But in reality, when one partner has the ability to control the activity of the other, then it’s not really a partnership – it’s a command economy.

'Sure it's a partnership, Elwood, but it's a limited partnership, and you're the one who's limited.'

One problem for most Americans may be summed up in a statement I’ve heard several times: “If the government didn’t do such and such, it just wouldn’t get done. Nobody else has the strength of purpose and the resources to do that function.”

So, let’s imagine for a moment that all the computer gear in the United States – all the CPUs, the screens, the routers and modems – everything, was made by a single manufacturer, and that organization was owned and run by the US government. Prices might be the same as today, with the higher costs being subsidized by taxpayers. I expect that the wide variety of choices simply would never have been created, and the technology would advance little or not at all.

If some “nutcase” were to suggest privatizing this business, he would be laughed off the stage. “It’s too complex for private companies to do.” “There would be duplication of effort on a massive scale.” “Nobody could afford the capital investment.” “Prices would skyrocket since taxpayer subsidies also would end.” “The profit motive will hurt consumers as greedy owners will put out stripped down products at exorbitant prices.”

Greedy Businessman

Does all that sound familiar?

As we know with the benefit of what actually has happened in the computer industry, it not only is possible – is has offered amazing innovation at a breakneck speed. Not every company has survived, which is another way of saying that the best have survived.

Could there be improvements? Of course. They’re happening all the time. If today’s leader doesn’t make those improvements, then it won’t be tomorrow’s leader.

Is innovation in the product or service, in the cost to provide it, and in developing alternatives, something which exists today only in the computer business? I suggest that this is exactly what the Free Market does if the government – the senior partner – will just step out of the way.

I’ve posted on getting rid of the US Department of Education recently. But how about just privatizing education completely? Could the Free Market do better than a couple of generations worth of a stagnant or falling level of educational achievement – and that poor performance at five times the real cost of a couple of generations ago?

Greedy managers won’t care about the kids.” “They’ll provide one size fits all education.” “They won’t cater to the disadvantaged, the gifted, or the challenged students.”

Free Markets

These are the same fallacious arguments, using somewhat different words, that we heard when we looked at the computer industry. However, on closer inspection, we see that these arguments apply more to today’s dysfunctional education system than to the dynamic – if seemingly chaotic – choices which a Free Market would provide at lower cost.

I chose to look at privatizing education because this is where the workings of Free Markets – of Free Enterprise – are being hidden from our children.

Without an appreciation of the economic system which has provided the riches we now enjoy – riches which our leaders are squandering – the US will just continue down the road to being just another socialist, third world country.

Department of Education Proposed Spending Cuts

By Chris Edwards – Re-Blogged From http://www.Cato.org  http://www.DownsizingGovernment.org

The Department of Education should be closed and its programs terminated. The main activity of the department is to provide grants to state and local governments. However, channeling taxpayer dollars through Washington and then back to the states is an inefficient way to fund local activities such as education. It would be better if the states funded their own education programs free from all the paperwork that comes with federal aid.

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February 2015 Global Surface (Land+Ocean) and Lower Troposphere Temperature Anomaly & Model-Data Difference Update

By Bob Tisdale – Re-Blogged From https://bobtisdale.wordpress.com

This post provides an update of the data for the three primary suppliers of global land+ocean surface temperature data—GISS through February 2015 and HADCRUT4 and NCDC through January 2015—and of the two suppliers of satellite-based lower troposphere temperature data (RSS and UAH) through February 2015.

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K-12 Education Subsidies

By Neal McCluskey – Re-Blogged From http://www.downsizinggovernment.org

The Department of Education operates a wide range of subsidy programs for elementary and secondary schools. The aid and related federal regulations have not generally lifted academic achievement. The department also subsidizes higher education through student loan programs. Unfortunately, that aid has fueled inflation in college tuition and is subject to widespread abuse.

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$100 Trillion Global Bond Bubble Poses “Systemic Risk” To Financial System

By Mark O’Byrne – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

The Financial Times warned today about the growing global ‘bond bubble’ and potential severe problems in the bond markets and ‘systemic risk’ which may come to a head in June if the Federal Reserve raises interest rates.

In an article entitled “Time to find out hard way if asset management is systemic risk“, it quotes James Bullard from the Fed warning of “dire consequences” due to developing asset price bubbles if the Fed does not raise rates soon.

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Extremes: Expect Consequences (Part 2)

By Gary Christenson – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

WHAT EXTREMES?

Crude Oil has fallen nearly 60% in less than a year – back to lows last seen in 2008, after crashing from a high near $147 a few months earlier.  The economic consequences in the oil sector will be extreme.

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Climategate & Investigations of IPCC and CRU: Was There a Pattern of Cover Up?

Guest Opinion: Dr. Tim Ball – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Every time a serious threat to IPCC climate science appears, whether scientific or political, diversions and counterattacks are implemented. It usually involves people and agencies at the highest levels, with dissemination and support through major media outlets. One of the earliest examples involved changes to the 1995 IPCC Report Chapter 8 comments agreed on in committee. The response is proportional to the political damage they perceive. Avery and Singer noted about Chapter 8 changes,

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Fool’s Gold Paradise

By Max Photon – Re-Blogged From http://www.MaxPhoton.com

An article recently appeared in the Guardian newspaper titled: Are we ready for the next volcanic catastrophe?

It reads: “The largest eruption ever recorded, in Indonesia 200 years ago, wreaked havoc across the world, causing hunger, disease and death for years afterwards. When a volcanic event on that scale happens again – and it will – we should be prepared for serious disruption to our climate and food production.

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