Prove You’re Not a Terrorist

By Jeff Thomas – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Recently, France decided to crack down on those people who make cash payments and withdrawals and who hold small bank accounts. The reason given was, not surprisingly, to “fight terrorism,” the handy catchall justification for any new restriction governments wish to impose on their citizens. French Finance Minister Michel Sapin stated at the time, “[T]errorism feeds on fraud, money laundering, and petty trafficking.”

And so, in future, people in France will not be allowed to make cash payments exceeding €1,000 (down from €3,000). Additionally, cash deposits and withdrawals totaling more than €10,000 per month will be reported to Tracfin—an anti-fraud and money laundering agency.

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Prices, the FED, and Elections

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

I came across a web site which has a comparison of food & gasoline costs over the last 60 years: the same staple items in 1954, 1984, and 2014. Not surprisingly, prices are up – way up.

The same basket of goods which today costs $28.38, cost $11.26 in 1984. And, it cost only $3.68 in 1954! Prices for these items have gone up almost 8 times during the last 60 years – that’s a compounded annual rate of about 3.5%!

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Can A Nation $18 Trillion In Debt Afford Higher Interest Rates & Will This Change Our Retirements?

By Daniel Amerman – Re-Blogged From http://danielamerman.com/

For some years now, very low interest rates have been reducing the earnings of retirement investors as well as the lifestyles of many of those already retired. To understand why this has been happening – and why it may continue for a very long time – one must recognize that there is a direct relationship between the interest rates that are paid to savers, and the interest payments made by a heavily indebted federal government.

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Let’s Blame The Savers

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Just like in the world of fashion, economic terminologies come in and out of vogue. One such economic term trending recently is Secular Stagnation.   First proposed by Keynesian economist Alvin Hansen back in the 1930s, Secular Stagnation was coined to explain America’s dismal economic performance—in which sluggish growth and employment levels were well below potential.

The term is now back in style thanks to the likes of the contemporary heroes of Keynesian economics, like Larry Summers and Paul Krugman; and is based on the notion that a chronic savings glut has resulted in the economy operating well below potential.

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How An Anti-Piracy Law Became a Tool for Online Censorship

By Scott Shackford – Re-Blogged From http://www.Reason.com

In March, online video game critic Jim Sterling discovered that one of his YouTube videos had been yanked from the site due to claims of a copyright violation. The video in question was a review of an indie game called Skate Man Intense Rescue that included footage from the game. Sterling was apparently not a fan.

The yanking of Sterling’s video was not an accident or a mistake. The game studio, Digpex games, filed a claim using the tools provided by the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1996 (DMCA) to order YouTube to take down the video. When contacted by gaming blog Kotaku, an anonymous

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Climate Youth–The Next Generation Science Standards

By James Sawhill – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

The Next Generation Science Standards provide two new science areas that teachers are to present, students are to learn, and for which K-12 US schools will be held accountable –

Weather and Climate and Earth and Human Activity

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